strathspey Archive: achilles tendon

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achilles tendon

Message 7317 · kerstin kuhn · 10 Apr 1997 17:54:25 · Top

I´ve had problems with the achilles tendon, and so have several other dancers I know. Getting up in the morning
and limping around until they get into working condition and so on.

Recently, two people told me that what really helped them against it was - drinking much more! They tried
drinking the recommended two litres a day, and their achilles tendon was fine.

I´m no doctor, but maybe it´s something worth thinking about.

Kerstin
Proitzer Mühle
diemuehle@t-online.de

achilles tendon

Message 7325 · Eric Clyde · 10 Apr 1997 21:30:33 · Top

kerstin kuhn wrote:
>
> I´ve had problems with the achilles tendon, and so have several other dancers I know. Getting up in the morning
> and limping around until they get into working condition and so on.
>
> Recently, two people told me that what really helped them against it was - drinking much more! They tried
> drinking the recommended two litres a day, and their achilles tendon was fine.
>
>

Kerstin:
What was the magic brew -- wine, Scotch, or water? :-)
Eric

achilles tendon

Message 7333 · Kate M. Schell · 11 Apr 1997 05:46:02 · Top

If the achilles hurts worst first thing in the morning, you may be
on-the-way to a calcification of the tendon, AKA "bone spurs" - a
painful condition that can be diagnosed with X-rays, and _may_ be helped
with ultrasound treatments.
--
======================================================================
Kate Schell cschell@radix.net
Jacquard Systems Research phone & fax: 301-762-8999
800 Nelson Street http://www.radix.net/~cschell/jsr.html
Rockville, MD 20850-2051
The difference between genius and stupidity is
that genius has its limits.
======================================================================

achilles tendon

Message 7344 · Donald F. Robertson · 11 Apr 1997 20:36:58 · Top

Here's some information that may help.

I am an extremely active forty year old, and I have chronic tendon
problems from hiking and dancing. These extend through the entire
system of achilles tendon, and both across the bottom of the foot and up
the back of the leg. My doctor told me I was likely to this problem for
the rest of my life, so my options were extremely risky surgery, to quit
backpacking and dancing, or to learn how to manage it. Managing
tendonitus (sp?) consists of keeping the entire system stretched as much
as possible throughout the day, and keeping it from ever tightening up.

First of all, I've been told never to "limp around in the morning." You
have to avoid getting into a spiral where your tendons get tight, and
you keep using them so they get even tighter, and so on. If your tendon
is so tight that you can't use it in the morning, you should stay
completely off your feet (using crutches) until your tendons have
recovered. My doctor also emphasized that the tondons are an entire
system, and you have to keep them ALL stretched together. To achieve
that, she had me do the following:

The most dramatic improvement for me came from orthotics in my shoes,
which keep the arch high and the tendons there stretched. I also do
stretches before I get out of bed to relax the system before I put any
stress on it in the morning. My doctor said that you do most of the
damage when you first get up and put your full weight on the tendons,
because your tendons and the attached muscles will all have tightened
when you aren't using them at night. She had me get a lingth of cloth
which I put under the ball of my foot, and I pull up with both arms,
raising my thigh as high as I can off the bed. This stretches both the
bottom of the foot, the anckle, and the back of the leg all at once.

I walk several kilometers to work, and before doing so, I stand with the
ball of my foot on a step, and my ankle over the edge, and carefully add
weight to stretch the ankle. Do this one with care! I also do it
before dancing.

Finally, I try to spend twenty minutes or more stretching before I
dance. Raising my foot on a chair and and reaching forward seems to do
the most good. I also try to stretch after the dance.

With these stretches, I have been able to keep doing country dance, and
even some highland, with chronic tedonitus. I hope some of these
suggestions help.

-- Donald

_________________________
Donald F. Robertson
San Francisco

donaldrf@hooked.net
76217.2066@CompuServe.com
http://www.hooked.net/~donaldrf/index.html

The known is finite, the unknown is infinite; intellectually
we stand on an islet in the midst of an illimitable ocean of
inexplicability. Our business in every generation is to
reclaim a little more land. -- Thomas Huxley.

achilles tendon

Message 7345 · Donald F. Robertson · 11 Apr 1997 21:05:11 · Top

Martin Sheffield wrote:

> Try leaving you car in its garage -- your dancing comfort will improve
> immensely

I fully agree! While I do have chronic tendonitus, I am able to stay
active partially because I get lots of exercise. I do not own a car and
live in an inner city where everything I need in life is within an easy
walk. I get a lot of exercise as a metter of course, without having to
think about it, and it pays off in better health and, in general,
"feeling good" most of the day. Although in some ways I have a
high-stress job, I am rarely stressed out or depressed; there is no
"down" in the middle of the day.

I even walk (one way!) to work, although it's an hour-and-twenty-minute
effort. A long time, but I feel so much better when I've done it (and
so much worse when, for some reason, I can't) that it is more than worth
it. Many commuters I know spend just as much time sitting in traffic,
or "running errends": no wonder people are depressed! My advice to
dancers: move someplace you can walk and throw away the car. And,
you'll be doing the environment as much good as you do yourself.

-- Donald

_________________________
Donald F. Robertson
San Francisco

donaldrf@hooked.net
76217.2066@CompuServe.com
http://www.hooked.net/~donaldrf/index.html

The known is finite, the unknown is infinite; intellectually
we stand on an islet in the midst of an illimitable ocean of
inexplicability. Our business in every generation is to
reclaim a little more land. -- Thomas Huxley.

achilles tendon

Message 7347 · Thomas J. Senior · 11 Apr 1997 22:50:58 · Top

For what it is worth, here is my $.02 worth:
I've had sore achilles tendons for decades, and have found through trial
and error (weird as it may be) that two foods usually add to the
inflamation: green peppers and chocolate (not together! 8-; ). I can
pretty well do without green peppers, but the chocolate restriction is a
severe burden to my happiness, so i often will go a week or so before
indulging. There follows the reaction, fairly reliably.
Everything in moderation, i guess.

Those who can, do. Those who understand, teach.

Thomas J. Senior
New Trier High School 1232 St. Johns Ave
385 Winnetka Ave Highland Park, IL 60035-3425
Winnetka, IL 60093-4295 847-433-8704
847-446-7000 x2128 seniort@newtrier.k12.il.us

achilles tendon

Message 7349 · Susan Worland · 12 Apr 1997 01:09:41 · Top

At 01:58 PM 4/11/97 -0500, Tom wrote:
>For what it is worth, here is my $.02 worth:
> I've had sore achilles tendons for decades, and have found through trial
>and error (weird as it may be) that two foods usually add to the
>inflamation: green peppers and chocolate

Don't know about the chocolate, but the green pepper at least is not
surprising to me. Members of the nightshade family (including my favorites,
peppers, tomatoes, potatoes :-( and eggplants, as well as other people's
favorite, tobacco) are known to be hard on people with arthritis.

*************************************************************
Susan Worland | Phone: (508) 651-0070 x242
Web Development | Fax: (508) 651-0080
Onward Technologies, Inc. | email: susan@onwardtech.com
313 Speen Street | http://www.onwardtech.com
Natick, MA 01760

ONWARD TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
"Online Solutions. Bottom Line Results."
*************************************************************

achilles tendon

Message 7352 · Martin Sheffield · 12 Apr 1997 20:59:12 · Top

Donald wrote:
> Move someplace you can walk and throw away the car. And,
>you'll be doing the environment as much good as you do yourself.

-- This message shopuld be posted throughout the internet, and not only
for dancers.
If a few people followed Donald's advice, the world would begin to be a
liveable place again.
People selling exercise machines, bicycles without wheels and rowers that
don't float, would sell less, and so would the pahrmaceutical indistry, but
we would all live a little longer -- and dance our pas de basque with more
spring too !
It can be done.

Yours,
Martin,
Grenoble, France.

achilles tendon

Message 7357 · Brenda Claridge · 13 Apr 1997 09:36:07 · Top

>If a few people followed Donald's advice, the world would begin to be a
>liveable place again.

>It can be done.
>
Nothing I would like better and it may be fine for you, Martin. However,
most women living in cities would hesitate to walk *to* a dance, never mind
*from*. It may not be as dangerous as we have all come to fear, but who's
prepared to take the risk? Better to risk the battered muscles than a worse
alternative.
Brenda
claridge@ihug.co.nz

achilles tendon

Message 7360 · Martin Sheffield · 14 Apr 1997 01:08:53 · Top

Brenda wrote:
>However,
>most women living in cities would hesitate to walk *to* a dance, never mind
>*from*. It may not be as dangerous as we have all come to fear, but who's
>prepared to take the risk?

Certainly, as most dances take place in the evening, I quite understand
your reticence. But when Donald and I each recommended walking and cycling,
we were thinking of daytime activities (work and back).

Alternatively, try dancing in the afternoon, and walk home by daylight!

Quite apart from the walking issue:
We have been having afternoon dances about one Saturday a month, since the
hall we use had to be vacated by 6.30 pm. It is always very enjoyable,
since everyone seems in better shape than they would be for a late evening
dance, and afterwards we are ready to sit down and have a good meal and
chat together -- without the prospect of having to get back on the floor
with extra weight inside!
By which time it is dark, of course, and not many of us do with out a car
to get home -- well, the hall is 100 km away, so even Donald will excuse me
for that!

Yours,
Martin,
Grenoble, France.

achilles tendon

Message 7363 · Donald F. Robertson · 14 Apr 1997 09:19:58 · Top

I just read somewhere that if you include ALL risk, including the risk
of dying in an automobile accident, pedestrian-oriented inner cities are
actually safer than suburban communities with their long, dangerous
commutes by automobile.

-- Donald

Brenda Claridge wrote:
>
> >If a few people followed Donald's advice, the world would begin to be a
> >liveable place again.
>
> >It can be done.
> >
> Nothing I would like better and it may be fine for you, Martin. However,
> most women living in cities would hesitate to walk *to* a dance, never mind
> *from*. It may not be as dangerous as we have all come to fear, but who's
> prepared to take the risk? Better to risk the battered muscles than a worse
> alternative.
> Brenda
> claridge@ihug.co.nz

achilles tendon

Message 7366 · Lara D. Friedman · 14 Apr 1997 17:44:25 · Top

If we took this advice, it would mean the population of the U.S. would
probably be reduced by half. Since the U.S. is a young country that has had
its greatest population boom AFTER the car was invented, there aren't
very many places one can live here without a car: New York City, San
Francisco, Chicago, maybe Boston and Washington D.C.. As for the rest of
us, those of you who live in European towns and cities that were designed
more with the pedestrian in mind better make room for us...are you sure
you want a bunch of Americans descending on you? Most of our cities
are simply too sprawling and have inadequte public transportation to make
disposal of the automobile possible. My fiance and I purposely moved to
the city of Minneapolis (we grew up in the suburbs) so
that we could reduce our need for the automobile. Alas, though we are
able to reasonably limit ourselves to just one car rather than two (as is
the norm in most American households--one car per adult driver), it would
be pretty much impossible to get along with none at all.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Lara Friedman Semper Ubi
laradf@alumni.sils.umich.edu Sububi

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

On Sat, 12 Apr 1997, Martin Sheffield wrote:

> Donald wrote:
> > Move someplace you can walk and throw away the car. And,
> >you'll be doing the environment as much good as you do yourself.
>
> -- This message shopuld be posted throughout the internet, and not only
> for dancers.
> If a few people followed Donald's advice, the world would begin to be a
> liveable place again.
> People selling exercise machines, bicycles without wheels and rowers that
> don't float, would sell less, and so would the pahrmaceutical indistry, but
> we would all live a little longer -- and dance our pas de basque with more
> spring too !
> It can be done.
>
> Yours,
> Martin,
> Grenoble, France.
>
>
> --
> Martin Sheffield <Martin.Sheffield@wanadoo.fr>
>
>

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