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    ParadiseMO March 7, 2006, 8:14 p.m. (Message 44535)

    According to the Online Etymology Dictionary, "emcee" entered the English  
    language in 1933 - _http://www.etymonline.com/index.php_ 
    (http://www.etymonline.com/index.php) 
     
    DOUG SCHNEIDER
    Who entered the world in 1943
  • ...

    Andrea Re March 8, 2006, 1:36 a.m. (Message 44543, in reply to message 44535)

    For Fiona and the others who wondered.... here are my 2 cents on the 
    development of the English language (and I beg your pardon to start with).
    
    1) The English language, on both sides of the Atlantic has an obsession 
    about shortening words and creating acronyms of compound words. The same 
    does not apply to, for example, romance languages. Certainly not to 
    Italian, nor, as far as I know, French or Spanish. There are hypothesis 
    as to why the English language has this tendency, but let's not get too 
    technical (and it is late at night)
    
    2) In creating shorter words or, even worst, acronyms, people tend to 
    forget what the abbreviation stands for. Even easy things like QC (or 
    even better KC) are lost to most people. Working as a translator I can 
    assure you that acronyms can make any text unintelligible, unless you 
    are one of the chosen few who know what the letters stand for.
    
    3) Since the origin of the word is quickly lost, the acronym becomes a 
    word in its own right and in doing so it will have to be spelled one way 
    or another, hence "emcee". I'll try and think of similar transformations 
    and keep u posted.
    Former acronyms could be: laser, sonar, ram and so on, but they are not 
    as interesting since the spelling has not changed.
    
    Andrea (fae Dundee, but not an Englishe native speakereh)
  • ...

    Strathspey March 8, 2006, 6:26 p.m. (Message 44576, in reply to message 44543)

    Acronym's have been the bane of my life since I joined the IT department at
    work where everything is referred to in Acronyms. I had to get to grips with
    the PID, SOR, BRD, FRS, SDS etc. etc. etc.
    
    The lowest point was when I sat through a whole hour of a meeting puzzling
    over the chairman's first sentence: "And we will need a TLA for this
    product!"
    
    "TLA? TLA?" I thought. "Trans-Lunar Altitude? Terminal Language Application?
    Tired, Listless and Apathetic?"
    
    I eventually worked out that TLA meant "Three Letter Acronym"
    
    TTFN (that's an FLA no doubt!)
    
    Graham Hamilton
  • ...

    Alexandre Rafalovitch March 8, 2006, 6:35 p.m. (Message 44577, in reply to message 44576)

    And when you thought you mastered them all, there come the smileys. :-)
    
    Regards,
       Alex
    P.s. TLA (three-letter-acronym) was at one point a self referential
    joke, the same way Linux operating system could be interpreted as
    Linux Is Not UniX.....
  • ...

    Ron Mackey March 9, 2006, 12:19 a.m. (Message 44592, in reply to message 44576)

    > TTFN (that's an FLA no doubt!)
    > 
    > Graham Hamilton
    
    	That was a tactical error, Graham.  I thought you were younger 
    than that?   :))
    
    Regards, Ron
  • ...

    SMiskoe March 8, 2006, 4:08 a.m. (Message 44548, in reply to message 44535)

    In a message dated 3/7/2006 7:38:29 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,  
    xxxxxx.xx@xxxxxx.xxx writes:
    
    Even  easy things like QC (or 
    even better KC) are lost to most  people
    
    
    QC to means quality control.  Where does the K come in?
    Sylvia Miskoe, Concord, NH USA
  • ...

    Remco Viëtor March 8, 2006, 9:20 a.m. (Message 44549, in reply to message 44548)

    On Wednesday 08 March 2006 04:08, xxxxxxx@xxx.xxx wrote:
    > In a message dated 3/7/2006 7:38:29 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
    > xxxxxx.xx@xxxxxx.xxx writes:
    >
    > Even  easy things like QC (or
    > even better KC) are lost to most  people
    >
    >
    > QC to means quality control.  Where does the K come in?
    > Sylvia Miskoe, Concord, NH USA
    
    King's council/Queen's council?
    (just a foreigner's guess :)
    
    Remco
  • ...

    Pia Walker March 8, 2006, 10:45 a.m. (Message 44559, in reply to message 44549)

    Okay - what have we got: rescedee, pdb, IPF(t)A - eipeeftea - any other?
    (ao)
    The best one I know is swedish where a managing director is abbreviated to
    VD
    
    Pia
  • ...

    Sophie Rickebusch March 8, 2006, 11:33 a.m. (Message 44562, in reply to message 44559)

    Quoting Pia <xxx@xxxxxxxx.xxx>:
    
    > The best one I know is swedish where a managing director is abbreviated to
    > VD
    
    Half a million cars in Switzerland have got VD on their number plates... all
    those belonging to people in the Canton of Vaud!
    
    -- 
    Sophie Rickebusch
    CH - Wettswil a. A.
  • ...

    Chris1Ronald March 8, 2006, 4:16 p.m. (Message 44568, in reply to message 44535)

    _Sophie wrote_ (mailto:xxxxxx.xxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxx.xx) :
    
    "Half a  million cars in Switzerland have got VD on their number  plates..."
    I used to think that STD meant subscriber trunk dialling but - perhaps  
    because we've all got that kind of STD these days - it now means  something else.  
     
    Not to be confused with SCD, of course (says he, in a rather pathetic  
    attempt to bring things back on topic.)
     
    Chris, New York.
  • ...

    John Chambers March 8, 2006, 10:43 p.m. (Message 44590, in reply to message 44535)

    | I eventually worked out that TLA meant "Three Letter Acronym"
    |
    | TTFN (that's an FLA no doubt!)
    |
    | Graham Hamilton
    
    One of the better examples of the humor in  the  computer  industry's
    "jargon file" is that the correct acronym in this case is ETLA, which
    stands for Extended Three-Letter Acronym.  It's a great parody of how
    such  things  are often done.  And note that, just as TLA is itself a
    TLA, ETLA is also an ETLA.
    
    
    --
       _,
       O   John Chambers
     <:#/> <xx@xxxxxxxx.xxx.xxx>
       +   <xxxxxx@xxxxx.xxx>
      /#\  in Waltham, Massachusetts, USA, Earth
      | |
  • ...

    Pia Walker March 9, 2006, 10:05 a.m. (Message 44597, in reply to message 44590)

    I too find acronyms annoying, and have and will stress in committees that I
    find acronyms in minutes, reports and general speech during meetings
    unacceptable as it delays and distracts the thought process.
    
    Pia
  • ...

    Alexandre Rafalovitch March 9, 2006, 3:30 p.m. (Message 44609, in reply to message 44597)

    On 3/9/06, Pia <xxx@xxxxxxxx.xxx> wrote:
    > I too find acronyms annoying, and have and will stress in committees that I
    > find acronyms in minutes, reports and general speech during meetings
    > unacceptable as it delays and distracts the thought process.
    
    The research has shown that the acronyms do cause the breaks in the
    thought process if they are unknown or conflicting with other meanings
    (like the QC discussed). However, once you know what the acronym means
    for the context, it has its own semantic load and actually helps out
    by triggering concept parsing faster. And the same applies to longer
    phrases such as Mayday, which is recognised without having to know the
    French original.
    
    In the IT (sorry, information technology) world, the abstructions are
    so high and piled on each other, that spelling everything out may
    really get in a way of conversation. Whether it is the same for other
    fields I don't know, but I suspect it might.
    
    Regards,
       Alex.
  • ...

    Martin March 11, 2006, 9:31 p.m. (Message 44637, in reply to message 44535)

    
          
        

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