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Dolphin reels revisited

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  • ...

    Peter Price June 27, 2006, 6:49 p.m. (Message 45675)

    My apologies to all, and I will try to clarify my position.
    
    
    In "Dancing Dolphins" Barry Skelton's directions are very specific.
    
    - 1st couple are side by side at the start and stay parallel with the
    set throughout the reel-
    
    therefore NOT tandem reels but something very different with a very
    pronounced and different feel in the dancing.  My error in not
    checking every dance to see if the reels were identical but I was
    focused on the particular dance.
    
    I find that this is the only dance in the book where Barry specifies
    that parallelism. One possible interpretation then is that "Dancing
    Dolphins" is a special case and that in all other dances the reels are
    to be tandem reels- that is one dancer following the other except for
    the lead changes.
    
    I have no problem with calling a tandem reel a tandem reel (and in
    "Pelorus Jack" the reels are tandem). My problem was with teachers
    calling the reels in "Dancing Dolphins" tandem reels and having the
    dancers then dance the reels as tandem reels.
    
    There are several dances in which Barry Skelton sets up 1C, one behind
    the other, for tandem reels (The Sailor's Guide, An Ocean Frolic,
    Crossing the Line and Opo). There are also several dances (The Playful
    Porpoise, Over the Waves and Orca) where he sets up 1C side by side at
    the entry into the reels but doesn't specify 1C staying parallel but
    where, in my opinion, the dances would lend themselves to side by side
    reeling a la "Dancing Dolphins" even though it is not specified.
    
    
    Peter Price
    xxxxx.xxxxxxxxx@xxxxx.xxx
  • ...

    James Tween June 27, 2006, 8:19 p.m. (Message 45677, in reply to message 45675)

    So what are the reels called when it's purely follow-the-leader, no 
    changing?  That set up sounds more like what one might call tandem, but 
    that's just me.
    
    I'd always assumed that dolphin reels were called that because of Pelorus 
    Jack and the dolphin connection there, or is that wrong?  What are they 
    called in Flight of the Falcon?
    
    - James -
  • ...

    simon scott June 27, 2006, 8:39 p.m. (Message 45679, in reply to message 45677)

    So what are the reels called when it's purely follow-the-leader, no 
    changing?  That set up sounds more like what one might call tandem, but 
    that's just me.
    
    I'd always assumed that dolphin reels were called that because of Pelorus 
    Jack and the dolphin connection there, or is that wrong?  What are they 
    called in Flight of the Falcon?
    
    - James -
    
    
    I have always thought the same as James.
    
    "Reels of three" have different types: parallel, mirror, cross-over, right,
    left, full, half, tandem, etc.
    
    "Tandem reels" could then have dolphin and maybe other sub-types.
    
    Simon
    Vancouver
  • ...

    Pia Walker June 27, 2006, 9:12 p.m. (Message 45680, in reply to message 45679)

    Pillion reels :>)  - on a bicycle built for two - which is a ??????
    
    Pia
    Fife
  • ...

    James Tween June 28, 2006, 6:37 p.m. (Message 45690, in reply to message 45680)

    But there's no kind of bike where the back becomes the front every couple of 
    bars, is there?
    If I heard someone say "reels of three in tandem" or something, I'd go for 
    the follow-the-leader option.  How does "dolphin" even suggest swapping 
    over?
    I guess technically, the dancing couple are each doing parallel reels of 
    three on the same diagonal -- if the man begins in front, his reel is a 
    couple of steps longer at the end where he becomes the back, and a couple of 
    steps shorter when he becomes the front, and the lady's reel is similar but 
    at opposite ends.  However, "1C dance a reel of three in parallel on the 
    same axis" or something is stupidly daft.
    Fun, fun, fun!
    
    - James -
    Preston, UK
  • ...

    Pia Walker June 28, 2006, 6:53 p.m. (Message 45691, in reply to message 45690)

    Well think of it as someone out driving - the man is leading - and gets
    lost - so the women will have to navigate and then show how it is done -
    half way through the man thinks he has got it - and takes over again - and
    the same things happen - the woman has to save the day :>)  they all go
    round the roundabout and ends up almost where they started.
    
    Pia
  • ...

    Thomas G. Mungall, III June 28, 2006, 7:13 p.m. (Message 45692, in reply to message 45691)

    Pia,
    
    This has to be the funniest explanation of a dolphin reel ever! What a hoot!
    
    Tom Mungall
    Baton Rouge, La, USA
  • ...

    Carl Spain June 29, 2006, 12:29 a.m. (Message 45693, in reply to message 45690)

    On Wed, 2006-06-28 at 17:37 +0100, James Tween wrote:
    > But there's no kind of bike where the back becomes the front every couple of 
    > bars, is there?
    
    Not every few bars, and not by design, but there is such a bike.  We
    rented it on a recent vacation and I'm still nursing a sprained arm.
    
    Carl Spain
    Waco TX USA
  • ...

    Iain Boyd June 27, 2006, 11:26 p.m. (Message 45682, in reply to message 45677)

    James Tween <xxxxx.xxxxx@xxxxxx.xxx> wrote:  I'd always assumed that
    dolphin reels were called that because of Pelorus Jack and the dolphin
    connection there, or is that wrong? What are they called in Flight of
    the Falcon?
       
      The 'swap over' reels in "The Flight Of The Falcon" were not named
      by Barry Priddey - probably because this dance was the first dance
      to ever include this type of reel and Barry did not see the need to
      give them specific names!
       
      Regards,
       
      Iain Boyd
    
    
     Send instant messages to your online friends http://au.messenger.yahoo.com
  • ...

    Lee Fuell June 27, 2006, 8:38 p.m. (Message 45678, in reply to message 45675)

    In Flight of the Falcon, I've heard them referred to as falcon reels.
    Yet more potential for confusion, eh?
    
    Lee Fuell
    
    Beavercreek, OH, USA
    Arlington, VA, USA
  • ...

    Timothy Wilson June 28, 2006, 1:38 a.m. (Message 45684, in reply to message 45675)

    In my experience dancing in the San Francisco Branch, I have heard the reels 
    in the Dolphin Book most often referred to as "alternating tandem reels" or 
    "dolphin reels" during talk-throughs and teaching. Occasionally I have heard 
    the other term that Ron mentioned of "tandem reels in which the lead changes 
    or alternates." Some local teachers use "tandem reel" to describe the 
    follow-the-leader reel though I think I have heard "shadow reel" (as Lara 
    noted) more frequently used--perhaps to avoid confusion.
    
    I have learned, and danced, The Dancing Dolphins but do not recall a special 
    emphasis on the 1st couple dancing in a parallel alignment relative to the 
    set. Obviously I should take another look at that dance. Thanks for your 
    careful reading Peter.
    
    I have to laugh though. We've got "falcon" reels and "dolphin" reels which 
    must mean that most of our reels are neither fish nor fowl. (And, yes, I 
    _am_ aware that a dolphin is not a fish). Perhaps we can add "haring 
    reels"--for when at least one dancer goes off on their own--or better yet 
    "red herring reels" when one dancer follows a cue that sends him or her in 
    the wrong direction.
    
    Cheers,
    Tim Wilson
    San Francisco, CA
  • ...

    Peter McClure June 28, 2006, 3:28 a.m. (Message 45685, in reply to message 45675)

    >In Flight of the Falcon, I've heard them referred to as falcon 
    >reels.  Yet more potential for confusion, eh?
    >
    >Lee Fuell
    >
    >Beavercreek, OH, USA
    >Arlington, VA, USA
    
    
    And let's not overlook Duncan Keppie's "hand-in-hand" reels, which 
    seem to me to be a part of this whole stramash.
    
    Peter McClure
    Winnipeg, MB
  • ...

    Alan Paterson June 28, 2006, 8:29 a.m. (Message 45686, in reply to message 45675)

    Just to muddy things up a bit...
    
    Is anyone familiar with Duncan Keppie's Reels "Hand-in-hand"?
    
    These seem to me to be what "Dolphin" Reels (as described by Peter) are 
    - with the difference that the couple take nearer hands where possible 
    (and are not always strictly in a line across the set).
    
    I believe Duncan brought this in in his Book 8 which came out in 1998
    
    
    Alan
    Berne, Switzerland
  • ...

    Lydia Hedge June 28, 2006, 10:37 a.m. (Message 45687, in reply to message 45686)

    > Is anyone familiar with Duncan Keppie's Reels "Hand-in-hand"?
    I have written to Duncan to see whether he will reply directly to this query.
    
    Lydia
    Nova Scotia
  • ...

    James Tween June 29, 2006, 9:58 p.m. (Message 45698, in reply to message 45675)

    This came to me direct rather than to the list, but it's another part
    of this discussion, so ...
  • ...

    Ian Brockbank June 29, 2006, 10:33 p.m. (Message 45699, in reply to message 45698)

    Dick Daniel wrote:
    
    > This is all another prime example of the product of our 
    > highly paid professionals at RSCDS HQ in Edinburgh applying 
    > their superior intellects.
    
    Er, sorry, what highly paid professionals?  As far as I'm
    aware, apart from the office staff who do administration
    and sales, everyone's a volunteer.  If you don't like what's
    being decided, get yourself elected onto one of the committees.
    
    Cheers,
    
    Ian Brockbank
    Edinburgh, Scotland
    xxx@xxxxxxxxxxxxx.xxx
    http://www.scottishdance.net/
  • ...

    Peter Price June 30, 2006, 11:38 p.m. (Message 45703, in reply to message 45675)

    I am finally getting a sense of the issue.
    
    Headquarters has set a definition (of the reels in Pelorus Jack) in
    concrete and there is disagreement.
    
    My take on the matter is this-
    per my dictionary the reels in Pelorus Jack can be classified as
    Tandem reels- with the variation of lead change. That is what is so
    and therefore I have no problem teaching those reels as "tandem reels
    with lead changes" per the new manual (which I haven't seen).
    
    I have not seen Barry Priddey's dance "Flying Falcon" either, but from
    the tenor of the thread they would be the same as those found in The
    Capercaillie and Land of the Heather Hills (The Capercaillie Book). I
    would teach these as Tandem reels with lead change also.
    
    Headquarter's definition of the reels preempts any issue of who
    invented the reel first, and the question of "is it really a Flying
    Falcon reel or a Dolphin Reel" is moot.
    
    However one question has not been answered. In The Dolphin Book, Barry
    Skelton has two different kinds of reels. First there are those that
    qualify as "tandem reels with lead change" as in Pelorus Jack. in
    these dances he carefully sets up the reels by specifying that one
    dancer falls in closely behind the other- i.e. in tandem.
    
    There is a dance where he is very specific in having first couple
    finish side by side and that the couple keeps parallel with the axis
    of the set throughout the reel ( i.e. Dancing Dolphins). These are NOT
    tandem reels - 1M and 1W are dancing on two distinctly separate tracks
    that cross each other in four places (on each side of the loops). So,
    what do we call THIS reel - if anything?
    
    And now the real fun begins-
    there are several dances where BS is not specific. Where he says
    something like  "first couple finish in the middle facing up" and we
    do not know if that is side by side or with one behind the other.
    
    Take a look at #2 -The Playful Porpoise
    To my eye the reels here can be danced either as "tandem reels with
    lead change" or as the reels in Dancing Dolphins are danced. Both
    interpretations are possible and reasonable.
    
    The difference between the two kinds of reels is at the crossing point
    when moving between the two loops- in a tandem reel the dancers cross
    in sequence (one after the other) while in the parallel reel the
    dancers are crossing at the same time, side by side.
    
    Comments anyone?
  • ...

    James Tween July 1, 2006, 12:02 a.m. (Message 45704, in reply to message 45703)

    I've only read Dancing Dolphins in Minicrib, but why aren't the reels of 
    three in bars 9-24 like the reels in Pelorus Jack?  I know the PJ reels are 
    diagonal and only half reels, and they begin with the man leading, but the 
    DD reels appear to have essentially the same type of movement as PJ reels --  
    DD seems to have reels of three (on the sides) with 1C dancing as one unit, 
    changing the leader at each end.  As I say, I've only got a secondary 
    source, but it just looks to me like PJ-type reels but done on the sides 
    rather than the diagonal, and full reels rather than halves.
    
    - James -
    Preston, UK
  • ...

    Peter Price July 1, 2006, 1:02 a.m. (Message 45705, in reply to message 45704)

    The difference is based on the specific directions in the 3rd footnote
    and the last line of the directions to bars 1-8.
    
    quote:
    1-8     first couple, cross with the right hand and cast off one place.
              (Second couple step up on bars 3 & 4.) First couple turn each
              other with the left hand 1-1/4 times. First couple finish facing the
              lady's side, the man has his partner on his right.***
    end quote
    
    quote
    ***Note: First couple should begin the reel parallel with the side of the
    set AND REMAIN PARALLEL  with the set throughout the reel. This will
    require good covering. First couple must be aware of their partner
    especially on the turns. First couple cover with each other NOT JUST
    FOLLOW each other. Where the instructions say follow also read cover.
    End quote
    (my emphasis added)
    
    The important points-
    -first couple finish side by side (bar 8)
    -the COUPLE stays parallel with the side of the set (axis of the reel)
    therefore they are not in tandem but are dancing their own individual
    tracks.
    -whenever the couple crosses the axis of the reel (at the ends AND in
    the middle) they are side by side i.e. not in tandem.
    
    See my opening email that restarted the dolphin reel "thing" for a
    fuller breakdown.
    
    Peter Price
    New Haven, CT
    USA

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