Thread Index

Playing for SCD

Previous Thread Next Thread Indented

  • ...

    RODERICK JOHNSTON June 11, 2006, 4:28 p.m. (Message 45508)

    As a new member, you may recall, I asked for information on the Summer
    School Musicians Course and you were all very helpful especially in
    explaining that the course was teatotal !!!!.
       
      One of you questioned whether or not one should play from memory or
      by ear and asked my views.
       
      Personally, having returned to playing after a very long break, I
      now find it quite difficult remembering tunes and sets, especially
      for RSCDs, as there are so many of them.     I wouldn't risk playing
      from memory for a SCD dance in fear of making a mistake and ruining
      the dance.     For a ceilidh you could get away with it as it's a
      lot less serious.     I find that many tunes are similar and I could
      quite easily start one tune and half way through change to another.
      I suspect that a lot has to do with the fact I was trained
      classically, through the BCA, and at that time playing by ear was
      wasn't allowed nor was the playing of Scottish traditional music.
      How times have changed.
       
      I say this because I am currently learning the small pipes and find
      that I am able to play by ear and have no trouble remembering the
      tunes.
       
      I received the music for the course last week and there are some
      interesting sets but must get used to the alternative playing order
      as I am more used to playing AA,BB,CC,DD or A,BB,CC,DD,A.
       
      Rod Johnston
  • ...

    Pia Walker June 11, 2006, 10:51 p.m. (Message 45510, in reply to message 45508)

    Xuse me Mr Rod - I am one of the tea-totals!!! - does this mean that one
    have to look out for you during the summer, or can one contribute bum-notes
    to someone else?
    
    Pia- who will look/sound out everone
    
    Pia
  • ...

    Pia Walker June 11, 2006, 11:04 p.m. (Message 45511, in reply to message 45510)

    Misunderstanding not attributed to the bottle of red wine one has just been
    forced to partake due to guest in back garden and really fantastic summer
    weather in Scotland.
    
    Pia
  • ...

    RODERICK JOHNSTON June 11, 2006, 11:12 p.m. (Message 45512, in reply to message 45510)

    I do enjoy the occasional malt, purely for medicinal purposes, you understand.  
      I'm sure I'll contribute as many bum hotes as the rest, unless of
      course you are all professionals?.  I hope to enjoy this course and
      have as much fun as possible.  Are we allowed to take part in the
      evening dance sessions?
    
    Pia <xxx@xxxxxxxx.xxx> wrote:
      
    Xuse me Mr Rod - I am one of the tea-totals!!! - does this mean that one
    have to look out for you during the summer, or can one contribute bum-notes
    to someone else?
    
    Pia- who will look/sound out everone
    
    Pia
  • ...

    Margaret Lambourne June 11, 2006, 11:25 p.m. (Message 45513, in reply to message 45512)

    Anyone who is either on the dancing or music course is allowed to dance 
    in the evenings. They are purely teatotal (not kidding) but afterwards 
    is a different matter.
    
    Margaret who is there week 3
  • ...

    Ron Mackey June 12, 2006, 12:52 a.m. (Message 45514, in reply to message 45510)

    > 
    > Xuse me Mr Rod - I am one of the tea-totals!!!
    
     - does this mean that one ..........
    
    My goodness!! That first phrase was a shock!!!   :))
  • ...

    Pia Walker June 12, 2006, 10:14 a.m. (Message 45522, in reply to message 45514)

    I like you too
    
    Pia
  • ...

    John Mccain June 12, 2006, 4:58 a.m. (Message 45517, in reply to message 45508)

    On Jun 11, 2006, at 9:28 AM, RODERICK JOHNSTON wrote:
    
    >   I received the music for the course last week and there are some 
    > interesting sets but must get used to the alternative playing order as 
    > I am more used to playing AA,BB,CC,DD or A,BB,CC,DD,A.
    
    
    What is the order of the sets for the course? And, how does your group 
    like dancing to smallpipes?
    
    Best, John
  • ...

    RODERICK JOHNSTON June 12, 2006, 7:54 p.m. (Message 45528, in reply to message 45517)

    Course sets are maily ABCDBCDA.
      I've only had the small pipes about a month and wouldnt dare playing them inpublic yet.
       
      Rod 
    
    John McCain <xxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxx.xxx> wrote:
      On Jun 11, 2006, at 9:28 AM, RODERICK JOHNSTON wrote:
    
    > I received the music for the course last week and there are some 
    > interesting sets but must get used to the alternative playing order as 
    > I am more used to playing AA,BB,CC,DD or A,BB,CC,DD,A.
    
    
    What is the order of the sets for the course? And, how does your group 
    like dancing to smallpipes?
    
    Best, John
  • ...

    Steve Wyrick June 12, 2006, 6:58 a.m. (Message 45518, in reply to message 45508)

    RODERICK JOHNSTON wrote:
    
    >   Personally, having returned to playing after a very long break, I now find
    > it quite difficult remembering tunes and sets, especially for RSCDs, as there
    > are so many of them.     I wouldn't risk playing from memory for a SCD dance
    > in fear of making a mistake and ruining the dance.     For a ceilidh you could
    > get away with it as it's a lot less serious.     I find that many tunes are
    > similar and I could quite easily start one tune and half way through change to
    > another.     I suspect that a lot has to do with the fact I was trained
    > classically, through the BCA, and at that time playing by ear was wasn't
    > allowed nor was the playing of Scottish traditional music.    How times have
    > changed.
    >    
    >   I say this because I am currently learning the small pipes and find that I
    > am able to play by ear and have no trouble remembering the tunes.
    >    
    >   I received the music for the course last week and there are some interesting
    > sets but must get used to the alternative playing order as I am more used to
    > playing AA,BB,CC,DD or A,BB,CC,DD,A.
    
    Here in the San Francisco Branch the only musician I've encountered that
    plays without music for Scottish country dances is Alasdair Fraser, and even
    he is prone to forgetting the order of tunes in a set or jumping
    unexpectedly into a different but similar tune; it takes a good pianist to
    keep up with him!  Even if one had memorized all the tunes in an evening's
    dance the convention of changing tunes after each repetition (ABCDBCDA is
    the most common order here for 4 tunes played 8x) makes it difficult to keep
    track of the repetitions without music to refer to. -Steve
    -- 
    Steve Wyrick -- Concord, California
  • ...

    Anselm Lingnau June 12, 2006, 11:14 a.m. (Message 45523, in reply to message 45518)

    Steve Wyrick:
    
    > Here in the San Francisco Branch the only musician I've encountered that
    > plays without music for Scottish country dances is Alasdair Fraser, and
    > even he is prone to forgetting the order of tunes in a set or jumping
    > unexpectedly into a different but similar tune; it takes a good pianist to
    > keep up with him!
    
    I've been told some time ago (by Bill Zobel, who ought to know) that when 
    Alasdair Fraser plays for a dance together with Muriel Johnstone, they have 
    just a big sheet of music that gives the first bars of the various tunes to 
    be played. Sigh.
    
    Unfortunately as far as I know Muriel no longer subscribes to the list, so 
    this is all hearsay.
    
    Anselm
    -- 
    Anselm Lingnau, Frankfurt, Germany ..................... xxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx
    The grand essentials of happiness are: something to do, something to love, and
    something to hope for.                                    -- Allan K. Chalmers
  • ...

    Ozorak June 12, 2006, 2:34 p.m. (Message 45525, in reply to message 45523)

    There's a big difference also when you have a number of musicians playing
    the lead.  It's much easier to go with one's own interpretation when there
    is a solo lead instrument, but when you have more than one, there has to
    be a way to keep everyone playing on the same page.  I've gotten used to
    having three lead instruments and I don't see how you could get everyone
    to stay on the lead without music (unless yu play the same music all the
    time).
    
    Etienne Ozorak
    Meadville PA  USA
  • ...

    RODERICK JOHNSTON June 12, 2006, 7:48 p.m. (Message 45527, in reply to message 45525)

    I have great admiration for those who play by ear and those who can
    remember vast quantities of tunes.  I attended a weekend course on
    Sabhl Ostaig on Skye given by Sandy Brechin some years ago.     It was
    amazing to see young musicians who had been taught purely by ear
    listen to a tune played through once then play it back perfectly.  A
    very humbling experience.
       
      Rod 
    
    Etienne Ozorak <xxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxx.xxx> wrote:
      There's a big difference also when you have a number of musicians playing
    the lead. It's much easier to go with one's own interpretation when there
    is a solo lead instrument, but when you have more than one, there has to
    be a way to keep everyone playing on the same page. I've gotten used to
    having three lead instruments and I don't see how you could get everyone
    to stay on the lead without music (unless yu play the same music all the
    time).
    
    Etienne Ozorak
    Meadville PA USA

Previous Thread Next Thread