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Attracting Young Folks/Music Tempo

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    0AM7L@SIA May 10, 2006, 9:09 p.m. (Message 45221)

    To me, one sign of a 'superior' dancer is someone who can adapt to the
    tempo.  As someone who's watched more dancing (and demo's) than I care to
    remember, there's nothing worse than one head bobbing out of sync with the
    others.  This happens even in 8 hands around and back: 7 heads in sync, one
    not.  It is a glaring, obvious error that the audience sees over all other
    'mistakes.'  
    
    To be brutally honest, if a person can't pick up the beat from Scottish
    Country Dance music--and slow down or speed up to match--they should sell
    their ghillies.  (;)
    
    Margaret Sarna
    Michigan
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    Helen Brown May 10, 2006, 10:09 p.m. (Message 45223, in reply to message 45221)

    Margaret Sarna said
    
    <To be brutally honest, if a person can't pick up the beat from Scottish
    >Country Dance music--and slow down or speed up to match--they should sell
    >their ghillies.  (;)
    
    Oh no!   These are the challenges that spice every teacher's life!   It
    might take months or even years of patience but the reward is wonderful.
    
    Helen
    
    Helen C N Brown
    York, UK
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    Martin May 11, 2006, 9:25 a.m. (Message 45233, in reply to message 45223)

    Helen Brown wrote:
    > Margaret Sarna said
    >  if a person can't pick up the beat ... they should sell
    > their ghillies.  (;)
    >   
    >
    > Oh no!   These are the challenges that spice every teacher's life!   It
    > might take months or even years of patience but the reward is wonderful.
    If only everyone had your patience, Helen !
    
    Martin
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    Ron Mackey May 12, 2006, 1:04 a.m. (Message 45245, in reply to message 45233)

    > > Oh no!   These are the challenges that spice every teacher's life!   It
    > > might take months or even years of patience but the reward is wonderful.
    
    > If only everyone had your patience, Helen !
    > 
    > Martin
    
    	It's not really a question of patience, is it?   It is allowing 
    people to learn at their own pace.
    	There is someone in my class who has two left feet and I 
    thought would never, ever make a dancer but he did enjoy himself 
    and often has us laughing at and with him.     Last Friday (my last of 
    the season) for the first time he went through a whole dance x8 and I 
    didn't call to him once. He noticed it too and was as pleased as 
    punch.
    He's been with me for five years!
    
    	I think it is one of the causes of these 40 minute step 
    practise sessions that some teachers are impatient and want to see 
    perfect dancing as soon as possible so that when They are on the 
    dance floor as few as possible interrupt their elegant progress.
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    Pia Walker May 12, 2006, 9:46 a.m. (Message 45253, in reply to message 45245)

    Could it also be perhaps, that we try and teach too much all at once -
    rhythm, steps, formations, dances?   And that as we grow up to become
    adults, it becomes 'embarassing' to repeat things?    Children seem to be so
    much more patient with regards to going over old ground, but if you did the
    same dance 5 weeks running in a class of adults, they would be grumbling,
    yet repetition is the only way of gaining confidence in some cases, and
    confidence is the one thing that is needed for people to progress in SCD and
    probably in many other disciplines as well.
    
    How many teachers out there, actually go up to someone and say 'Well done' -
    'Well saved' - or 'I like your posture/the way you got there/the way you
    hold your head/your smile/your help' etc etc.  In true teacher fashion, we
    only criticize and pick up the faults.  Surely we should do both.
    
    Pia
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    Ron Mackey May 13, 2006, 12:12 a.m. (Message 45275, in reply to message 45253)

    > How many teachers out there, actually go up to someone and say 'Well done' -
    > 'Well saved' - or 'I like your posture/the way you got there/the way you
    > hold your head/your smile/your help' etc etc. 
     > Pia
    
    	Oh yes!  All the time.  Even on here when I like what has 
    been said.
    How can one not?
    And to the musicians!!
    And to the teachers!!
  • ...

    Pia Walker May 13, 2006, 5:37 p.m. (Message 45281, in reply to message 45275)

    Well Ron - we all know that you are one in a million :>)
    
    See you at St A - it doesn't seem a year since we had the 'when will you be
    there' cry for summer school.
    
    Pia
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    john.m.sturrock May 12, 2006, 2:26 p.m. (Message 45262, in reply to message 45245)

    Ron Mackey wrote :
    
    > It's not really a question of patience, is it?   It is allowing
    > people to learn at their own pace.
    
    This reminded me of a girl, aged about 8, who came to one of my classes many 
    years ago.
    
    She was bright and intelligent  -  but her skip change was 
    right-close-right-close-right, left-close-left-close-left  -  and at the end 
    of the season, 33 classes later, it was still the same.
    
    I thought that that would be that, but no, back she came, aged 9, 
    right-close-right-close-right, left-close-left-close-left.  She was one of 
    the most regular attenders I ever had.
    
    And back she came aged 10, right-close-right-close-right, 
    left-close-left-close-left.  I used to lie away at nights wondering what to 
    try next  -  as the class had a live musician, there were many 
    possibilities.
    
    Back she came aged 11  -  and, one night, launched into the most perfect 
    skip change you ever did see in an 11 year old, topped by the most wonderful 
    smile on her face.
    
    I'd like to report that she is now a mainstay of some far-flung Branch  - 
    but if so, I do not know, because I never saw her again after that night. 
    Maybe this was something she had decided to master, and, when she did, she 
    moved on to mastering something else.  Whether she is in now SCD, or not, 
    I'm sure she is a success, because she had learned that, with perseverence, 
    one can achieve almost anything.
    
    John M Sturrock
    Cupar UK
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    Ron Mackey May 13, 2006, 12:12 a.m. (Message 45274, in reply to message 45262)

    .  Whether she is in now SCD, or not, 
    > I'm sure she is a success, because she had learned that, with perseverence, 
    > one can achieve almost anything.
    > 
    > John M Sturrock
    > Cupar UK
    > 
    
    Lovely story, John.
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    SMiskoe May 10, 2006, 10:13 p.m. (Message 45224, in reply to message 45221)

    I know lots of people who were disasters in the beginning.  Sometimes  they 
    remain that way for years but there is always improvement and they are  
    enthusiastic promoters of dance.
    Sylvia Miskoe, Concord, NH USA
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    Pia Walker May 10, 2006, 10:15 p.m. (Message 45225, in reply to message 45221)

    Try and take a look at their faces in stead - I go for the smiles - it's not
    the ones with their heads bobbing out of synch that worries me, but the ones
    without the smiles.
    
    And you can only pick up a beat by learning how to listen - how many classes
    teach their dancers how to listen in stead of how to dance?
    
    Pia
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    Ron Mackey May 11, 2006, 12:13 a.m. (Message 45230, in reply to message 45225)

    > Try and take a look at their faces in stead - I go for the smiles - it's not
    > the ones with their heads bobbing out of synch that worries me, but the ones
    > without the smiles.
    > 
    > And you can only pick up a beat by learning how to listen - how many classes
    > teach their dancers how to listen in stead of how to dance?
    > 
    > Pia
    
    
    	Oh, yes Pia.   If they don't leave the hall with a big grin on 
    their collective faces then you have failed!
    
    	As for the music - but of course.   It's an art form based 
    firmly and irrevocably on the music.
  • ...

    Christina France May 11, 2006, 12:34 p.m. (Message 45237, in reply to message 45221)

    Hi,
    	I'm with Helen and Pia give me someone who enjoys their dancing
    whether they can do the steps correctly or not to teach. As far as why young
    people don't dance ? Maybe it is the straight faces young people do not
    like.
    	Christina
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    Andrew Smith May 12, 2006, 9:53 a.m. (Message 45254, in reply to message 45221)

    If we were "brutally honest" we would lose more than one enthusiastic
    member, and would be much the poorer for it. I have met some 'superior'
    dancers in my time that were only technically perfect, and it would have
    been a more enjoyable occasion for everyone if they were not in the set
    clearly showing their impatience with the less able, even on occasion
    actually ignoring them.
    In my book a 'superior' dancer is one who having mastered the technique
    will not make the less able feel unwanted, but will make them feel
    positively welcome, and will make the less able feel that the 'superior'
    dancer has enjoyed dancing with them as much as if they were dancing with
    another 'superior' dancer.
    There may be "nothing worse than one head bobbing out of sync" from a
    critical spectator point of view, but remember that dancing is for the
    dancers, it is not a spectator sport.
    Even in the most sophisticated demonstration I would suggest that the most
    important aspect is that the audience feels first and foremost that the
    dancers are enjoying themselves and enjoying the music and the dance. There
    is then a very good chance that they will be distracted from bobbing heads
    and untidy feet by 'the spirit of the dance.'
    Technique does make a difference, obviously, but it is not the only measure.
    Enjoyment, sociability and respect for others are of the greatest
    importance, IMHO.
    Andrew,
    Bristol, UK
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    Christina France May 12, 2006, 10:28 a.m. (Message 45255, in reply to message 45221)

    Well said,
    Christina
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    Phill Jones May 12, 2006, 10:52 a.m. (Message 45257, in reply to message 45221)

    Couldn't agree more.  You missed one thing though... The 'superior'
    dancers are also more than capable of detering experienced dancers
    too!!!

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