Thread Index

What do you think about this?

Previous Thread Next Thread Indented

  • ...

    Marilynn Knight Oct. 1, 2001, 5:41 p.m. (Message 27615)

    It hit me in the wee hours of this morning.  What is the principle
    difference between Contra Dance Groups and Scottish Country Dance Groups,
    both ostensibly social:  one puts people ahead of perfection, the other puts
    perfection ahead of people......???
     
    Marilynn Latta Knight
    Now, why don't I just keep quiet!!!!
  • ...

    Miriam L. Mueller Oct. 1, 2001, 6:17 p.m. (Message 27617, in reply to message 27615)

    Ironically, in our area, the Scottish Country Dance groups are more open
    socially and more social on the floor - we're always glad to welcome a
    prospective new partner, and dances always begin and end with bows and
    courtseys (sp?). At the last contra dances I attended, eye contact was
    often at a minimum, and the moment the dance ended my partner was gone to
    look for someone for the next dance. It may have to do with my grey hair,
    but at least at Scottish there's the illusion, in that final salute, that
    they wanted to dance with me.
    Miriam Mueller, San Francisco
    
    On Mon, 1 Oct 2001 11:41:50 -0400 Marilynn Knight
    <xxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxx.xxx> writes:
  • ...

    Anselm Lingnau Oct. 1, 2001, 6:09 p.m. (Message 27618, in reply to message 27615)

    Marilynn Knight <xxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxx.xxx> writes:
    
    > What is the principle
    > difference between Contra Dance Groups and Scottish Country Dance Groups,
    > both ostensibly social:  one puts people ahead of perfection, the other puts
    > perfection ahead of people......???
    
    Whoa there, controversy alert! This reminds me of one of the entries in
    my signature file:
    
      What is the difference between Jurassic Park and Microsoft? One is a
      high-tech theme park dominated by dinosaurs, and the other is a Steven
      Spielberg movie.                                       -- Mike Hammond
    
    In fact I happen to believe that both genres do put people first, mostly
    (and, speaking for SCD groups I have known, in many instances they do!).
    They may differ in the degree of perfection that is desired by
    individual dancers, but I shall go out on a limb and claim that there
    will be contra dancers who strive for perfection just as there will be
    Scottish country dancers who don't appear to mind scraping by with the
    barest minimum necessary. Both these species must rely on the indulgence
    of their fellow dancers :^)
    
    Anselm
    -- 
    Anselm Lingnau .......................................... xxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx
    Books don't stay banned. They won't burn. Ideas won't go to jail. In the long
    run of history, the censor and the inquisitor have always lost. The only sure
    weapon against bad ideas is better ideas.                -- A. Whitney Griswold
  • ...

    Marilynn Knight Oct. 1, 2001, 7:45 p.m. (Message 27619, in reply to message 27615)

    Actually, I have to agree with you, Anselm.  I do believe that my early
    morning pseudo-gestalt does imbed a cautionary when we think about
    attracting others, perhaps?
  • ...

    Jerry Corwin Oct. 1, 2001, 9:09 p.m. (Message 27620, in reply to message 27615)

    To me the difference, other than you get much dizzier
    Contra dancing, is like the difference between
    Checkers
    and Chess.  Where Both can be learned fairly quickly,
    one adds another level of complexity and you can spend
    a lifetime trying to get better.
    
    Neither is better than the other, it all depends on
    your temperament.
    
    Jerry
  • ...

    Marilynn Knight Oct. 1, 2001, 9:12 p.m. (Message 27621, in reply to message 27615)

    Great analogy, Jerry!  I will use that when asked by others how the two
    forms compare.. Thanks.
  • ...

    Pia Walker Oct. 1, 2001, 10:15 p.m. (Message 27622, in reply to message 27615)

    In the wee hours of this morning?  Have you tried sleeping pills - lots of
    exercise - whisky and all the other remedies to make you sleep better?
    
    Seriously worried
    
    Pia :>) :>o )
  • ...

    Marilynn Knight Oct. 1, 2001, 10:04 p.m. (Message 27623, in reply to message 27615)

    No need to worry, Pia!!!  You make me laugh.  I intentionally, and
    naturally, wake early to catch the best of both, the night and the day, when
    I have rested.  I write every morning when my thoughts are unimpeded by
    anything else.  Maybe it comes from childhood when, if I was up by 3:30, I
    could walk out with my grandfather to get the cows.... Now, how does this
    relate to SCD?  Because I think Breakfast dances would be a lovely custom
    with breakfast served in courses between dances.  Does anyone else agree?
  • ...

    ron.mackey Oct. 1, 2001, 11:13 p.m. (Message 27628, in reply to message 27623)

    Maybe it comes from childhood when, if I was up by 3:30, I
    > could walk out with my grandfather to get the cows.... Now, how does this
    > relate to SCD?  Because I think Breakfast dances would be a lovely custom
    > with breakfast served in courses between dances.  Does anyone else agree?
    > 
    
    	Hi, Marilynn
    		I'm with Pia on this.  By you rising habits I would be restricted 
    to 1 1/2 hours of sleep when I need at least 6 to feel even remotely 
    human !!      
    	Now I get a few remarks from my 'friends' !
    
    Cheers,  Ron   :)
    
     < 0   Ron Mackey,(Purveyor of Pat's Party Pieces)
      'O>  Mottingham, 
      /#\  London. UK.
       l>
    xxx.xxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx
  • ...

    Malcolm and Helen Brown Oct. 2, 2001, 2:52 a.m. (Message 27637, in reply to message 27623)

    Greetings,
    
     Marilynn said
    
    > ... Now, how does this relate to SCD?   Because I think Breakfast dances
    > would be a lovely custom with breakfast served in courses between dances.
    > Does anyone else agree?
    
    I think this is an interesting idea.   Many years ago, Malcolm had an 
    idea that he would like to hold a ball in a grand country house and 
    instead of finishing at midnight or just before as usual, finish with
    breakfast.   (This never materialised.)
    
    I also had to smile at Marilynn's idea of a Breakfast dance as one of
    our sons often tells us "I don't do mornings"!   Maybe only the morning
    people would be there.
    
    Helen 
     
    
    -- 
       _     _
      |_|_  |_| Malcolm & Helen Brown - York (UK) - x.xxxxx@xxxxxxxx.xx.xx (Tir-Nan-Og)
     _  |_|_  
    |_|  _|_|   Connecting via NETCOM Internet Ltd
        |_|
  • ...

    ron.mackey Oct. 1, 2001, 11:06 p.m. (Message 27625, in reply to message 27615)

    > It hit me in the wee hours of this morning.  What is the principle
    > difference between Contra Dance Groups and Scottish Country Dance Groups,
    > both ostensibly social:  one puts people ahead of perfection, the other puts
    > perfection ahead of people......???
    >  
    > Marilynn Latta Knight
    > Now, why don't I just keep quiet!!!!
    
    	It's a compulsion, Marilynn !! :)
    		I suggest it completely depends on the people who make up the 
    clubs, no?
    	Hands up those who go for people _and_ perfection. Well as near as 
    one can get !! :~)
    
    Cheers,  Ron   :)
    
     < 0   Ron Mackey,(Purveyor of Pat's Party Pieces)
      'O>  Mottingham, 
      /#\  London. UK.
       l>
    xxx.xxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx
  • ...

    Lee Fuell Oct. 1, 2001, 11:31 p.m. (Message 27633, in reply to message 27615)

    Related question,
    
    Does contra dancing have as rigorous a teacher certification 
    process as SCD, with the significant emphasis our process places 
    on at least seeking perfection in technique?  Personally, I enjoy the 
    challenge of seeking (but failing to obtain...) perfection, but as my 
    branch well knows, I fear over-emphasis on technique at the 
    expense of just having fun is a major deterrent to mass 
    participation (and perhaps a contributor to declining numbers in 
    SCD groups).  Every group has its own personality, of course, but I 
    think our teacher certification process inherently selects for an 
    emphasis on technique.
    
    It's a bit of a conundrum, actually - it's the technique that makes 
    SCD Scottish; but it's the technique that makes it hard.  Without 
    the technique, it's not SCD, but with too much emphasis on 
    technique, no one does SCD...
    
    Thoughts?  Counter-points?
    
    Lee
    
    Send reply to:  	xxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx
    From:           	Marilynn Knight <xxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxx.xxx>
    To:             	"'xxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx'" <xxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx>
    Subject:        	What do you think about this?
    Date sent:      	Mon, 1 Oct 2001 11:41:50 -0400
  • ...

    Fyreladdie Oct. 2, 2001, 2:42 a.m. (Message 27639, in reply to message 27615)

    In a message dated 10/1/01 8:43:22 AM, xxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxx.xxx writes:
    
    << It hit me in the wee hours of this morning.  What is the principle
    
    difference between Contra Dance Groups and Scottish Country Dance Groups,
    
    both ostensibly social:  one puts people ahead of perfection, the other puts
    
    perfection ahead of people......???
    
      >>
    
        I think the difference is, in what people are willing to do for 
    recreation. The person who played football is considered a sportman. But the 
    person who watches it on the TV faithfully is also considered a sportman. I 
    don't believe anyone puts the dance before the people. It's just a matter of 
    willingness to extend ones personal abilities in their chosen form of 
    entertainement. 
        Contra is a fine form of entertainment but SCD is a more challenging form 
    to me.
    
    Bob Mc Murtry
    Felton, CA
  • ...

    Fyreladdie Oct. 2, 2001, 2:47 a.m. (Message 27640, in reply to message 27615)

    In a message dated 10/1/01 1:06:30 PM, xxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxx.xxx writes:
    
    << Now, how does this
    
    relate to SCD?  Because I think Breakfast dances would be a lovely custom
    
    with breakfast served in courses between dances.  Does anyone else agree? >>
    
    Marilyn,
        Eating is my other hobby. Love the breakfast dance idea. I may have to 
    devise a few for such occasions. 
    
    Bob Mc Murtry
    Felton, CA
  • ...

    Cecilia Stolzer Grote Oct. 2, 2001, 8:53 a.m. (Message 27647, in reply to message 27615)

    Well... I don't know about eating between dances (urp,  excuse me!)... but
    several of us from the San Francisco used to (maybe still do) get together
    for Sunday brunch periodically, as a way of devising dances, trying out
    dances we had devised, socializing and eating.  We even published a book of
    dances called, surprisingly "Sunday Brunch".
    
    Cecilia Stolzer-Grote
    RSCDS San Francisco Branch
    
    
    
    Message text written by INTERNET:xxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx
    >Greetings,
    
     Marilynn said
    
    > ... Now, how does this relate to SCD?   Because I think Breakfast dances
    > would be a lovely custom with breakfast served in courses between dances.
    > Does anyone else agree?
    
    I think this is an interesting idea.   Many years ago, Malcolm had an 
    idea that he would like to hold a ball in a grand country house and 
    instead of finishing at midnight or just before as usual, finish with
    breakfast.   (This never materialised.)
    
    I also had to smile at Marilynn's idea of a Breakfast dance as one of
    our sons often tells us "I don't do mornings"!   Maybe only the morning
    people would be there.
    
    Helen 
     <
  • ...

    Cecilia Stolzer Grote Oct. 2, 2001, 8:54 a.m. (Message 27648, in reply to message 27615)

    Message text written by INTERNET:xxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx
    >
    In a message dated 10/1/01 8:43:22 AM, xxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxx.xxx writes:
    
    << It hit me in the wee hours of this morning.  What is the principle
    
    difference between Contra Dance Groups and Scottish Country Dance Groups,
    
    both ostensibly social:  one puts people ahead of perfection, the other
    puts
    
    perfection ahead of people......???  >>
    <
    
    Not necessarily, I've been to many, many Contra Dances where half my
    partners never looked me in the eye, they were staring off into space... 
    and I'm really not THAT ugly.
    
    As with anything, it's usually dangerous to make broad generalizations.
    
    Cecilia Stolzer-Grote
    RSCDS San Francisco Branch
  • ...

    Anselm Lingnau Oct. 2, 2001, 10:32 a.m. (Message 27652, in reply to message 27615)

    Lee Fuell <xxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx> writes:
    
    > It's a bit of a conundrum, actually - it's the technique that makes 
    > SCD Scottish; but it's the technique that makes it hard.  Without 
    > the technique, it's not SCD, but with too much emphasis on 
    > technique, no one does SCD...
    
    I think we need to accept the fact that SCD, like most other sports/
    performance arts/social pastimes requires a minimal commitment from
    participants to learn. This is not to say that everybody should make it
    their most important goal in life to be on the Younger Hall demo team,
    but as a teacher I like to think that a Scottish country dancer should
    at least be prepared to make an honest effort to, say, mentally
    associate `rights and lefts' with a certain floor pattern and use of
    hands, so they do not have to rely on their fellow dancers to shunt them
    around the set merely because they themselves can't be bothered to think
    along.
    
    These are the places where `technique' counts most, not steps and foot
    pointing (which, make no mistake, are nice when they work right, and
    which many dancers still find important enough to try and master).
    However the basic formations, phrasing and similar properties of being a
    dancer _in_a_set_of_other_dancers_ are the technical prerequisites for
    making SCD social and fun for all -- not just for oneself. I don't feel
    it is asking too much of dancers to at least try and get a handle on
    these. Everything else that comes on top of that is, at the end of the
    day, a luxury that is up to personal ambition, of which some dancers
    seem to have much more than their fair share and others none at all;
    it's usually the former who you're going to find at workshops and other
    venues of self-improvement but the latter can be just as sociable, fun
    to be with, and important for their groups/clubs/...
    
    In other words, we're not all Michael Schumacher but that doesn't make
    us second-class drivers; we can still go places in our cars and get
    there without bumping into objects on the way (mostly!).
    
    Anselm
    -- 
    Anselm Lingnau .......................................... xxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx
    While I dance I cannot judge, I cannot hate, I cannot separate myself from
    life. I can only be joyful and whole. That is why I dance.          -- Hans Bos
  • ...

    Lee Fuell Oct. 2, 2001, 12:43 p.m. (Message 27654, in reply to message 27652)

    Anselm,
    
    Re:
    
    Date sent:      	Tue, 02 Oct 2001 10:32:05 +0200
    From:           	Anselm Lingnau <xxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx>
    
    > Everything else that comes on top of that is, at the end of
    > the day, a luxury that is up to personal ambition, of which some
    > dancers seem to have much more than their fair share and others none
    > at all; it's usually the former who you're going to find at workshops
    > and other venues of self-improvement but the latter can be just as
    > sociable, fun to be with, and important for their groups/clubs/...
    
    Excellent points all, especially the above.  My concern lies with the 
    potential for "disconnects in perception" between teachers and 
    social dancers, leading to diminishing participation due to classes 
    with too much footwork & other technique practice, not enough 
    dancing (it's happened here).  I think the very nature and rigor of our 
    teacher certification process causes our teachers to come from the 
    "more than their fair share of personal ambition" end of the the 
    spectrum (not a criticism, just an observation - it has to take more 
    than middlin' ambition to go through the process).  (Note to 
    readers:  please don't interpret "ambition" used in this context as a 
    perjorative; it's not.)  The potential result is that teachers, given this 
    predisposition for personal improvement, may have a different 
    perception of what constitutes a fun, balanced class than do the 
    socially-oriented class members.  
    
    So the challenge remains - how do teachers balance the need to 
    maintain the fundamental character of SCD (i.e., proper technique) 
    with the need to develop (or keep) lots of dancers on the floor 
    dancing SCD?  Striking the right balance is, I expect, far from 
    easy.  
    
    Happy dancing,
    
    Lee
  • ...

    Martin.Sheffield Oct. 2, 2001, 10:01 p.m. (Message 27675, in reply to message 27654)

    At 06:43 02/10/01 -0400, you wrote:
    >So the challenge remains - how do teachers balance the need to 
    >maintain the fundamental character of SCD (i.e., proper technique) 
    >with the need to develop (or keep) lots of dancers on the floor? 
    > Striking the right balance is, I expect, far from 
    >easy.  
    
    Yes, indeed.
    (I might even say impossible, since every class and every dancer is different)
    My way of looking at the problem is to *try* and give people what they seem
    to be looking for, even if it does jot follow what is prescribed in teacher
    training. You can usually feel when the class/club members want more of
    this and less of that, but you'll be lucky if they are unanimous in
    wanting, for example, more pre-dance exercises, or more new dances, or less
    "let's just dance", or less "let's just make tea and have a chat."
    
    I have also done a lot of foreign language teaching. It is very similar to
    dance teaching, in that you have to keep people happy as well as getting
    something into their heads: if the students don't feel relaxed, they won't
    be ready to join in participatory exercises, question & answer drills, etc.
    Similarly, if the dancers don't feel they are getting the
    relaxation/footwork practise, or whatever they happen to wish for, they may
    well drop out. However much the teacehr may dispporiove of his students'
    ungrammatical utterances, he has to encourage them and keep a happy smile
    on everyone's faces. In the same way, whatever we think of our fellow
    dancers' footwork, we have to show them how glad we are to have them in our
    classes.
    
    Striking a balance means giving a littel bit of everything, not forcing
    anyone to do more than they want to (and fingers crossed taht the "little
    bit" will be suffciient to get at least some of the class to imporve their
    style little by little.
    If you have read all this before, then I have been on the Strathspey list
    for too long ! 
    Perhaps I'd better take up contra dancing and see how it compares.
    
    Martin, 
    in Grenoble, where summer has returned, skies are incredibly blue, the
    dancing season has begun ,and all is well.
  • ...

    Lee Fuell Oct. 3, 2001, 12:22 a.m. (Message 27678, in reply to message 27675)

    Anselm & List, 
    
    Jeez, I'm really in need of that "Oops-Mailaholics Anonymous" 12-
    step program.  At least the last time I did this, the note was more 
    or less on topic.  This one isn't even close, and to make matters 
    worse, it regards the specifically-banned WTC issue.  I throw 
    myself on the mercy of the court!
    
    Lee
    
    Donald Lee
    Fuell, Jr." 
    <<xxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx>
    
    To:             
    xxxxxxxxxxxx@xxx.xxx
    
    Date sent:      	Tue, 2 Oct 2001
    17:42:23 -0400
    
    
    Ruth,
    
    
    One thing Patty pointed out that I missed - the tourist in the picture 
    is wearing a winter coat and stocking cap.  September 11 was a 
    pretty warm day; even at the top of the World Trade Center, I doubt 
    it was cold enough for that attire.  Although the photo has a "09 11 
    01" date stamp, that's probably easier to fake than putting in the 
    airplane.  Also, I'm skeptical that a camera could survive a fall of 
    over 1,000 ft and the fire and not bust open and overexpose the 
    film.  Even with a digital camera, survival of the disk would be 
    questionable.
    
    
    I'm glad Meagan is going.  If I hear of anything that causes me 
    concern, I'll let you know.
    
    
    Take care,
    
    
    Lee
  • ...

    Anselm Lingnau Oct. 2, 2001, 1:20 p.m. (Message 27656, in reply to message 27615)

    Lee Fuell <xxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx> writes:
    
    > So the challenge remains - how do teachers balance the need to 
    > maintain the fundamental character of SCD (i.e., proper technique) 
    > with the need to develop (or keep) lots of dancers on the floor 
    > dancing SCD?  Striking the right balance is, I expect, far from 
    > easy.
    
    It also depends on the type of class. I have met teachers who are really
    excellent given a group of people who are keen to learn, in a workshop
    setting where there is essentially nothing to do but dance, eat, sleep
    and socialize -- but who I would not be convinced I would ask to have as
    my weekly teacher in a `general' class.
    
    It is always more difficult for a teacher to inspire enthusiasm and the
    will to excel in people who have a full day's worth of their daily job
    behind them, especially when these people are the kind of mixture of the
    ambitious and not-quite-so-ambitious that one tends to have in a
    `general' class. I agree that this is something which is touched upon
    very lightly in RSCDS certification classes -- it would be exaggerating
    unduly to claim that the subject was completely ignored, which at least
    in my class wasn't the case -- but it must also be appreciated that the
    ability to do this is not something which is (a) straightforward to
    teach (or learn) in a 2-week course of instruction, or (b) easy to
    examine fairly at the end of said course.
    
    It must also be reiterated, at the peril of preaching to the choir in
    this forum, that having passed the RSCDS certificate does not of itself
    make you a great teacher. If anything it is a vote of encouragement that
    the certificate holder may one day become one; it's part of the
    foundations rather than the cap-stone. I'd say that there is much more
    to a great teacher -- having been fortunate enough to meet a few
    individuals that, to me, deserve the title -- than can be learned in a
    certificate class. Which is not to say that certificate classes are
    useless, only that there are some aspects to SCD teaching that can't
    really be taught during 80 hours of formal instruction.
    
    Anselm
    -- 
    Anselm Lingnau .......................................... xxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx
    When I am working on a problem, I never think about beauty. I think only how to
    solve the problem. But when I have finished, if the solution is not beautiful,
    I know it is wrong.                                    -- R. Buckminster Fuller
  • ...

    Fyreladdie Oct. 2, 2001, 4:45 p.m. (Message 27662, in reply to message 27615)

    In a message dated 10/2/01 6:51:13 AM, xxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx writes:
    
    << 
    It must also be reiterated, at the peril of preaching to the choir in
    this forum, that having passed the RSCDS certificate does not of itself
    make you a great teacher. If anything it is a vote of encouragement that
    the certificate holder may one day become one; it's part of the
    foundations rather than the cap-stone. I'd say that there is much more
    to a great teacher -- having been fortunate enough to meet a few
    individuals that, to me, deserve the title -- than can be learned in a
    certificate class. Which is not to say that certificate classes are
    useless, only that there are some aspects to SCD teaching that can't
    really be taught during 80 hours of formal instruction. >>
    
    Anselm,
        Well said! The enthusiasm of becoming a teacher does not always spill out 
    into being a good teacher. You do not become an expert when you hang that 
    certificate on the wall. You become a student again. Teaching is learning and 
    humility. I continue to learn after many years of teaching and get a good 
    dose of humility from time to time. The love of teaching does not diminish in 
    time but gets more challenging. 
    
    Bob Mc Murtry
    Felton, Calif
  • ...

    Marilynn Knight Oct. 2, 2001, 7:03 p.m. (Message 27670, in reply to message 27615)

    Couldn't agree more...
  • ...

    harvey Oct. 3, 2001, 5:36 p.m. (Message 27697, in reply to message 27615)

    My perspective is that a major difference between SCD and Contra
    is the commitment to learning. Almost all people who want to do SCD
    well have to go to classes; as a result, most SCDing ends up being in
    a classroom setting. This produces many effects:
    
    1) dancers will travel far and wide looking for a great teacher 
    
    2) teachers have great need to combine sociability, fun, and education
    
    3) dancers who love lessons and learning will feel at home in SCD
    
    4) dancers who don't yearn for perpetual lessons and self-improvement
    sometimes get fed up.
    
    I think the focus on classes is what builds strong SCD communities. I
    LOVE an evening of dancing; but I think that my strongest social
    connections have been built in class settings over time. (why?)
    
    The extreme example of a classroom relationship is that between
    student and teacher, and (while I am not a Contra dancer very often)
    it is hard for me to imagine that kind of relationship building
    between a caller and dancer.
    
    Terry
  • ...

    Fyreladdie Oct. 3, 2001, 5:53 p.m. (Message 27698, in reply to message 27615)

    In a message dated 10/3/01 8:38:39 AM, xxxxxx@xxxx.xxxxx.xxxx.xxx writes:
    
    << 
    I think the focus on classes is what builds strong SCD communities. I
    LOVE an evening of dancing; but I think that my strongest social
    connections have been built in class settings over time. (why?)
     >>
    
    Terry,
        I think you may have hit upon an important factor. Social connection is 
    one of the main reasons for a strong SCD group. The reason is, as SCD we need 
    to dance as a team and not as an individual. If the team fails we all fail. 
    My experience with Contra is that individuals like to "Grand stand" a bit 
    more with their twirls and extra turns with little regard to the phrasing and 
    beauty of the dance. On more than one occasion I have had to catch up in a 
    dance because others thought it more important to do, just one more twirl. 
        In SCD we have learned to cooperate and that brings us closer together. 
    The few times I did Contra, I really felt like an outsider and surely not 
    part of the group. It may have been just my experience with Contra but SCD 
    has me in it's grips and I am lost to it until such time the legs and feet no 
    longer move. Happy dancing.
    
    Bob Mc Murtry
    Felton, Calif

Previous Thread Next Thread