strathspey Archive: The Strathspey Reel

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The Strathspey Reel

Message 6021 · Lynn Messing · 8 Jan 1997 21:12:05 · Top

I very much like Deborah Shaw's idea of creating a list dance, and have
come up with my own modified reels as a figure to be fit into the
dance somewhere. I had thought it original, but Deborah thinks she
may have danced it once before. If this figure looks familiar to anyone,
please do let me know.

It's a modified crossover mirror reel of three. I've always enjoyed crossover
reels: the sense of flight the active couple has, the feeling of going from
apparent chaos into order, even the feeling of going from being the "outsider"
to being part of the figure. And last night, I asked myself, why should the
first couple be the only ones to have that fun? So here's my modification:
Start the crossover reels as normal, but then as second and third couples
each come up into first couples' position, they, too, crossover, so that the
firgure ends with the first three couples on the "wrong" sides of the dance.
(I'll leave it to the next devisor to put them back in place, rather than
hogging the extra 8 bars for another crossover reel).

BTW, This is also my first foray into the world of divising. It's nice to
have an opportunity to "dip my feet" into it. :)

Happy dancing, Lynn Messing messing@asel.udel.edu

The Strathspey Reel

Message 6022 · Mike Briggs · 8 Jan 1997 22:02:38 · Top

Lynn Messing wrote:
>
> I very much like Deborah Shaw's idea of creating a list dance, and > have come up with my own modified reels as a figure to be fit into the
> dance somewhere. I had thought it original, but Deborah thinks she
> may have danced it once before. If this figure looks familiar to > > anyone, please do let me know.
>
> It's a modified crossover mirror reel of three. I've always enjoyed > > crossover reels: the sense of flight the active couple has, the > feeling of going from apparent chaos into order, even the feeling of > going from being the "outsider" to being part of the figure. And last > night, I asked myself, why should the first couple be the only ones to > have that fun? So here's my modification:

> Start the crossover reels as normal, but then as second and third > couples each come up into first couples' position, they, too, > crossover, so that the figure ends with the first three couples on the > "wrong" sides of the dance.

> (I'll leave it to the next devisor to put them back in place, rather > than hogging the extra 8 bars for another crossover reel).
>
> BTW, This is also my first foray into the world of devising. It's nice > to have an opportunity to "dip my feet" into it. :)
>
> Happy dancing, Lynn Messing messing@asel.udel.edu

You're right, there are several dances which contain reels of three in
which all three couples cross at the top or at the bottom.

This dance, which I devised last year, is loosely based on a
recently-devised English country dance called The Responce [sic]. I
call it The Scottish Responce. As well as containing the
all-three-couples crossing feature, it's the only dance I know of with
Scottish styling in the "triplet" formation (there are many English
country dances so written or adapted from older sources, and numerous
dances in New England contradance styling written by the late Ted
Sannella and others).

THE SCOTTISH RESPONCE

1-8 1c CROSS, CAST (2c step up), CROSS, CAST (3c step up)
9-16 CROSSOVER REELS OF THREE, each couple down from the top in turn
(2c, 3c and 1c)
17-28 THREE-COUPLE RIGHTS AND LEFTS
29-32 All SET to partner and CROSS RH

The Strathspey Reel

Message 6024 · RSCDSSD · 8 Jan 1997 22:59:49 · Top

Lynn,

As you will no doubt hear from others as well, Hugh Thurston's Last of the
Lairds, Book 22 #5 has cross over reels where each couple crosses at the top
to opposite sides. I too like the feeling of the figure and wish it appeared
in more dances.

Regarding simultaneous diagonal reels of three - can anyone from the San
Francisco area remember the name of the danced devised by Russ King which
featured simultaneous diagonal reels of four and also made use of a brief
hands across when the dancers reached the center?

There may not much new under the "new dance figures" sun but it is still fun
to experiment.

Marjorie McLaughlin
RSCDS SD@aol.com
San Diego CA

The Strathspey Reel

Message 6026 · Lynn Messing · 8 Jan 1997 23:29:39 · Top

My thanks to all who have pointed out other dances which include the
modified crossover mirror reel that I had described earlier. While
I'm disappointed that it turned out not to be original (I don't recall
ever having danced it before, but perhaps I did do so, forgot about it,
and then dredged it up from my subconscious and claimed it as my own.),
I appreciate the responses and plan to look up "The Last of the Lairds"
when I get home tonight.

Well, back to the ol' drawing board...

cheers, Lynn Messing messing@asel.udel.edu

p.s., Mike or Norma Briggs, your dance looks like fun. How does your three
couple
rights & lefts differ from a three couple grand chain?

The Strathspey Reel

Message 6035 · SMiskoe · 9 Jan 1997 03:53:07 · Top

As everyone begins to think of their most exquisite and intriquit (sp) moves
to contribute, may I suggest, at the risk of being a Scrooge, a Grinch, a wet
blanket, let's create a dance that can be briefed in 30 seconds, can be
enjoyed by all levels and even could appear of a program.
Cheers,
Sylvia Miskoe, Concord, NH

The Strathspey Reel

Message 6042 · Ian Price · 9 Jan 1997 18:35:03 · Top

>As everyone begins to think of their most exquisite and intriquit (sp)
>moves
>to contribute, may I suggest, at the risk of being a Scrooge, a Grinch, a
>wet
>blanket, let's create a dance that can be briefed in 30 seconds, can be
>enjoyed by all levels and even could appear of a program.

Now there's an idea!
Thanks for the reality check.

-2chter

Double Digonal Reel

Message 6036 · Shengzhang Tang · 9 Jan 1997 06:49:04 · Top

There are several dances have the figure "double digonal reel of four
(using left hands across briefly in the center)." I can't recall most of
the names, but the "Angus MacLeod" (leaflet) and "Bonnie Lass O' Bon
Accord" (Bon Accord Book by Drewry) came into mind right away. In "Angus
MacLeod" (a Reel), the figure was done in 12 bars, while the "Bonnie Lass
O' Bon Accord" (a Strathspey) was done in 8 bars. Both are fun dances.
The figure is sure fun figure to dance, but does requires good phrasing.
Shengzhang Tang
tang@hscbklyn.edu

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