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strathspey@strathspey.org:45255

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  • Christina France

    Christina France May 12, 2006, 10:28 a.m. (Message 45255)

    RE: Attracting Young Folks/Music Tempo

    Well said,
    Christina
    > ----------
    > From:
    > strathspey-bounces-christina.france=xxxxxxxxxx.xxxx.xxx.xx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx
    > on behalf of Andrew Smith
    > Reply To: 	SCD news and discussion
    > Sent: 	Friday, May 12, 2006 8:53 AM
    > To: 	SCD news and discussion; Strathspey articles
    > Subject: 	Re: Attracting Young Folks/Music Tempo
    > 
    > If we were "brutally honest" we would lose more than one enthusiastic
    > member, and would be much the poorer for it. I have met some 'superior'
    > dancers in my time that were only technically perfect, and it would have
    > been a more enjoyable occasion for everyone if they were not in the set
    > clearly showing their impatience with the less able, even on occasion
    > actually ignoring them.
    > In my book a 'superior' dancer is one who having mastered the technique
    > will not make the less able feel unwanted, but will make them feel
    > positively welcome, and will make the less able feel that the 'superior'
    > dancer has enjoyed dancing with them as much as if they were dancing with
    > another 'superior' dancer.
    > There may be "nothing worse than one head bobbing out of sync" from a
    > critical spectator point of view, but remember that dancing is for the
    > dancers, it is not a spectator sport.
    > Even in the most sophisticated demonstration I would suggest that the most
    > important aspect is that the audience feels first and foremost that the
    > dancers are enjoying themselves and enjoying the music and the dance.
    > There
    > is then a very good chance that they will be distracted from bobbing heads
    > and untidy feet by 'the spirit of the dance.'
    > Technique does make a difference, obviously, but it is not the only
    > measure.
    > Enjoyment, sociability and respect for others are of the greatest
    > importance, IMHO.
    > Andrew,
    > Bristol, UK
    > ----- Original Message ----- 
    > From: "Don & Margaret Sarna" <xxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx>
    > To: "Strathspey articles" <xxxxxxxxxx@xx.xxxxxxxxxx.xxx-xxxxxxxxx.xx>;
    > "Strathspey items" <xxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx>
    > Sent: Wednesday, May 10, 2006 8:09 PM
    > Subject: Attracting Young Folks/Music Tempo
    > 
    > 
    > > To me, one sign of a 'superior' dancer is someone who can adapt to the
    > > tempo.  As someone who's watched more dancing (and demo's) than I care
    > to
    > > remember, there's nothing worse than one head bobbing out of sync with
    > the
    > > others.  This happens even in 8 hands around and back: 7 heads in sync,
    > one
    > > not.  It is a glaring, obvious error that the audience sees over all
    > other
    > > 'mistakes.'
    > >
    > > To be brutally honest, if a person can't pick up the beat from Scottish
    > > Country Dance music--and slow down or speed up to match--they should
    > sell
    > > their ghillies.  (;)
    > >
    > > Margaret Sarna
    > > Michigan
    > >
    > >
    > 
    > 
    > 
          

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