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The Guid Man of Ballangigh

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  • ...

    Marie Disiewicz Feb. 3, 2006, 10:48 a.m. (Message 44074)

    Hi Everyone
    I would like to know who was around when the RSCDS produced The
    Guidman of Ballangigh in Book 30.
    
    I have the printed music for 3 versions in The Playford Ball.
    Three dances all different than the one in Book 30.
    The spelling is a little different also.
    
    I would love to know the Royal Scottish Country Dance history on this one.
    Cheers
    Marie from Surrey B.C. Canada_______________________________________________
    http://strathspey.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/strathspey
  • ...

    Jean Martin Feb. 3, 2006, 1:11 p.m. (Message 44089, in reply to message 44074)

    Hi there, Marie
    I had no involvement with RSCDS HQ Committees when Book 30 was produced but
    we danced The Guidman here in Aberdeen.  It was danced as a SLOW jig and
    required a lot of control, (cf. The Gentle Shepherd) which may be the reason
    why it lost popularity.  The instructions I had originally exactly replicate
    the movements in the Book 30 dance though they are expressed differently.
    You mention a different spelling - is it Balangeich?
    The dance was a favourite with Tibbie Cramb who was probably on the
    Publications Committee at that time.  John Drewry may also have been on the
    Committee and I'll check with him.
    Jean Martin
  • ...

    Martin Feb. 3, 2006, 1:42 p.m. (Message 44094, in reply to message 44089)

    I remember first learning this as an English c d (a Playford dance, I 
    believe).
    When I announced (called, briefed) it at an SCD event, some alert souls told 
    me I had it all wrong.
    Checked my sources.
    No, my memory had not  let me down.
    But when the Society adopted the dance, it was changed without anyone 
    telling me
    ;-)
    Not to match Scottish style, or anything excusable, just changed.
    
    (details for those interested:
    ECD : 1-4: 1st man leads his pt down, cast back
    5-8: 1st man leads 2nd man across, cast back.
    9-12: 2nd man leads his pt up, cast back.
    13-16:  2nd lady leads 1st lady across, cast back.
    Each dancer (except 1st lady) dances an 8-bar sequence, picking up the 
    person in his right after casting to original place.
    
    SCD : 9-12: (2nd man stands still while) 1st & 2nd ladies dance across, cast 
    back.
    25-28: 4 hands round halfway in 4 bars is hardly typical to SCD, whereas it 
    can be walked wide in ECD.)
    
    And I still prefer the flow of the ECD version.
    
    Martin,
    in Grenoble, France
  • ...

    Elainerb Feb. 3, 2006, 1:22 p.m. (Message 44091, in reply to message 44074)

    This one was definitely an English dance fist. The original movements are  
    similar (two people dancing through the other two and back to place in 4  bars)  
    but the pairings are completely different and it flows  beautifully.  This is 
    one of those dances that should have been left as an  English dance.  Not 
    sure how some of these old English dances 'morph' into  a similar but different 
    Scottish dancee that usually don't work as well.!
     
    Marjorie has the history on this one and often uses this in her classes of  
    English/Scottish similarities and differences etc.
     
    Elaine
  • ...

    Jean Martin Feb. 3, 2006, 2:46 p.m. (Message 44103, in reply to message 44091)

    Marie et Al
    I agree with Elaine about the English origins of this dance BUT  The Guidman
    of Balangigh was James V of Scotland!
    Jean
  • ...

    Pia Walker Feb. 3, 2006, 3:04 p.m. (Message 44105, in reply to message 44103)

    And he was called this because he like to disguise himself and go round the
    commoners in Balanguich/gigh whatever - if you go to Stirling Castle, he is
    one of the statues you can see in the courtyard.
    
    Pia
  • ...

    Martin Feb. 3, 2006, 3:45 p.m. (Message 44108, in reply to message 44103)

    
          
        
  • ...

    Bryan McAlister Feb. 3, 2006, 4:38 p.m. (Message 44110, in reply to message 44103)

    I seem to recall reading that this dance was   English Dance to Scottish 
    tune (as opposed to Dashing White Sergeant (Scottish dance to English 
    tune)
    
    In message <009c01c628c8$429db5c0$xxxxxxxx@xxxx>, Jean Martin 
    <xxxx@xxxxxxxxxxx.xxxxxxxxx.xx.xx> writes
    >Marie et Al
    >I agree with Elaine about the English origins of this dance BUT  The 
    >Guidman
    >of Balangigh was James V of Scotland!
    >Jean
    >----- Original Message -----
    >From: <xxxxxxxx@xxx.xxx>
    >To: <xxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx>
    
    -- 
    Bryan McAlister
  • ...

    Martin Feb. 3, 2006, 1:55 p.m. (Message 44100, in reply to message 44074)

    I get this for every message ssdrnt to Strathspey:
  • ...

    SMiskoe Feb. 3, 2006, 3:01 p.m. (Message 44104, in reply to message 44074)

    When Bk 30 came out I taught the Guid  Man and found it awkward and  hard to 
    make the figures in time.  In the same evening, as I had a musician  who 
    played both ECD and SCD, I taught the Playford 1790 version.  Most of  the class 
    decided that they preferred the ECD version, it was more relaxed and  flowed 
    better.  
    Sylvia Miskoe Concord NH USA
  • ...

    Mike Mudrey Feb. 3, 2006, 6:28 p.m. (Message 44117, in reply to message 44104)

    Original publication Playford 1695
    
    Tune  A New Scottish Jig
    
    
    
    
    
    At 2/3/2006  08:01 AM, xxxxxxx@xxx.xxx wrote:
    >When Bk 30 came out I taught the Guid  Man and found it awkward and  hard to
    >make the figures in time.  In the same evening, as I had a musician  who
    >played both ECD and SCD, I taught the Playford 1790 version.  Most 
    >of  the class
    >decided that they preferred the ECD version, it was more relaxed and  flowed
    >better.
    >Sylvia Miskoe Concord NH USA
    
    M.G. Mudrey
    106 Ravine Road
    Mount Horeb, WI 53572
    
    xxxxxxxx@xxxx.xxx
    608-437-3701
  • ...

    SMiskoe Feb. 3, 2006, 4:45 p.m. (Message 44112, in reply to message 44074)

    The tune for the Geud Man is the same in the Barnes' Book and in Book 30,  
    except for the key.
    Sylvia Miskoe, Concord, NH USA
  • ...

    SMiskoe Feb. 3, 2006, 7:31 p.m. (Message 44119, in reply to message 44074)

    Dyslectic fingers again.  I should have typed 1709 which puts the  dance on a 
    par with the 1695 version.
    Sylvia Miskoe Concord, NH USA

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