Thread Index

Australian Ladies

Previous Thread Next Thread Unindented

  • ...

    Ian Thomson Oct. 9, 2001, 4:38 a.m. (Message 27804)

    Have a look at "MiniCrib". It contains instructions for most dances, which 
    can be down-loaded for crib sheets. Incidentally, there seem to be two 
    dances, both called "Australian Ladies".
    
    
    
    Ian Thomson,
    "Braeburn",
    27 Thomas Place,
    Upper Kedron,
    Queensland  4055, Australia.
    
    Ph. (07) 3851 1164
    
    E-mail:  x.xxxxxxx@xxx.xxx.xx
             or   xxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxx.xxx.xx
  • ...

    Murray Wilson Oct. 12, 2001, 9:45 a.m. (Message 27858, in reply to message 27804)

    G'Day Brian,
    I just remembered, a couple of years ago I had the programme for a social
    dance on the out going message on my answer-phone, dancers could phone in
    and get the dance programme, the final dance was Australian Ladies.
    The in-coming tape had a mans voice saying "I didn't think there was any"
    Wasn't that awful
    Murray Wilson
    Auckland
    NZ
  • ...

    eclyde Oct. 12, 2001, 4:47 p.m. (Message 27862, in reply to message 27858)

    Yes, the grammar is terrible!
    
    Sorry, couldn't resist.
    
    Eric
  • ...

    Ian Thomson Oct. 13, 2001, 3:20 a.m. (Message 27871, in reply to message 27858)

    The man's grammar is even worse!!
    
    At 08:45  12/10/01 +1300, you wrote:
    >G'Day Brian,
    >I just remembered, a couple of years ago I had the programme for a social
    >dance on the out going message on my answer-phone, dancers could phone in
    >and get the dance programme, the final dance was Australian Ladies.
    >The in-coming tape had a mans voice saying "I didn't think there was any"
    >Wasn't that awful
    >Murray Wilson
    >Auckland
    >NZ
    
    
    
    Ian Thomson,
    "Braeburn",
    27 Thomas Place,
    Upper Kedron,
    Queensland  4055, Australia.
    
    Ph. (07) 3851 1164
    
    E-mail:  x.xxxxxxx@xxx.xxx.xx
             or   xxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxx.xxx.xx
  • ...

    KeithNap Oct. 12, 2001, 2:03 p.m. (Message 27860, in reply to message 27804)

    > From: Ian Thomson <xxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxx.xxx.xx>
    > Subject: Australian Ladies 1
    > 
    > I have it on the very best authority that this dance was devised in May 
    > 1967 in New Zealand by Bob Campbell of Canada for Jean Conway, Elma See, 
    > Lorraine Dyall,
    > and Margaret Gray of the Newcastle (Aust.) Colleges Strathspey and Reel 
    > Club.
    > Elma See was one of the distinguished teachers at the 26th Australian 
    > Winter School held here in Brisbane recently. (This is the version where 
    > the corners set and cross while the dancing couple keep crossing between 
    > them to the right.)
    > 
    > 
    > 
    
    Hi,
           Of the four Australian ladies mentioned above, only on Elma See is 
    still actively involved with Scottish Country Dancing.   The dance was 
    written by Bob Campbell who was inspired by a photograph of a winning 
    competition team at the Highland Games on New years day in Sydney in the 
    early 60s.   He wrote the dance to a pipe tune,  Australian Ladies.   
    Unfortunately, the Australian men in the team seem to have been forgotten.  
    One of them, Heinz Duewell, was also at the Queensland winter school, still 
    dancing at 80.  Elma See's husband, Hugh was another, although no longer 
    dancing.
    
    Bob Campbell never came to either New Zealand or Australia, so the dance was 
    not written in New Zealand.
    
    I remember first learning this dance, with the second and third couples 
    dancing rights and lefts with setting in bars 17 to 32, whereas in the 
    Glasgow Assembly book when published the second and third couples cross with 
    the right hands each time.  In my archives I have a typewritten copy of the 
    dance, source unidentified, in which the second and third couples dance 
    rights and lefts.
    
    (Hays) Australian Ladies was written on 29th June 1966, but the dance was not 
    published until 1994, after Alec Hays death, thus it is not as well known. 
    Bob Campbells was written in May 1967, and was published in 1976.   The two 
    dances are completely different.   Hays instructions recommend the Music "Gay 
    Gordons" by Stan Hamilton and "The Flying Scotsman" in R.C.A. victor R.P.L. 
    3404.   The dance is named for the tune Australian Ladies used in the 
    recording.
    
    Keith Napier
    Sydney Australia
  • ...

    Ian McHaffie Oct. 12, 2001, 2:45 p.m. (Message 27861, in reply to message 27860)

    Thanks, Keith, for all the extra info. on the Ladies.
    
    Also, while I am typing, thanks retroactively for all the data work 
    you did so for so long which helped bring us to the place where we 
    are today!
    
    Ian McHaffie
    xxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxx.xx
  • ...

    mlbrown Oct. 12, 2001, 6:52 p.m. (Message 27863, in reply to message 27860)

    Keith wrote:
    
    > I remember first learning this dance, with the second and third couples
    > dancing rights and lefts with setting in bars 17 to 32, whereas in the
    > Glasgow Assembly book when published the second and third couples cross
    with
    > the right hands each time.  In my archives I have a typewritten copy of
    the
    > dance, source unidentified, in which the second and third couples dance
    > rights and lefts.
    
    
    Thank goodness there is some real evidence that the dance has been changed!
    A few years ago somebody relied on my instructions, which involved "Rights
    and Lefts", only to be confused when everyone insisted on giving right hand.
    Of course when I checked with the published instructions I thought I had
    just made another mistake.
    Since the correspondence started I had a look in my first note book, which
    at one time was one of the few sources I had of dance instructions - (how
    times have changed!),  - back at the time when I learnt the dance in York,
    during the 60s, I wrote down that it was Rights and Lefts with setting.
    It just goes to show the problems that are caused by revising dances!
    
    Just out of interest, has anyone who is thinking of teaching / dancing
    Euan's Jig (Book 28) noticed the amendment made in the Manual? (Not that it
    makes the dance much better!)
    
    Malcolm
  • ...

    Marjorie McLaughlin Oct. 13, 2001, 12:09 a.m. (Message 27868, in reply to message 27863)

    
          
        
  • ...

    ron.mackey Oct. 13, 2001, 1:40 a.m. (Message 27869, in reply to message 27860)

    > Unfortunately, the Australian men in the team seem to have been forgotten.  
    > One of them, Heinz Duewell, was also at the Queensland winter school, still 
    > dancing at 80.  Elma See's husband, Hugh was another, although no longer 
    > dancing.
     
    > Keith Napier
    > Sydney Australia
    
    	Hi, Keith,
    		I took my certificate in '62 at the same London class as Heinz.  
    Our tutor, Frances Stamp, has departed recently but it's nice to know 
    some are still active.  He used to come down from Oxford (where I 
    think he was post-grad) with his lederhosen in his bag and a tome of 
    some kind to while away the journey.  Happy days....
    Cheers,  Ron   :)
    
     < 0   Ron Mackey,(Purveyor of Pat's Party Pieces)
      'O>  Mottingham, 
      /#\  London. UK.
       l>
    xxx.xxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx
  • ...

    Rosemary Coupe Oct. 13, 2001, 3:31 a.m. (Message 27870, in reply to message 27860)

    > (Hays) Australian Ladies was written on 29th June 1966, but the dance was
    not
    > published until 1994, after Alec Hays death, thus it is not as well known.
    > Bob Campbells was written in May 1967, and was published in 1976.   The
    two
    > dances are completely different.   Hays instructions recommend the Music
    "Gay
    > Gordons" by Stan Hamilton and "The Flying Scotsman" in R.C.A. victor
    R.P.L.
    > 3404.   The dance is named for the tune Australian Ladies used in the
    > recording.
    >
    > Keith Napier
    > Sydney Australia
    
    Interesting that Alec Hay's dance, the less familiar of the two, was
    actually written first (by a matter of months) and was probably not known to
    Bob Campbell. I wonder who the original "Australian Ladies" in William
    Fergusson's pipe march were. Does anyone have information on Fergusson? His
    work was still in copyright when "Glasgow Assembly" was published, as Bob
    Campbell acknowledges the permission of Fergusson's estate to reprint the
    tune.
    
    Rosemary Coupe
    Vancouver

Previous Thread Next Thread