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strathspey@strathspey.org:45488

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  • Thomas G. Mungall, III

    Thomas G. Mungall, III June 9, 2006, 5:59 p.m. (Message 45488)

    Re: Regarding Dance Technique and Etiquette

    Sophie, this is an excellent explanation. I have been doing some more
    research since I posted and noted that it is in particularly American Contra
    and Australian Bush dance tradition that will utilize the thumb turn while
    both English and Scottish Country traditions utilize the hand shake hold. I
    think since our vintage class attempts dances from other traditions such as
    Scottish, English and French, they should utilize the correct traditions
    that originate from those dance styles. I think your point is well taken
    regarding the use of a thumb hold in a march type of dance, such as the
    "Lancer's Quadrille", as being inconsequential but in reels and jigs it is a
    matter of safety.
    
    Tom
    ----- Original Message ----- 
    From: "Sophie Rickebusch" <xxxxxx.xxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxx.xx>
    
    
    I would tend to agree with you and not let pass something which is
    potentially
    dangerous. Most of the dancers in my class came to SCD through american
    barn-dancing or international folk dancing and they do have a tendency to
    use the
    thumb hold. Most of them quickly get the point when I explain why I do not
    want
    to see that in the SCD class. It may not be of much consequence in sedate,
    march-type dances, but in reels or jigs, where there is a risk that someone
    might
    slip while doing a fast turn, it's a different matter. If you take
    shake-hand
    hold and the other person stops supporting their own hand, you find yourself
    holding it up by the hand itself, which is fairly solid. Do the same with a
    thumb
    hold and you're left holding their thumb... just imagine what that would
    give if
    they slipped at full speed and you tried to hold them back! The other option
    being of course to drop hands if they slip, on the assumption that the fall
    will
    be less damaging than ripping out their thumb, but that wouldn't be very
    gentlemanly and my guess is they wouldn't thank you for it!
    
    Maybe a diplomatic way to approach this could be that you wouldn't like to
    risk
    causing THEM an injury - then demonstrate the point as explained above.
          

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