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google failed me!!! (Mellenish/Mellinish)

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    Volleyballjerry May 25, 2006, 4:02 p.m. (Message 45371)

    I don't think that Google failed because there is apparently no such place.  
    Aside from the fact that Google would almost assuredly bring it up if there 
    were, my AA Road Atlas of Great Britain, which seems to have even the tiniest 
    village of merely two houses, lists no such place, not by either of the two 
    spellings of the dance (Mellenish/Mellinish).
    
    The only thing that I might logically conclude is that perhaps the braes of 
    Mellenish are hillsides belonging to, on the property of, said plasterer.  
    Perhaps someone else has a better thought or even definite information about this. 
     ("Brae," sometimes merely a hill, is also often more specifically a coastal 
    slope.)
    
    Robb Quint
    Thousand Oaks, CA, USA
  • ...

    suepetyt May 25, 2006, 4:45 p.m. (Message 45373, in reply to message 45371)

    If you look at http://www.thesession.org/tunes/display/2340 is indicates
    that it is also known as Kentigern's Jig.
    
    Kentigern was a Saint (also known as Mungo) and is buried under Glasgow
    Cathedral.
    
    There is also a Scottish Folk Group called Kentigern.
    
    None of this helps with the name Mellinish though!
    
    Happy Dancing
    Sue Petyt
    www.suepetyt.me.uk 
    Skype Sue Petyt
  • ...

    Steve Wyrick May 25, 2006, 5:53 p.m. (Message 45375, in reply to message 45373)

    And noting that the "Braes of Mellinish/Melinish" tune is a jig, while the 
    dance is a strathspey, it just raises further questions...  -Steve
  • ...

    Pia Walker May 25, 2006, 6:02 p.m. (Message 45376, in reply to message 45375)

    First church on that place built by St. Mungo (patron saint of Glasgow ) in
    ca. 612 of wood - added to until 1840 when two tall towers was demolished to
    show cathedral as it is today.
    
    Pia
    Full of useless knowledge.
  • ...

    Thomas G. Mungall, III May 25, 2006, 9:41 p.m. (Message 45377, in reply to message 45371)

    It could be one of those instances where the tune and or the
    dance is more famous than the place. I have found a number of instances
    (especially with Scotland) where a place name is not found on Google or any
    other search engine. I found an entry on this page:
    http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~maryc/bruce01.htm for a  Marion MELLINISH.
    So, one can induct that there may in fact be a place name Mellinish.
    
    However, correspondence with Undiscovered Scotland got this response:
    
    "We've got a searchable Ordnance Survey 1:50K digital map of the whole of 
    Scotland, and it doesn't include either name or any close variant we 
    tried."
    
    I hope that helps!
    
    Tom Mungall
    Baton Rouge, La, USA
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    alan mair May 25, 2006, 10:26 p.m. (Message 45378, in reply to message 45377)

    . I found an entry on this page:
    > http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~maryc/bruce01.htm for a  Marion MELLINISH.
    > So, one can induct that there may in fact be a place name Mellinish.
    >
    > However, correspondence with Undiscovered Scotland got this response:
    >
    > "We've got a searchable Ordnance Survey 1:50K digital map of the whole of
    > Scotland, and it doesn't include either name or any close variant we
    > tried."
    
    I think the answer may be in the Gaelic and I don't have much. It is even
    more difficult to spell but I suspect Mellinish is Meall an .........? Meall
    an t - Seallaidh near Lochearnhead may sound familiar. There is a Meall an
    t - Sithe up in the North of Scotland which might be what you are looking
    for. Ben Nevis has the alternative name of Meall an t - Suidhe but how to
    pronounce it? Have we got a better Gaelic speaker than me on the list? A
    hill climber might help but they have probably got better things to do at
    this time of the year!!
    
    Alan
    
    Cupar

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