strathspey Archive: Fugal Fergus (was Re: 48 bar dances)

Previous thread: Dances for those who know (was Hamilton Rant (was Twirling))
Next thread: Fugal Fergus vs. Waverley

Fugal Fergus (was Re: 48 bar dances)

Message 62371 · Lara Friedman-Shedlov · 15 Feb 2012 23:34:19 · Top

So this reminds me about a question I've had for a long time:

I like Fugal Fergus, and I like Waverley, but I have never understood
why Fugal Fergus is often substituted for Waverley at a dance, or why
Fugal Fergus almost never appears on the programs on its own. It's
not like Fugal Fergus is really a variation on Waverley. It bears
very little in common with Waverley other than the chasing figure, the
total number of bars, and the music. I enjoy dancing Waverley and
find it rather frustrating when other dancers in my set decide they
would rather do Fugal Fergus. Like I said, Fugal Fergus a great
dance, but why should Waverley always get bumped for its sake, and why
not just put Fugal Fergus on the program to begin with, if that's what
people want to do?

Lara Friedman-Shedlov
Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

*****************************
Lara Friedman~Shedlov
lfriedmanshedlov@gmail.com

*****************************

On Wed, Feb 15, 2012 at 4:21 PM, Becky Sager <bsager3@juno.com> wrote:
> How about Waverley? That's certainly the most popular 48-bar dance in the Atlanta area, though often some of us stack a set or two to do Fugal Fergus instead!  Yay Hugh Foss, again!  Becky
>

Fugal Fergus (was Re: 48 bar dances)

Message 62372 · Iain Boyd · 15 Feb 2012 23:47:33 · Top

Dear Lara,

Re you comments -

"I like Fugal Fergus, and I like Waverley, but I have never understood
why Fugal Fergus is often substituted for Waverley at a dance, or why
Fugal Fergus almost never appears on the programs on its own.  It's
not like Fugal Fergus is really a variation on Waverley."

"Fugal Fergus" is indeed a variation of "Waverley" and was devised with "Waverley" in mind!

They are both 48 bar jigs and are danced to the same original tune.

Both dances start with the same 'chases'. The difference is that Hugh Foss developed his 'fugal' theme so that after the 'chases' "Fugal Fergus" moves in a different direction, choreographically, than "Waverley".

Regards,

 
Iain Boyd

Postal Address -

P O Box 11-404
Wellington 6142
New Zealand

Fugal Fergus (was Re: 48 bar dances)

Message 62375 · Bruce Herbold · 15 Feb 2012 23:54:37 · Top

We just had a similar divisin of dances on our Valentine ball, one
side of the all was specified for St John River and the other for
Belle of Bon Accord. As with Waverley adn Fugal Fergus, I think this
is an attempt to alloweveryone to dance -- not just "those who know."
I admre that sentiment, but I find it very disconcerting when I notice
sets around me on teh dance floor doing something different than wha I
am doing -- it diminshes, for me, the enjoyment of a large hall of
dancers dancing together.

In the St John River/Belle combo both dances are suitable for a ball
and the 'advanced' one is not all that advanced so I don't think the
number of people excluded is that much of a concern (in fact the vast
majority of dancers headed for the Belle side of the hall and ended up
spilling back over all but one line.

In the Waverley/Fugal combo I think Fugal is more like one of Foss'
'madrigal' dances - more suited for a class or small group of friends
than teh braoder venue of a ball. And I think a whol hall dancing
Waverley is a delight to be part of .

Bruce Herbold
San Francisco

On 2/15/12, Iain Boyd <iain_boyd_scd@yahoo.co.nz> wrote:
> Dear Lara,
>
> Re you comments -
>
> "I like Fugal Fergus, and I like Waverley, but I have never understood
> why Fugal Fergus is often substituted for Waverley at a dance, or why
> Fugal Fergus almost never appears on the programs on its own. It's
> not like Fugal Fergus is really a variation on Waverley."
>
> "Fugal Fergus" is indeed a variation of "Waverley" and was devised with
> "Waverley" in mind!
>
>
> They are both 48 bar jigs and are danced to the same original tune.
>
>
> Both dances start with the same 'chases'. The difference is that Hugh Foss
> developed his 'fugal' theme so that after the 'chases' "Fugal Fergus" moves
> in a different direction, choreographically, than "Waverley".
>
> Regards,
>
>
> Iain Boyd
>
>
> Postal Address -
>
> P O Box 11-404
> Wellington 6142
> New Zealand
>

--
Bruce Herbold
San Francisco

"If 90% of the ideas you generate aren't absolutely worthless, then
you're not generating enough ideas". --Michael Artin

Fugal Fergus (was Re: 48 bar dances)

Message 62373 · Anselm Lingnau · 15 Feb 2012 23:53:36 · Top

Lara Friedman-Shedlov wrote:

> It's not like Fugal Fergus is really a variation on Waverley. It bears
> very little in common with Waverley other than the chasing figure, the
> total number of bars, and the music.

The relationship between Waverley and Fugal Fergus is a very subtle one
(remember that the dance, Waverley, is also called »Fergus McIver«, from the
character in the Sir Walter Scott novel, Waverley – hence »Fugal Fergus«).

Fugal Fergus misses out on the poussette and double triangles, which don't
lend themselves readily to the »fugal« treatment, but it does have the chase,
the setting and crossing over and back again (turned 90° to go across the
dance rather than up and down), and it substitutes »reels of three on the
sides« for the figures of eight that might just as well have been reels of
three in the original dance – Foss could have stuck with figures of eight but
it would have made for a dull dance for 2nd and 3rd couple. As it is, it is
really quite clever.

Anselm
--
Anselm Lingnau, Mainz/Mayence, Germany ................. anselm@strathspey.org
The man who makes no mistakes does not usually make anything.
-- William Connor Magee

Fugal Fergus (was Re: 48 bar dances)

Message 62374 · Rebecca Sager · 15 Feb 2012 23:52:51 · Top

Well, sometimes we do schedule Fugal Fergus in its own right. Sometimes we schedule Waverley OR Fugal Fergus, the MC saying - if you want to dance Waverley, join the line of sets to my right, Fugal Fergus to the left. The relationship IS the music, and the fact that Hugh Foss named the book in which Fugal Fergus is number 1, The Waverley Fugues. I much prefer Fugal Fergus, because being old and pas de Basque challenged, I'd rather reel than dance a poussette followed by double triangles. Becky

Becky Sager
Marietta GA USA
"Life is not about waiting for the storms to pass...it's about
learning how to dance in the rain." Vivian Greene

---------- Original Message ----------
From: Lara Friedman-Shedlov <lfriedmanshedlov@gmail.com>
To: strathspey@strathspey.org
Subject: Fugal Fergus (was Re: 48 bar dances)
Date: Wed, 15 Feb 2012 16:34:19 -0600

So this reminds me about a question I've had for a long time:

I like Fugal Fergus, and I like Waverley, but I have never understood
why Fugal Fergus is often substituted for Waverley at a dance, or why
Fugal Fergus almost never appears on the programs on its own. It's
not like Fugal Fergus is really a variation on Waverley. It bears
very little in common with Waverley other than the chasing figure, the
total number of bars, and the music. I enjoy dancing Waverley and
find it rather frustrating when other dancers in my set decide they
would rather do Fugal Fergus. Like I said, Fugal Fergus a great
dance, but why should Waverley always get bumped for its sake, and why
not just put Fugal Fergus on the program to begin with, if that's what
people want to do?

Lara Friedman-Shedlov
Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

*****************************
Lara Friedman~Shedlov
lfriedmanshedlov@gmail.com

*****************************

On Wed, Feb 15, 2012 at 4:21 PM, Becky Sager <bsager3@juno.com> wrote:
> How about Waverley? That's certainly the most popular 48-bar dance in the Atlanta area, though often some of us stack a set or two to do Fugal Fergus instead! &#65533;Yay Hugh Foss, again! &#65533;Becky
>

Fugal Fergus (was Re: 48 bar dances)

Message 62384 · Kent Smith · 16 Feb 2012 15:06:54 · Top

Since the Midwest of the U.S. figures prominently in this thread, with Lara in Minneapolis starting it and Mike in Madison contributing, let me add remembering years ago at the annual ball in Madison that the program had Waverly OR Fugual Fergus, but as first lady's choice. In bar 9, if the first lady started setting rather than standing still, one knew that round would be Fugual Fergus; standing still meant Waverley. Most sets ended up doing some of each dance. It worked very well as long as everyone was familiar with both dances, which was the case in Madison in those days (with people coming from Wisconsin, Illinois, Iowa, and Minnesota).

Kent
(now Connecticut, USA)

-----Original Message-----
From: Becky Sager [mailto:bsager3@juno.com]
Sent: Wednesday, February 15, 2012 5:53 PM
To: strathspey@strathspey.org
Subject: Re: Fugal Fergus (was Re: 48 bar dances)

Well, sometimes we do schedule Fugal Fergus in its own right. Sometimes we schedule Waverley OR Fugal Fergus, the MC saying - if you want to dance Waverley, join the line of sets to my right, Fugal Fergus to the left. The relationship IS the music, and the fact that Hugh Foss named the book in which Fugal Fergus is number 1, The Waverley Fugues. I much prefer Fugal Fergus, because being old and pas de Basque challenged, I'd rather reel than dance a poussette followed by double triangles. Becky

Becky Sager
Marietta GA USA
"Life is not about waiting for the storms to pass...it's about
learning how to dance in the rain." Vivian Greene

---------- Original Message ----------
From: Lara Friedman-Shedlov <lfriedmanshedlov@gmail.com>
To: strathspey@strathspey.org
Subject: Fugal Fergus (was Re: 48 bar dances)
Date: Wed, 15 Feb 2012 16:34:19 -0600

So this reminds me about a question I've had for a long time:

I like Fugal Fergus, and I like Waverley, but I have never understood
why Fugal Fergus is often substituted for Waverley at a dance, or why
Fugal Fergus almost never appears on the programs on its own. It's
not like Fugal Fergus is really a variation on Waverley. It bears
very little in common with Waverley other than the chasing figure, the
total number of bars, and the music. I enjoy dancing Waverley and
find it rather frustrating when other dancers in my set decide they
would rather do Fugal Fergus. Like I said, Fugal Fergus a great
dance, but why should Waverley always get bumped for its sake, and why
not just put Fugal Fergus on the program to begin with, if that's what
people want to do?

Lara Friedman-Shedlov
Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

*****************************
Lara Friedman~Shedlov
lfriedmanshedlov@gmail.com

*****************************

On Wed, Feb 15, 2012 at 4:21 PM, Becky Sager <bsager3@juno.com> wrote:
> How about Waverley? That's certainly the most popular 48-bar dance in the Atlanta area, though often some of us stack a set or two to do Fugal Fergus instead! &#65533;Yay Hugh Foss, again! &#65533;Becky
>

Fugal Fergus (was Re: 48 bar dances)

Message 62385 · Anselm Lingnau · 16 Feb 2012 15:34:20 · Top

Kent W. Smith wrote:

> […] years ago at the annual ball in Madison that the program had
> Waverly OR Fugual Fergus, but as first lady's choice. In bar 9, if the
> first lady started setting rather than standing still, one knew that round
> would be Fugual Fergus; standing still meant Waverley.

Cool. Those were the days …

Anselm
--
Anselm Lingnau, Mainz/Mayence, Germany ................. anselm@strathspey.org
Calling Atheism a religion is like calling bald a hair color.
-- Don Hirschberg

Fugal Fergus (was Re: 48 bar dances)

Message 62386 · Angela Bulteel · 16 Feb 2012 17:35:53 · Top

Those indeed were the days. I remember a Christmas scottish dance party at
which an 8/32 jig was played and each couple had to do a different dance,
WITHOUT telling the other couples in the set which it was, and they just had
to think on their feet and join in. (experienced dancers only of course)
all good clean fun!!

----- Original Message -----
From: "Anselm Lingnau" <anselm@strathspey.org>
To: <strathspey@strathspey.org>
Sent: Thursday, February 16, 2012 2:34 PM
Subject: Re: Fugal Fergus (was Re: 48 bar dances)

Kent W. Smith wrote:

> […] years ago at the annual ball in Madison that the program had
> Waverly OR Fugual Fergus, but as first lady's choice. In bar 9, if the
> first lady started setting rather than standing still, one knew that round
> would be Fugual Fergus; standing still meant Waverley.

Cool. Those were the days …

Anselm
--
Anselm Lingnau, Mainz/Mayence, Germany .................
anselm@strathspey.org
Calling Atheism a religion is like calling bald a hair color.
-- Don
Hirschberg

Fugal Fergus (was Re: 48 bar dances)

Message 62387 · Sue Ronald · 16 Feb 2012 18:40:14 · Top

Angela Bulteel wrote............
"Those indeed were the days. I remember a Christmas scottish dance party at
which an 8/32 jig was played and each couple had to do a different dance,
WITHOUT telling the other couples in the set which it was, and they just
had to think on their feet and join in. (experienced dancers only of
course) all good clean fun!!"

So, why have things changed?"

Are there simply too many dances out there now that thoroughly mastering
some is too daunting a task?

Have dancers become lazy and less willing to put in the time and effort to
learn dances properly?

Have teachers become less demanding of their classes and inadvertently
developed a culture of dependency; dancers always needing a walk-through or
briefing?

Do we just have to resign ourselves to the fact that the days Angela
describes have gone forever?

I hope not!

Sue Ronald
New York

On Thu, Feb 16, 2012 at 11:35 AM, Angela Bulteel <a.bulteel@talktalk.net>wrote:

> Those indeed were the days. I remember a Christmas scottish dance party at
> which an 8/32 jig was played and each couple had to do a different dance,
> WITHOUT telling the other couples in the set which it was, and they just
> had to think on their feet and join in. (experienced dancers only of
> course) all good clean fun!!
>
>
> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Anselm Lingnau" <anselm@strathspey.org
> >
> To: <strathspey@strathspey.org>
> Sent: Thursday, February 16, 2012 2:34 PM
> Subject: Re: Fugal Fergus (was Re: 48 bar dances)
>
>
> Kent W. Smith wrote:
>
> […] years ago at the annual ball in Madison that the program had
>> Waverly OR Fugual Fergus, but as first lady's choice. In bar 9, if the
>> first lady started setting rather than standing still, one knew that round
>> would be Fugual Fergus; standing still meant Waverley.
>>
>
> Cool. Those were the days …
>
> Anselm
> --
> Anselm Lingnau, Mainz/Mayence, Germany .................
> anselm@strathspey.org
> Calling Atheism a religion is like calling bald a hair color.
> -- Don
> Hirschberg
>

Fugal Fergus (was Re: 48 bar dances)

Message 62392 · Alasdair Graham · 16 Feb 2012 19:47:00 · Top

Some groups here in the West of Scotland, who are not 'slaves' to the RSCDS
still practice Angela's remembered style where each couple dance two
different dances in the set. They normally state as they start, which dance
they are dancing. The East Kilbride Highlander Group is one in particular.
No re-caps either. But they do mix in other styles of dancing so not a
constant set dance event.

The current teaching of the Society Groups here seems to brainwash the
dancers and they are not encouraged to think for themselves. They are told
there will be recaps and walkthroughs if required.
Groups like the East Kilbride Highlanders are attracting full halls at their
dances, which should tell us something. The Branch dances struggle at times
to cover costs.

Alasdair Graham
Dumbarton, Scotland

Looking for a dance?
Call up http://www.dancediary.info
to see if something suits.
Ceilidh Dance Pages
Country Dance Pages & Newsletter.

Angela Bulteel wrote............
"Those indeed were the days. I remember a Christmas scottish dance party at
which an 8/32 jig was played and each couple had to do a different dance,
WITHOUT telling the other couples in the set which it was, and they just had
to think on their feet and join in. (experienced dancers only of
course) all good clean fun!!"

So, why have things changed?"

Are there simply too many dances out there now that thoroughly mastering
some is too daunting a task?

Have dancers become lazy and less willing to put in the time and effort to
learn dances properly?

Have teachers become less demanding of their classes and inadvertently
developed a culture of dependency; dancers always needing a walk-through or
briefing?

Do we just have to resign ourselves to the fact that the days Angela
describes have gone forever?

I hope not!

Sue Ronald
New York

Fugal Fergus (was Re: 48 bar dances)

Message 62396 · Angela Bulteel · 16 Feb 2012 20:09:08 · Top

I think the suggestion below from Sue Ronald is worthy of further discussion
as I believe it is the crux of the matter. In my experience a lot of weekly
classes now concentrate on "learning" new dances every class night. But do
we actually learn them? - Or are we just walking them through, dancing them
once and then forgetting them. In the "old days" (dare I say), we might, at
class, learn one new dance. (as there were not so many being devised) and
then for the following weeks, this new dance would be gone through until we
all new it perfectly. These days, the average "class" consists of going
through many new dances every week, and the brain can only take so much
information. With an odd exception, the majority "learned" at these classes
will never be seen or heard of again. However, this may be construed as the
pot calling the kettle black as I am adding to the problem by forever
devising new dances myself, so apologies to all, for my opinions.
But having said that, I do feel that too little is done to teach a dance
fully, to ensure pupils can say with confidence, "I know this dance well",
and not have to pray to be 4th couple in a set, when another new one comes
up on a dance programme.
And finally, I should add that life, and Sottish country dancing would be
very dull indeed if we kept doing the same hundred or so dances week in week
out, ad infinitum, and sadly can suggest no happy medium to suit all!!
Angela

----- Original Message -----
From: "Sue Ronald" <sjr280@gmail.com>
To: <strathspey@strathspey.org>
Sent: Thursday, February 16, 2012 5:40 PM
Subject: Re: Fugal Fergus (was Re: 48 bar dances)

So, why have things changed?"

Are there simply too many dances out there now that thoroughly mastering
some is too daunting a task?

On Thu, Feb 16, 2012 at 11:35 AM, Angela Bulteel
<a.bulteel@talktalk.net>wrote:

> Those indeed were the days. I remember a Christmas scottish dance party at
> which an 8/32 jig was played and each couple had to do a different dance,
> WITHOUT telling the other couples in the set which it was, and they just
> had to think on their feet and join in. (experienced dancers only of
> course) all good clean fun!!
>
>
> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Anselm Lingnau" <anselm@strathspey.org
> >
> To: <strathspey@strathspey.org>
> Sent: Thursday, February 16, 2012 2:34 PM
> Subject: Re: Fugal Fergus (was Re: 48 bar dances)
>
>
> Kent W. Smith wrote:
>
> […] years ago at the annual ball in Madison that the program had
>> Waverly OR Fugual Fergus, but as first lady's choice. In bar 9, if the
>> first lady started setting rather than standing still, one knew that
>> round
>> would be Fugual Fergus; standing still meant Waverley.
>>
>
> Cool. Those were the days …
>
> Anselm
> --
> Anselm Lingnau, Mainz/Mayence, Germany .................
> anselm@strathspey.org
> Calling Atheism a religion is like calling bald a hair color.
> -- Don
> Hirschberg
>

Fugal Fergus (was Re: 48 bar dances)

Message 62399 · sylviasmiskoe@aol.com · 16 Feb 2012 20:51:25 · Top

When there are 1-3 dance parties every month and there are 12 to 16 dances per party, teachers are under pressure to teach all the dances being offered. The programs do not have much repetition. Therefore there isn't much chance that there will be a lot of time spent on each dance.
Sylvia Miskoe Concord, NH USA

-----Original Message-----
From: Angela Bulteel <a.bulteel@talktalk.net>
To: strathspey <strathspey@strathspey.org>
Sent: Thu, Feb 16, 2012 2:08 pm
Subject: Re: Fugal Fergus (was Re: 48 bar dances)

I think the suggestion below from Sue Ronald is worthy of further discussion
s I believe it is the crux of the matter. In my experience a lot of weekly
lasses now concentrate on "learning" new dances every class night. But do
e actually learn them? - Or are we just walking them through, dancing them
nce and then forgetting them. In the "old days" (dare I say), we might, at
lass, learn one new dance. (as there were not so many being devised) and
hen for the following weeks, this new dance would be gone through until we
ll new it perfectly. These days, the average "class" consists of going
hrough many new dances every week, and the brain can only take so much
nformation. With an odd exception, the majority "learned" at these classes
ill never be seen or heard of again. However, this may be construed as the
ot calling the kettle black as I am adding to the problem by forever
evising new dances myself, so apologies to all, for my opinions.
ut having said that, I do feel that too little is done to teach a dance
ully, to ensure pupils can say with confidence, "I know this dance well",
nd not have to pray to be 4th couple in a set, when another new one comes
p on a dance programme.
nd finally, I should add that life, and Sottish country dancing would be
ery dull indeed if we kept doing the same hundred or so dances week in week
ut, ad infinitum, and sadly can suggest no happy medium to suit all!!
ngela

---- Original Message -----
rom: "Sue Ronald" <sjr280@gmail.com>
o: <strathspey@strathspey.org>
ent: Thursday, February 16, 2012 5:40 PM
ubject: Re: Fugal Fergus (was Re: 48 bar dances)

o, why have things changed?"
Are there simply too many dances out there now that thoroughly mastering
ome is too daunting a task?

On Thu, Feb 16, 2012 at 11:35 AM, Angela Bulteel
a.bulteel@talktalk.net>wrote:
> Those indeed were the days. I remember a Christmas scottish dance party at
which an 8/32 jig was played and each couple had to do a different dance,
WITHOUT telling the other couples in the set which it was, and they just
had to think on their feet and join in. (experienced dancers only of
course) all good clean fun!!

----- Original Message ----- From: "Anselm Lingnau" <anselm@strathspey.org
>
To: <strathspey@strathspey.org>
Sent: Thursday, February 16, 2012 2:34 PM
Subject: Re: Fugal Fergus (was Re: 48 bar dances)

Kent W. Smith wrote:

[…] years ago at the annual ball in Madison that the program had
> Waverly OR Fugual Fergus, but as first lady's choice. In bar 9, if the
> first lady started setting rather than standing still, one knew that
> round
> would be Fugual Fergus; standing still meant Waverley.
>

Cool. Those were the days …

Anselm
--
Anselm Lingnau, Mainz/Mayence, Germany .................
anselm@strathspey.org
Calling Atheism a religion is like calling bald a hair color.
-- Don
Hirschberg

Fugal Fergus (was Re: 48 bar dances)

Message 62416 · e.ferguson · 17 Feb 2012 13:04:44 · Top

I fully agree. In the two classes I attend, nearly all dances are
"new" each week, and the majority of dancers make no effort to learn
any dance "for keeps". Thus no "core repertoire of known dances" is
ever built up.

If each "new" dance for the class was repeated in successive weeks,
giving diminishing support and at the end even no recap, I am sure
every class could develop a solid "core repertoire". Any "event"
would make good use of this. It would give dancers more confidence,
making the events more enjoyable, Dancers from elsewhere would know
that everyone could help them. It would open opportunities to give
more attention to dancing beautifully. In class, it would give more
time actually dancing. I see no disadvantages.

Happy dancing,

Eric

On 16 Feb 2012 at 19:09, Angela Bulteel wrote:

> I think the suggestion below from Sue Ronald is worthy of further discussion
> as I believe it is the crux of the matter.

> In my experience a lot of weekly classes now concentrate on
> "learning" new dances every class night. But do we actually learn
> them? - Or are we just walking them through, dancing them once
> and then forgetting them. In the "old days" (dare I say), we
> might, at class, learn one new dance. (as there were not so many
> being devised) and then for the following weeks, this new dance
> would be gone through until we all new it perfectly.

> These days, the average "class" consists of going through many new
> dances every week, and the brain can only take so much information.
> With an odd exception, the majority "learned" at these classes
> will never be seen or heard of again.

> However, this may be construed as the pot calling the kettle black
> as I am adding to the problem by forever devising new dances
> myself, so apologies to all, for my opinions.

> But having said that, I do feel that too little is done to teach a
> dance fully, to ensure pupils can say with confidence, "I know this
> dance well", and not have to pray to be 4th couple in a set, when
> another new one comes up on a dance programme.

> And finally, I should add that life, and Sottish country dancing
> would be very dull indeed if we kept doing the same hundred or so
> dances week in week out, ad infinitum, and sadly can suggest no
> happy medium to suit all!!

> Angela
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Sue Ronald" <sjr280@gmail.com>
> To: <strathspey@strathspey.org>
> Sent: Thursday, February 16, 2012 5:40 PM
> Subject: Re: Fugal Fergus (was Re: 48 bar dances)
>
>
> So, why have things changed?"
>
> Are there simply too many dances out there now that thoroughly mastering
> some is too daunting a task?
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On Thu, Feb 16, 2012 at 11:35 AM, Angela Bulteel
> <a.bulteel@talktalk.net>wrote:
>
> > Those indeed were the days. I remember a Christmas scottish dance party at
> > which an 8/32 jig was played and each couple had to do a different dance,
> > WITHOUT telling the other couples in the set which it was, and they just
> > had to think on their feet and join in. (experienced dancers only of
> > course) all good clean fun!!
> >
> >
> > ----- Original Message ----- From: "Anselm Lingnau" <anselm@strathspey.org
> > >
> > To: <strathspey@strathspey.org>
> > Sent: Thursday, February 16, 2012 2:34 PM
> > Subject: Re: Fugal Fergus (was Re: 48 bar dances)
> >
> >
> > Kent W. Smith wrote:
> >
> > […] years ago at the annual ball in Madison that the program had
> >> Waverly OR Fugual Fergus, but as first lady's choice. In bar 9, if the
> >> first lady started setting rather than standing still, one knew that
> >> round
> >> would be Fugual Fergus; standing still meant Waverley.
> >>
> >
> > Cool. Those were the days …
> >
> > Anselm
> > --
> > Anselm Lingnau, Mainz/Mayence, Germany .................
> > anselm@strathspey.org
> > Calling Atheism a religion is like calling bald a hair color.
> > -- Don
> > Hirschberg
> >
>
>

--
Eric T. Ferguson,
van Reenenweg 3, 3702 SB ZEIST Netherlands
tel: +31 30-2673638

Fugal Fergus (was Re: 48 bar dances)

Message 62443 · Denise Smith · 18 Feb 2012 09:48:10 · Top

We are running a 6 week program in our Intermediate/Advanced Technique
classes in Brisbane. The 1st dance is the new dance from the week before,
the 2 nd dance is a new dance, the 3rd dance is from 2 weeks ago, 4 th
dance from 3 weeks ago, 5 th dance from 4 weeks ago and 6 th dance from 5
weeks ago - it then drops off the program. The program always has 6 dances
on it. The teacher only needs to prepare one dance a week - and the dancers
are given 6 weeks to refine a dance.
We were exposed to this method in our classes in Darwin under the tuition
of Angus Henry. It always worked well, everyone enjoyed it and it helped
people to become better dancers. The Brisbane dancers also enjoy it.

On Fri, Feb 17, 2012 at 10:04 PM, Eric Ferguson <e.ferguson@antenna.nl>wrote:

> I fully agree. In the two classes I attend, nearly all dances are
> "new" each week, and the majority of dancers make no effort to learn
> any dance "for keeps". Thus no "core repertoire of known dances" is
> ever built up.
>
> If each "new" dance for the class was repeated in successive weeks,
> giving diminishing support and at the end even no recap, I am sure
> every class could develop a solid "core repertoire". Any "event"
> would make good use of this. It would give dancers more confidence,
> making the events more enjoyable, Dancers from elsewhere would know
> that everyone could help them. It would open opportunities to give
> more attention to dancing beautifully. In class, it would give more
> time actually dancing. I see no disadvantages.
>
> Happy dancing,
>
> Eric
>
>
>
> On 16 Feb 2012 at 19:09, Angela Bulteel wrote:
>
> > I think the suggestion below from Sue Ronald is worthy of further
> discussion
> > as I believe it is the crux of the matter.
>
> > In my experience a lot of weekly classes now concentrate on
> > "learning" new dances every class night. But do we actually learn
> > them? - Or are we just walking them through, dancing them once
> > and then forgetting them. In the "old days" (dare I say), we
> > might, at class, learn one new dance. (as there were not so many
> > being devised) and then for the following weeks, this new dance
> > would be gone through until we all new it perfectly.
>
> > These days, the average "class" consists of going through many new
> > dances every week, and the brain can only take so much information.
> > With an odd exception, the majority "learned" at these classes
> > will never be seen or heard of again.
>
> > However, this may be construed as the pot calling the kettle black
> > as I am adding to the problem by forever devising new dances
> > myself, so apologies to all, for my opinions.
>
> > But having said that, I do feel that too little is done to teach a
> > dance fully, to ensure pupils can say with confidence, "I know this
> > dance well", and not have to pray to be 4th couple in a set, when
> > another new one comes up on a dance programme.
>
> > And finally, I should add that life, and Sottish country dancing
> > would be very dull indeed if we kept doing the same hundred or so
> > dances week in week out, ad infinitum, and sadly can suggest no
> > happy medium to suit all!!
>
> > Angela
> >
> >
> > ----- Original Message -----
> > From: "Sue Ronald" <sjr280@gmail.com>
> > To: <strathspey@strathspey.org>
> > Sent: Thursday, February 16, 2012 5:40 PM
> > Subject: Re: Fugal Fergus (was Re: 48 bar dances)
> >
> >
> > So, why have things changed?"
> >
> > Are there simply too many dances out there now that thoroughly mastering
> > some is too daunting a task?
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > On Thu, Feb 16, 2012 at 11:35 AM, Angela Bulteel
> > <a.bulteel@talktalk.net>wrote:
> >
> > > Those indeed were the days. I remember a Christmas scottish dance
> party at
> > > which an 8/32 jig was played and each couple had to do a different
> dance,
> > > WITHOUT telling the other couples in the set which it was, and they
> just
> > > had to think on their feet and join in. (experienced dancers only of
> > > course) all good clean fun!!
> > >
> > >
> > > ----- Original Message ----- From: "Anselm Lingnau" <
> anselm@strathspey.org
> > > >
> > > To: <strathspey@strathspey.org>
> > > Sent: Thursday, February 16, 2012 2:34 PM
> > > Subject: Re: Fugal Fergus (was Re: 48 bar dances)
> > >
> > >
> > > Kent W. Smith wrote:
> > >
> > > […] years ago at the annual ball in Madison that the program had
> > >> Waverly OR Fugual Fergus, but as first lady's choice. In bar 9, if the
> > >> first lady started setting rather than standing still, one knew that
> > >> round
> > >> would be Fugual Fergus; standing still meant Waverley.
> > >>
> > >
> > > Cool. Those were the days …
> > >
> > > Anselm
> > > --
> > > Anselm Lingnau, Mainz/Mayence, Germany .................
> > > anselm@strathspey.org
> > > Calling Atheism a religion is like calling bald a hair color.
> > > -- Don
> > > Hirschberg
> > >
> >
> >
>
>
> --
> Eric T. Ferguson,
> van Reenenweg 3, 3702 SB ZEIST Netherlands
> tel: +31 30-2673638
>
>

--
Denise Smith
76 Celandine St
Shailer Park Qld 4128
+617 3209 7006
pauldenise3@bigpond.com

Fugal Fergus (was Re: 48 bar dances)

Message 62389 · marjoriem · 16 Feb 2012 18:52:42 · Top

This does bring back fond memories of similar "first lady's choice" for
Waverley or Fugal Fergus at San Francisco Branch events.

Marjorie McLaughlin
San Diego



-------Original Message-------

From: Smith, Kent W.
Date: 2/16/2012 6:04:34 AM
To: strathspey@strathspey.org
Subject: RE: Fugal Fergus (was Re: 48 bar dances)

Since the Midwest of the U.S. figures prominently in this thread, with Lara
in Minneapolis starting it and Mike in Madison contributing, let me add
remembering years ago at the annual ball in Madison that the program had
Waverly OR Fugual Fergus, but as first lady's choice. In bar 9, if the first
lady started setting rather than standing still, one knew that round would
be Fugual Fergus; standing still meant Waverley. Most sets ended up doing
some of each dance. It worked very well as long as everyone was familiar
with both dances, which was the case in Madison in those days (with people
coming from Wisconsin, Illinois, Iowa, and Minnesota).

Kent
(now Connecticut, USA)

-----Original Message-----
From: Becky Sager [mailto:bsager3@juno.com]
Sent: Wednesday, February 15, 2012 5:53 PM
To: strathspey@strathspey.org
Subject: Re: Fugal Fergus (was Re: 48 bar dances)

Well, sometimes we do schedule Fugal Fergus in its own right. Sometimes we
schedule Waverley OR Fugal Fergus, the MC saying - if you want to dance
Waverley, join the line of sets to my right, Fugal Fergus to the left. The
relationship IS the music, and the fact that Hugh Foss named the book in
which Fugal Fergus is number 1, The Waverley Fugues. I much prefer Fugal
Fergus, because being old and pas de Basque challenged, I'd rather reel than
dance a poussette followed by double triangles. Becky


Becky Sager
Marietta GA USA
"Life is not about waiting for the storms to pass...it's about
learning how to dance in the rain." Vivian Greene



---------- Original Message ----------
From: Lara Friedman-Shedlov <lfriedmanshedlov@gmail.com>
To: strathspey@strathspey.org
Subject: Fugal Fergus (was Re: 48 bar dances)
Date: Wed, 15 Feb 2012 16:34:19 -0600

So this reminds me about a question I've had for a long time:

I like Fugal Fergus, and I like Waverley, but I have never understood
why Fugal Fergus is often substituted for Waverley at a dance, or why
Fugal Fergus almost never appears on the programs on its own. It's
not like Fugal Fergus is really a variation on Waverley. It bears
very little in common with Waverley other than the chasing figure, the
total number of bars, and the music. I enjoy dancing Waverley and
find it rather frustrating when other dancers in my set decide they
would rather do Fugal Fergus. Like I said, Fugal Fergus a great
dance, but why should Waverley always get bumped for its sake, and why
not just put Fugal Fergus on the program to begin with, if that's what
people want to do?

Lara Friedman-Shedlov
Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

*****************************
Lara Friedman~Shedlov
lfriedmanshedlov@gmail.com

*****************************

On Wed, Feb 15, 2012 at 4:21 PM, Becky Sager <bsager3@juno.com> wrote:
> How about Waverley? That's certainly the most popular 48-bar dance in the
Atlanta area, though often some of us stack a set or two to do Fugal Fergus
instead! &#65533;Yay Hugh Foss, again! &#65533;Becky
>

Previous thread: Dances for those who know (was Hamilton Rant (was Twirling))
Next thread: Fugal Fergus vs. Waverley
A Django site.