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    simon scott March 22, 2006, 6:41 p.m. (Message 44840)

    By far the majority of SCD issues I agree with or accept. As you can
    tell I have strong feelings opposing two chords in these type of dances.
    But you may be tired of seeing my name pop up on the matter so I'll
    "try" to resist further comment and move on.  What's next?  Should there
    be two chords at the end so that they can change back! !
    
    Cheers Simon
    Vancouver
  • ...

    GOSS9@telefonica.net March 23, 2006, 7:52 a.m. (Message 44855, in reply to message 44840)

    Personally, I agree, and prefer that instead of two chords, simply a 
    longer (as in 4 bar) intro. 
    
    I think the bowing and moving, which started out as a simple polite 
    recognition unrelated to any dance, has gotten out of hand. The two 
    chords sound strict and militaristic, by the numbers. With a 4 bar 
    intro, those less rigid will know that they have time to acknowledge 
    both partners, and those with the "by the numbers dem team" bent, can 
    still have their bow, by the numbers. To me, if the bow is supposed to 
    be a form of acknowledgement before the dance, then having everyone, 
    covering perfectly going down and up, has certain element of sincerity. 
    In [my] the old days, after sporting events the teams would cluster and 
    exchange hand shakes, some did, some didn´t, some had more enthusiasm 
    then others. If you go to some highschool games now, the two teams line 
    up and march past each other touching hands, often not even 
    acknowledging the other. Regimenting a social grace often takes away 
    its meaning.
    
    I feel that the source of the problem has more to do with the 
    evolution of RSCDS-country dancing then any historical or necessary 
    process. Because the early society chose not to follow some of the 
    EFDSS conventions, it ignored an entire corpus of country dances, 
    ironicly caused "ecossaise" in some sources. The EFDSS term is simply 
    called "longways improper". The MC solution is simple, when announcing 
    the dance, just as one would say "form square sets for x", could say 
    "form sets, longways imporper for say "Glasgow Highlanders".

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