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strathspey@strathspey.org:27465

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  • RuddBaron

    RuddBaron Sept. 19, 2001, 7:35 p.m. (Message 27465)

    Re: Afghan opinion

    The glass is only half-empty when one is removing liquid from it. If
    it reaches its equilibrium state from above, i.e., more full, it is
    half empty. If it reaches it from below, it is half-full...all
    assuming that change is only in one direction. However, when one knows
    not whether the liquid is being added or removed, and the liquid is at
    the half-mark, it can be neither half empty nor half full. Introducing
    quantum theory into the problem introduces another set of
    difficulties, as measurements tend to destroy all previous
    information. As for the hyphens...one either carries an American
    passport or not. There is no Irish-American passport or Hindu-
    American. One flies the American flag or not. One does not fly a
    Scottish-American flag (some mix of the stars and stripes and St.
    Andrews cross?) or a Franco-American flag. An occasional use of a
    hyphen is all well and good, but this widespread use of it has led to
    such nonsense as "protected classes," and has furthered the divide
    between people.
    
    s/RBJ
    
    In a message dated Wed, 19 Sep 2001  1:23:56 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
    "Miriam L. Mueller" <xxxxxxxxxxx@xxxx.xxx> writes:
    
    > Oh Rudd - 
    > What a half-empty glass view it is when you say:
    >     "However, when it comes to stating nationality, African-American,
    > Scottish-American, Irish-   American, Hindu-Pakistani-Germanic-American,
    > etc., all have detractors from the "American"   part."
    > Quite the reverse - it is one of the prides and blessings of living here
    > that the hyphen ADDS to the definition and richness of "American". 
    > Miriam Mueller
          

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