strathspey Archive: 3-couple sets for 2-couple dances...the term "double progression"

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3-couple sets for 2-couple dances...the term "double progression"

Message 60642 · Volleyballjerry · 8 Apr 2011 02:28:06 · Top

Pat, that's VERY interesting about the usage of the term "double
progression." It has been in common and continuous use in Southern California to
describe the alternating circumstance of two groups of two couples dancing
together in a four-couple set doing a two-couple dance for as long as I have
been dancing, i.e., since the latter 1970s. Are we unique in that usage?!

What then DO you call the circumstance which I have always called (as I
learned from others hereabouts decades ago!)...and have ne'er heard called
anything else..."double progression"?

Robb


In a message dated 4/7/2011 5:09:00 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
ruggierop@earthlink.net writes:

Robb, possibly where you lost Martin is in the fact that in ECD usage,
"double progression" means that the 1st cpl progresses past TWO cpls during
one repetition of the dance.

What you describe is, indeed, a very nice feature of a 2-cpl dance done in
the 4-cpl set, but I have never seen such described as "double progression"
in any of the old books, and I myself would never use the term the way you
have.

Around here (mid-Atlantic region) 2-cpl dances are usually done in the
4-cpl
set (assuming the numbers allow); there is the *occasional* decision to
dance them in a 3-cpl set. Myself, I feel that if it's worth doing twice,
it's worth doing three times, and usually lament finding myself as 4th cpl,
the only cpl who doesn't get that third repetition.

Pat
Charlottesville, Virginia
USA

> Martin, I don't know where I may have lost you...I thought that what I
> wrote as quite clear. A "2 in a 4" has double progression every other
> round,
> whereïn all four couples are dancing together,
>
> Robb
>
> Hi, Robb.
> Could you enlighten me, please.
> I am getting more and more out of touch with colloquial English
language
> usage,
>

3-couple sets for 2-couple dances...the term "double progression"

Message 60643 · Lee Fuell · 8 Apr 2011 03:01:00 · Top

The RSCDS manual simply calls it "Progressing in two-couple dances" and presents it as the normal progression for a two-couple dance in a four-couple set.

"3.1.2 Progressing in two-couple dances
In dances requiring two couples, the dancing couple progress one place at a time and
finish in the fourth place having completed the dance three times. The 2nd couple, as the
new top couple, begin the dance on the third repetition of the dance, the 3rd couple on the fifth and the 4th couple on the seventh. It is usual to dance a two-couple dance eight
times, which means that the 4th couple dance twice only, to finish in third place."

Lee

Beavercreek, OH, USA

-----Original Message-----
>From: Volleyballjerry@aol.com
>Sent: Apr 7, 2011 8:28 PM
>To: strathspey@strathspey.org
>Subject: Re: 3-couple sets for 2-couple dances...the term "double progression"
>
>Pat, that's VERY interesting about the usage of the term "double
>progression." It has been in common and continuous use in Southern California to
>describe the alternating circumstance of two groups of two couples dancing
>together in a four-couple set doing a two-couple dance for as long as I have
>been dancing, i.e., since the latter 1970s. Are we unique in that usage?!
>
>What then DO you call the circumstance which I have always called (as I
>learned from others hereabouts decades ago!)...and have ne'er heard called
>anything else..."double progression"?
>
>Robb
>
>
>In a message dated 4/7/2011 5:09:00 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
>ruggierop@earthlink.net writes:
>
>Robb, possibly where you lost Martin is in the fact that in ECD usage,
>"double progression" means that the 1st cpl progresses past TWO cpls during
>one repetition of the dance.
>
>What you describe is, indeed, a very nice feature of a 2-cpl dance done in
>the 4-cpl set, but I have never seen such described as "double progression"
>in any of the old books, and I myself would never use the term the way you
>have.
>
>Around here (mid-Atlantic region) 2-cpl dances are usually done in the
>4-cpl
>set (assuming the numbers allow); there is the *occasional* decision to
>dance them in a 3-cpl set. Myself, I feel that if it's worth doing twice,
>it's worth doing three times, and usually lament finding myself as 4th cpl,
>the only cpl who doesn't get that third repetition.
>
>Pat
>Charlottesville, Virginia
>USA

3-couple sets for 2-couple dances...the term "double progression"

Message 60645 · Patricia Ruggiero · 8 Apr 2011 04:25:27 · Top

Lee wrote:

> The RSCDS manual simply calls it "Progressing in two-couple dances" and
> presents it as the normal progression for a two-couple dance in a four-
> couple set.

Exactly.

After all, in "longways for as many as will" we don't refer to 2, 3, 4, or n cpls progressing down the set as a 2, 3, 4, or n progression.

Pat

3-couple sets for 2-couple dances...the term "double progression"

Message 60648 · Martin Campoveja · 8 Apr 2011 10:09:15 · Top

Thank you, Pat and Lee, for you explanations.

Indeed, I can see no difference in progression, be it a 2- or a 3-couple
dance, or a 3- or ac 4-couple set. In SCD, you progress one place at a
time, except in some 5-cp dances, but even these are never referred to as
having "double progression".

The advantage of keeping to 4-cp sets is that you get to dance with
different faces each time through, whereas, when you have only 3 cps, the
scenery is not so varied.

Back to vocabulary; is "sigue" used this side of the Atlantic?

Martin

3-couple sets for 2-couple dances...the term "double progression"

Message 60650 · Anselm Lingnau · 8 Apr 2011 10:50:39 · Top

Martin Sheffield wrote:

> In SCD, you progress one place at a
> time, except in some 5-cp dances, but even these are never referred to as
> having "double progression".

And of course there are those dances where 1st couple ends up at the bottom
(having progressed, e.g., three places in a four-couple set) as well as the
fairly new-fangled practice of mixing up the whole set so the new order is
something like 2413.

Anselm
--
Anselm Lingnau, Mainz/Mayence, Germany ................. anselm@strathspey.org
I think the main reason so many diet books are packed with information about
food, special recipes, and the like is that it's a useful way to pad out the
essential message of a diet book, »eat less food,« into something thick enough
to be visible on the shelf. -- John Walker

3-couple sets for 2-couple dances

Message 60651 · kate carpenter · 8 Apr 2011 11:02:55 · Top

Our group (in England) starts 2cpl dances in a 4cpl set with the first AND third couples so everyone gets to dance three times. Seems much fairer to me, and it is a long wait for the 4th cpl to begin dancing otherwise. When I went to America on holiday and went to several classes and a party, I was told that you never do it that way in America. Seems a shame - everyone is there to dance, not to stand waiting. I would say that we dance them 8x mostly, cutting it to 6x at the beginning of a dance(before everyone has warmed up) or at the end (when people are more tired), or if tight for time, but I can't see the point in that as it only saves 1 minute.
Kate

> The RSCDS manual simply calls it "Progressing in two-couple dances" and presents it as the normal progression for a two-couple dance in a four-couple set.
>
> "3.1.2 Progressing in two-couple dances
> In dances requiring two couples, the dancing couple progress one place at a time and
> finish in the fourth place having completed the dance three times. The 2nd couple, as the
> new top couple, begin the dance on the third repetition of the dance, the 3rd couple on the fifth and the 4th couple on the seventh. It is usual to dance a two-couple dance eight
> times, which means that the 4th couple dance twice only, to finish in third place."
>
> Lee
>
> Beavercreek, OH, USA
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> >From: Volleyballjerry@aol.com
> >Sent: Apr 7, 2011 8:28 PM
> >To: strathspey@strathspey.org
> >Subject: Re: 3-couple sets for 2-couple dances...the term "double progression"
> >
> >Pat, that's VERY interesting about the usage of the term "double
> >progression." It has been in common and continuous use in Southern California to
> >describe the alternating circumstance of two groups of two couples dancing
> >together in a four-couple set doing a two-couple dance for as long as I have
> >been dancing, i.e., since the latter 1970s. Are we unique in that usage?!
> >
> >What then DO you call the circumstance which I have always called (as I
> >learned from others hereabouts decades ago!)...and have ne'er heard called
> >anything else..."double progression"?
> >
> >Robb
> >
> >
> >In a message dated 4/7/2011 5:09:00 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
> >ruggierop@earthlink.net writes:
> >
> >Robb, possibly where you lost Martin is in the fact that in ECD usage,
> >"double progression" means that the 1st cpl progresses past TWO cpls during
> >one repetition of the dance.
> >
> >What you describe is, indeed, a very nice feature of a 2-cpl dance done in
> >the 4-cpl set, but I have never seen such described as "double progression"
> >in any of the old books, and I myself would never use the term the way you
> >have.
> >
> >Around here (mid-Atlantic region) 2-cpl dances are usually done in the
> >4-cpl
> >set (assuming the numbers allow); there is the *occasional* decision to
> >dance them in a 3-cpl set. Myself, I feel that if it's worth doing twice,
> >it's worth doing three times, and usually lament finding myself as 4th cpl,
> >the only cpl who doesn't get that third repetition.
> >
> >Pat
> >Charlottesville, Virginia
> >USA
>

3-couple sets for 2-couple dances

Message 60657 · e.ferguson · 8 Apr 2011 15:38:19 · Top

On formal occasions it may be well to preserve the tradition that
only 1st and 2nd cpls start the dance (leaving 3rd and 4th cpl one
turn short).

In less formal occasions and in class why not let 2nd and 3rd couples
start? Then everyone gets 3 turns, and the dance ends with all
couples dancing: it's a much more satifying finale than having top
and bottom couples stand waiting.

Eric

On 8 Apr 2011 at 10:02, Kate Carpenter wrote:

> Our group (in England) starts 2cpl dances in a 4cpl set with the
> first AND third couples so everyone gets to dance three times.
> Seems much fairer to me, and it is a long wait for the 4th cpl to
> begin dancing otherwise. When I went to America on holiday and
> went to several classes and a party, I was told that you never do
> it that way in America. Seems a shame - everyone is there to
> dance, not to stand waiting. I would say that we dance them 8x
> mostly, cutting it to 6x at the beginning of a dance(before
> everyone has warmed up) or at the end (when people are more
> tired), or if tight for time, but I can't see the point in that as
> it only saves 1 minute.

> Kate

--
Eric T. Ferguson,
van Reenenweg 3, 3702 SB ZEIST Netherlands
tel: +31 30-2673638

3-couple sets for 2-couple dances

Message 60689 · Patricia Ruggiero · 9 Apr 2011 03:15:26 · Top

Kate wrote:

> When
> I went to America on holiday and went to several classes and a party, I
> was told that you never do it that way in America.

Not true.

Pat
Charlottesville, Virginia
USA

3-couple sets for 2-couple dances...the term "double progression"

Message 60644 · Patricia Ruggiero · 8 Apr 2011 04:04:58 · Top

I've never heard it called anything at all.

Pat


> What then DO you call the circumstance which I have always called (as I
> learned from others hereabouts decades ago!)...and have ne'er heard
> called
> anything else..."double progression"?
>
> Robb

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