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strathspey@strathspey.org:45509

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  • Pia Walker

    Pia Walker June 11, 2006, 10:43 p.m. (Message 45509)

    RE: Regarding Dance Technique and Etiquette

    I think Jim it all comes down to experience - all ways of dancing are safe
    for the initiated.
    
    I agree that the thumb hold is safe at slower pace.
    
    I would advocate that all ways of turning are taught, rather than
    experienced, and I would argue that most ways are turning are ignored by
    dance instructors.
    
    How often do you encounter that 'turning ' is a self taught 'formation'
    instead of a movement which has to be deciphered?  I would say that
    'turning' in many dance styles are a most important point which can 'make' a
    dance, rather than a way of getting to a point.
    
    Pia
    -----Original Message-----
    From: strathspey-bounces-pia=xxxxxxxx.xxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx
    [mailto:strathspey-bounces-pia=xxxxxxxx.xxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx]On Behalf Of
    Jim Healy
    Sent: 10 June 2006 22:15
    To: xxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx
    Subject: RE: Regarding Dance Technique and Etiquette
    
    
    Greetings!
    
    Tom Mungall asks:
    >Regarding the thumb hold for turning, I am wondering if anyone has
    >witnessed or knows of someone who utilized this hold and got their
    >thumbs injured?
    Yes, and that's the safety problem with it. If the hold is taken properly
    there is little risk of the hand slipping and it is perfectly adequate to
    hold a partner who has lost his/her footing. The problem comes in taking the
    hold, when in order to take it properly when dancing at a reasonable jig or
    reel speed, you either have to slap the hands together (inelegant, at best)
    or you risk catching your thumb on a finger or the other thumb with a fair
    risk of a 'stave' (whatever that is in other versions of English) or, in the
    case I refrerred to at the beginning, a broken thumb.
    
    When I was dancing in Scotland outside the RSCDS in my youth, however, it
    was probably the third most common hold after linked arms, followed by the
    'cleek' as mentioned by Robin Lambie. The 'handshake' hold was only used by
    what seemed then to be the overly genteel.
    
    Jim Healy
    Perth and Monaco
    
    
    
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