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Copying Cassettes onto CD

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  • ...

    Alan Paterson May 18, 2006, 3:13 p.m. (Message 45309)

    I still have about 40 MCs of SCD music which never really gets an airing 
    since I always just take my CD collection to classes (I haven't managed 
    to make the jump to laptop-stored MP3 yet).
    
    I would very much like to be able to copy the contents of these tapes 
    onto CD.
    
    I do have a computer which is able to burn CDs so what I understand that 
    I need to be able to do is to play the tapes into the computer and 
    isolate the tracks.
    
    Has anyone out there done anything like this? If so, are there any hints 
    about either of these tasks? In paricular is there any (cheap!) software 
    to manipulate the individual tracks before burning them?
    
    Replies can be made directly (xxxx@xxxxxxxx.xx) or to the List. Up to you.
    
    
    Alan
  • ...

    Eike Albert-Unt May 18, 2006, 3:15 p.m. (Message 45310, in reply to message 45309)

    Preferably to the list. :-) Thanks!
    
    With best regards,
    Eike
    (facing the same kind of challenges)
  • ...

    Kent Smith May 18, 2006, 3:21 p.m. (Message 45311, in reply to message 45309)

    I, for one, would appreciate also reading the answers, so I hope you'll
    decide to reply to the list.
    
       Thanks,
       Kent, West Hartford, Connecticut, USA
  • ...

    Martin May 18, 2006, 3:27 p.m. (Message 45312, in reply to message 45309)

    Alan Paterson wrote:
    > I still have about 40 MCs of SCD music...
    > I would very much like to be able to copy  onto CD.
    
    Been reading my thoughts , Alan?
    
    > In paricular is there any (cheap!) software 
    > to manipulate the individual tracks before burning them?
    
    Audacity, free download from Soundforge.
    
    > Replies can be made ... to the List. 
    please !!!
    
    Martin
  • ...

    Bob McLatchie May 18, 2006, 6 p.m. (Message 45319, in reply to message 45312)

    I certainly endorse Martin's recommendation for Audacity. I have used it
    for this purpose - and for creating 3x through versions for demos etc.
    It allows me to do all the editing I want - picking out or putting in
    chords, amplifying the signal, even changing the speed without altering
    pitch.
    
    I use it under Linux (Mandiva) but it is also available for Windows and
    Mac.
    
    I would also endorse Loretta's comment that this all takes time so if
    you can find a CD (or MP3) version of your cassette, I suggest you buy
    it.
    
    Regards
    
    Bob
    Oxfordshire, England
  • ...

    Loretta Holz May 18, 2006, 3:25 p.m. (Message 45313, in reply to message 45309)

    Alan asked--
     > I would very much like to be able to copy the contents of these tapes
    > onto CD.
    
    Alan--
    I've transferred a lot of music from tape to CD.  It is a time intensive job
    so if you can buy the CD for the same music then buy it.
    If not, then you need a program like Sound Forge.  The music must be played
    on a cassette player hooked into the computer to create one file per side of
    the cassette (you can play the tunes indiviidually and make separate files
    but I found it easier just to let the whole cassette play one side).  After
    you have the file of multiple tunes, you need to go in Sound Forge and break
    it apart into separate tunes, fix as required, name and store the file
    (format you select).  Then you can make CDs out of these files.
    
    If you want more detail, ask questions.
    
    Loretta
    
    Loretta Holz
    Warren, NJ USA
  • ...

    suepetyt May 18, 2006, 3:30 p.m. (Message 45314, in reply to message 45313)

    We have used Polderbit, it costs a few pounds but is extremely versatile as
    you can also edit the sound track in it (add or remove chords!)
    
    Happy Dancing
    Sue Petyt
    www.suepetyt.me.uk 
    Skype Sue Petyt
  • ...

    Jane Hewitt May 18, 2006, 3:57 p.m. (Message 45316, in reply to message 45313)

    Alan asked--
     > I would very much like to be able to copy the contents of these tapes
    > onto CD.
    
    Alan--
    The programme I use is MusicMatch JukeBox
    Jane Hewott
    Pietermaritzburg
    South Africa
  • ...

    Alasdair Graham May 18, 2006, 3:58 p.m. (Message 45317, in reply to message 45309)

    Alan,
    
    This website has a step by step using the Audacity software, which was also 
    recommended in a recent computer magazine article for transferring music 
    from whatever source to CD.
    
    http://www.sticksite.com/tape2cd/
    
    Alasdair Graham
    Dumbarton, Scotland
  • ...

    Eric Clyde May 18, 2006, 4:50 p.m. (Message 45318, in reply to message 45309)

    Alan:
    I have been using Total Recorder, Standard Edition, from 
    www.highcriteria.com, for a number of years now.  It costs $17.95 (U.S.) 
    and this includes future updates to the program.  I have transferred 
    some LPs and quite a few tapes to CD, although I now have the separate 
    tracks on my laptop for use in class.
    
    The program is easy to use.  You will need a cable to hook up the 
    earphone jack of your cassette player to the input jack on the sound 
    card of your computer.  Start the computer program and the cassette 
    player and make sure that the volume level is not too high or you may 
    get distortion.  When you have copied a side (of the tape or LP) it is 
    easy to save each dance selection separately, either as .wav files 
    (recommended if you are going to transfer to CD) or .mp3 files (which 
    are not as high quality, but take up much less space on your hard 
    disk).  Note that you will have to give each selection a name -- if you 
    want them in the same order as on the tape, then "1", "2", "3" etc. 
    would be fine.
    
    To transfer the tracks to CD, I use Windows Media Player (free), 
    although there are lots of other programs available.  Insert a CD-R into 
    your CD writer, choose the program you want to do the copying, point to 
    the directory with the selections in it, highlight the selections, and copy.
    
    It sounds complicated, but it's actually quite straightforward.
    
    Eric
  • ...

    Brian Charlton May 19, 2006, 2:02 a.m. (Message 45320, in reply to message 45309)

    G'Day, All,
    
    I have transferred a lot of my cassettes (usually copies of LPs) onto CD.
    The programme I have used is CoolEdit, which was shareware, but has not been
    bought out by Adobe and sold on as Audition (at a much increased price!). I
    have also tried Audacity, which has the benefit of being free and is just as
    capable as CoolEdit.
    
    To do the job completely requires a significant amount of time. Cassettes
    generally have background hum and other noises and it is preferable to
    remove this noise from the tracks. The technique is to sample a part of the
    'silent' area (between tracks) to establish the background noise profile,
    then apply that profile to the whole side.
    
    After noise reduction, the tracks should be normalised so that all tracks
    have the same sound setting.
    
    Splitting the tracks is easy. Highlight one track and copy the highlighted
    area to the clipboard. Open a new file and copy the clipboard into the new
    file. Save the file with the name of the dance. You can save as a wave file
    or MP3, WMA or whatever you prefer.
    
    Brian Charlton,
    Sydney, Australia
  • ...

    Martin May 19, 2006, 8:51 a.m. (Message 45322, in reply to message 45320)

    I assumped Alan's problem was the same as mine, ie: how to get the music
    into the computer.
    Mine has no input socket to plug the recorder into. It has all sorts of
    odd-shaped holes around the edges, but nothing that will take a jack --
    except for output to loudspeakers (Mac ibook).
    
    Actually, iI have managed to find a socket labeled microphone on my
    older windows laptop.
    Unfortunately, the CD player on that model stopped working a few days
    after the guarantee expired!
    
    Martin
  • ...

    Anselm Lingnau May 19, 2006, 9:09 a.m. (Message 45324, in reply to message 45322)

    Martin Sheffield wrote:
    
    > Actually, iI have managed to find a socket labeled microphone on my
    > older windows laptop.
    > Unfortunately, the CD player on that model stopped working a few days
    > after the guarantee expired!
    
    You can't drive a microphone input from a tape recorder output -- the 
    microphone input is designed to pick up signals that are far weaker than what 
    the tape recorder produces (which is called »line level«) and would be 
    terribly overdriven if not damaged.
    
    The sound cards for stationary PCs usually feature line inputs, but on a 
    notebook, you're pretty much out of luck. Your best bet if you're really into 
    this would be to try and obtain an external sound module based on, e.g., USB 
    or (more likely, on a Mac) FireWire (IEEE 1394). These are available at 
    prices ranging from the not exactly cheap to the utterly astronomical (for 
    professionals' use). Their advantage is that, at least for the somewhat 
    better ones, the quality they produce is usually way beyond that of anything 
    built directly into a PC, as the inside of a PC is not a particularly 
    suitable environment for converting analogue signals to digital without 
    picking up all kinds of distortion. (Although, if your original input comes 
    from cassette tapes, this may not really matter -- owing to the way tapes 
    work, their quality isn't usually that great to begin with.)
    
    Anselm
    -- 
    Anselm Lingnau, Frankfurt, Germany ..................... xxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx
    There is no such thing as an underestimate of average intelligence.
                                                                    -- Henry Adams
  • ...

    Brian Charlton May 19, 2006, 9:15 a.m. (Message 45325, in reply to message 45322)

    G'Day,
    
    Martin may be right, Wintel computer motherboards usually have a sound
    capability built-in, with a line-in socket as well as microphone and
    line-out. These are usually hidden rounfd the back of the box. The sockets
    are 3mm jack plug and are colour-coded - Line-in is blue, mic is red and
    line-out green. The connection is the headphones out of a cassette player
    into the line-in on the computer box. The recording software used should be
    able to find it without trouble, but you may have to set Sounds and Audio
    Devices in Control Panel to accept line-in recording.
    
    I hope this helps,
    
    Brian Charlton,
    Sydney, Australia
  • ...

    Don MacQueen May 23, 2006, 3:16 a.m. (Message 45347, in reply to message 45322)

    Martin,
    
    Probably the least expensive solution for getting sound into an iBook 
    is the Griffin iMic 
    (http://www.griffintechnology.com/products/imic2/index.php ). It has 
    a place to plug in a standard audio jack, converts to USB, whereupon 
    (I assume) drivers that you install make it into something the audio 
    software can deal with.  US$ 40. It also includes software, Finyl 
    Vinyl, for doing the recording, and (I would guess) splitting into 
    tracks.
    
    -Don
    
    At 8:51 AM +0200 5/19/06, Martin Sheffield wrote:
    >I assumped Alan's problem was the same as mine, ie: how to get the music
    >into the computer.
    >Mine has no input socket to plug the recorder into. It has all sorts of
    >odd-shaped holes around the edges, but nothing that will take a jack --
    >except for output to loudspeakers (Mac ibook).
    >
    >Actually, iI have managed to find a socket labeled microphone on my
    >older windows laptop.
    >Unfortunately, the CD player on that model stopped working a few days
    >after the guarantee expired!
    >
    >Martin
    
    
    -- 
    -------------------------
    Don MacQueen
    xxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx
    California, USA
    -------------------------
  • ...

    Tappan May 24, 2006, 2:18 a.m. (Message 45361, in reply to message 45347)

    Don MacQueen wrote,
    
    >Probably the least expensive solution for getting sound into an 
    >iBook is the Griffin iMic 
    >(http://www.griffintechnology.com/products/imic2/index.php ). It has 
    >a place to plug in a standard audio jack, converts to USB, whereupon 
    >(I assume) drivers that you install make it into something the audio 
    >software can deal with.  US$ 40. It also includes software, Finyl 
    >Vinyl, for doing the recording, and (I would guess) splitting into 
    >tracks.
    
    My daughter uses the iMic. I have one, but haven't tried it. Here's 
    what she told me about how to do it - for what it's worth. I have an 
    iMac, not PC, so don't know if the process is even remotely similar. 
    It may help someone, though.
    
    Jan Tappan - directions below:
    For this kind of thing, brian and I use Audio Hijack 
    http://www.rogueamoeba.com/audiohijack/ and an iMic. 
    http://www.griffintechnology.com/products/imic/
    
    Set up Audio Hijack so it's recording the sound from your USB port, 
    plug the iMic into the headphone jack of a cassette player using a 
    double-male minijack cable, plug the iMic into the USB port and play 
    the cassette into the computer. You'll have to do the track 
    separations either as you record in real time, recording a separate 
    file for each track and stopping in between, or by editing the larger 
    file after you're done recording using MP3 trimmer.
    http://www.deepniner.net/mp3trimmer/
      (you'll have to convert the Audio Hijack file into MP3 before you do 
    that, and iTunes can do that handily.)
  • ...

    Angus Henry May 19, 2006, 5:40 a.m. (Message 45321, in reply to message 45309)

    If you use a Mac (the machine for creativity!) let me know and I can  
    help - otherwise there are plenty of Bill Gates subscribers who will  
    know what to do with the other boxes    :-)
    
    Angus
  • ...

    T L Harris May 19, 2006, 9:32 a.m. (Message 45326, in reply to message 45309)

    Hi Alan,
     
    I have a friend who's doing our club's tape to CD transfers. He uses
    DC Live, which is a professional programme (the slightly more advanced
    version of which is used by the FBI). He achieves wonders with old and
    noisy tapes.
     
    He also recommends Audition (which is freeware) and Cool Edit (which
    has now been taken over by another company, so may now have another
    name).
     
    Regards,
    Terry Lynne Harris
    Pretoria
    South Africa
  • ...

    Pia Walker May 19, 2006, 9:51 a.m. (Message 45328, in reply to message 45326)

    This discussion has been quite interesting
    
    If you are already established, why not invest in new music on CD as you go
    along, and then donate the tapes to new dance groups etc who could do with a
    helping hand in the beginning until they have a better foothold.
    
    Just an idea
    
    Pia
    
    --
    No virus found in this outgoing message.
    Checked by AVG Free Edition.
    Version: 7.1.392 / Virus Database: 268.6.0/341 - Release Date: 16/05/2006
  • ...

    Margaret Lambourne May 19, 2006, 11:30 a.m. (Message 45329, in reply to message 45328)

    Pia,
    
    I will go through all my cassettes and those I have already transferred 
    to cd I will bring to summer school and give them to you to pass on to 
    new groups through the IB.
    
    Margaret
  • ...

    Pia Walker May 19, 2006, 12:31 p.m. (Message 45330, in reply to message 45329)

    That's wonderful - thanks
  • ...

    Ron Mackey May 20, 2006, 1:10 a.m. (Message 45332, in reply to message 45328)

    > If you are already established, why not invest in new music on CD as you go
    > along, and then donate the tapes to new dance groups etc who could do with a
    > helping hand in the beginning until they have a better foothold.
    > 
    > Just an idea
    > 
    > Pia
    
    	I think many of us are loth to discard some of the superb 
    tracks of the past music masters.  Also there are any older dances 
    for which there is no new music.
    	Now we get back to 'any suitable ... '
  • ...

    Pia Walker May 20, 2006, 2:21 p.m. (Message 45334, in reply to message 45332)

    Well I was thinking more in the style of reissued music now on CD - and
    somebody also kindly let me know that if people copied onto CD, and gave
    their tapes away, there may be a copyright issue.   So perhaps I just opened
    my mouth to let my belly rumble :>)
    
    I still think that we should help new groups though.
    
    Pia
  • ...

    Brian Charlton May 20, 2006, 3:30 a.m. (Message 45333, in reply to message 45326)

    G'Day,
    
    As I stated in my earlier email, the freeware is Audacity. CoolEdit was
    bought out by Adobe and re-issued as Audition.
    
    Brian Charlton
  • ...

    Gordon Reynolds May 20, 2006, 9:52 p.m. (Message 45335, in reply to message 45309)

    Hi.  Further to Anselm's comments about notebooks, if you have a
    PCMCIA slot then Creative now have an Audigy 2 ZS Notebook card that
    you can use to input/output sound (Advertised at NZ$215.00) which will
    add all the connections you need.
    
    The notebook could then be used to transcribe from tape to CD but the
    desktop is easier to use. However for playback, if you have good music
    files and speakers you can provide excellent sound using the 2ZS.
    
    Gordon
  • ...

    T L Harris May 22, 2006, 8:07 a.m. (Message 45340, in reply to message 45309)

    Thanks for the correction, Brian. I only saw your earlier email after
    I'd pressed Send om mine. Sorry I got my names muddled.
     
    Terry Lynne Harris
    Pretoria
    South Africa
    
    >>> xxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxxxx.xxx 20-05-06 03:30 >>>
    G'Day,
    
    As I stated in my earlier email, the freeware is Audacity. CoolEdit
    was bought out by Adobe and re-issued as Audition.
    
    Brian Charlton

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