strathspey Archive: Footwork (was Transitions (was Circles))

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Footwork (was Transitions (was Circles))

Message 5612 · Martin Sheffield · 21 Nov 1996 14:17:43 · Top

Marjorie wrote:

>I accept that we have a difference of opinion regarding whether one can
> gracefully execute a step-close and still be dancing (I do believe it can be
>done). (...)
> Ours is most unusual in having the dancers up on the balls of the feet
>constantly while in motion.
> Stressing the achilles tendon and the calf muscles as we do has never seemed
>a very natural movement to me. Perhaps one cause of high frequency of foot
>and ligament injuries among SCDancers is the fact that our technique does not
>encourage, nor do we teach, people how to dance with greater flexibility in
>the ankle.

Well, what are we waiting for?

I beg to differ again. I think moving on the ball of the foot is perfectly
natural; our ancestors did plenty of running to hunt their food, and I
don't think they would have gotten far on their heels.
I also think that the injuries you mention come more from poor diet, some
slight deficiency can sometimes be enough to weaken our bodies. We all know
about water, salt, magnesium, calcium balance, but I'm sure all the other
elements in our food play a role, for good or bad.

Fortunatley, I have rarely had problems of this kind crop in in classes,
but I have noticed that those that complain of a tired back are the ones
that dirty their heels. The whole point of possessing a foot that pivots
vertically through some 90 degrees, is that it serves as a shock abssorber.
Up on your toes, with plenty of bounce, calves and tendons are doing the
work they are made for, protecting your spine from the effects of repeated
contact with a hard floor. Whenever a heel touches down bearing the weight
of the body, the shock wave goes right up to your brain.

>All older forms of country dancing from which SCD derives included walking,
>skipping and running steps in which the dancer alternated between being up on
>the ball of the foot and moving with the foot at times fully on the ground.
> This doesn't have to be ungraceful as one can see by watching an English
>Country dancer ...

OK, but in the walking (dancing) step, you put your heel to the floor
before transfer of weight, thereby avoiding a jarring to the rest of the
body. Surely the running and skipping steps are always done on the ball...?

> The standardized SCD steps which require all motion to occur on the ball of
>the foot is a 20th century development and, IMHO, has contributed to injury
>and difficulty in execution. Vigorous, challenging, fun to do, of course -
>but a price has been paid for some of these movements.

Don't say it too loudly, or we'll lose all our dancers!

Yours,

Martin,
Grenoble, France

Footwork (was Transitions (was Circles))

Message 5636 · Alan Paterson · 22 Nov 1996 10:25:52 · Top

Martin writes:

>I think moving on the ball of the foot is perfectly
>natural; our ancestors did plenty of running to hunt their food,
>and I don't think they would have gotten far on their heels.

Come off it Martin! Try running without putting your heel on the
ground. If they had done that, then our ancestors would more often
have been food themselves!

Alan

Footwork (was Transitions (was Circles))

Message 5657 · Martin Sheffield · 22 Nov 1996 23:32:27 · Top

Alan wrote:

>Come off it Martin! Try running without putting your heel on the
>ground. If they had done that, then our ancestors would more often
>have been food themselves!

When was the last time you ran for a bus, Alan? Bet you missed it!

I'll be watching your footwork next time we meet to see if you should be in
the over-60 7-&-close category.

My bad taste again, but none of us take these e-mails seriously, do we?

Tentative <g> and virtual bow.

Martin,
Grenoble, France

Footwork (was Transitions (was Circles))

Message 5676 · Alan Paterson · 23 Nov 1996 14:33:10 · Top

Martin got me again:

>Alan wrote:
>
>>Come off it Martin! Try running without putting your heel on the
>>ground. If they had done that, then our ancestors would more often
>>have been food themselves!
>
>When was the last time you ran for a bus, Alan? Bet you missed it!

True, true. When I wrote that I had in mind my own more leisurely jogging
style. However, I would still prefer to keep the logical concepts
"Scottish Country Dancing" and "Running for a Bus" in distinct
compartments.

>
>I'll be watching your footwork next time we meet to see if you should be
>in the over-60 7-&-close category.

Hmm. I can tell you now that I DO do 7-&-close, despite being only
over-40. (I don't put my heels on the ground though!).

>My bad taste again, but none of us take these e-mails seriously, do we?

Not ones like these anyway :-)

Alan

Lets get serious (was Footwork (was Transitions (was Circles)))

Message 5679 · Trans Vector Technologies, Inc · 23 Nov 1996 18:55:40 · Top

Martin Sheffield writes:

>but none of us take these e-mails seriously, do we?

My considered opinion is that it depends on who is writing. I have learned
that it is very difficult to take Martin's notes seriously. However, for
those from Kim McGarrity, I must search the subtlety for two or three
levels of hidden meaning. I expect my difficulties will be further
compounded when she finally comes out of the closet.

Oberdan.

P.S. I know the one for smiling :-), but what is the email symbol for
"tongue firmly planted in cheek"?

Trans Vector Technologies, Inc, 184 Estaban Drive, Camarillo, CA 93010-1611
Phone: (805)484-2775, FAX: (805)484-2718, EMail: ootto@tvt.com

Lets get serious (was Footwork (was Transitions (was Circles)))

Message 5683 · FarMcTrav · 23 Nov 1996 20:33:16 · Top

In a message dated 96-11-23 11:59:57 EST, you write:

Oberdan wrote:
<< P.S. I know the one for smiling :-), but what is the email symbol for
"tongue firmly planted in cheek"? >>

Oberdan, I don't know the answer to that one, but here's one I learned that
_might_ come in useful: LOL = Laugh Out Loud

Ken McFarland

Lets get serious (was Footwork (was Transitions (was Circles)))

Message 5687 · ReelLass · 24 Nov 1996 03:51:52 · Top

>>Oberdan.
P.S. I know the one for smiling :-), but what is the email symbol for
"tongue firmly planted in cheek"?
>>

Extracted from the unofficial "emoticon" dictionary:

;-) This is a "winkie" which connotes teasing

:-( This is a frownie for indicating unhappiness or disapproval

:-p This is for sticking your tongue out at someone

>:-> This is a sharpie, for those devilish remarks

>;-> This is a winking sharpie, for when you really don't mean it.

:-} This is a wry or sick smile

:-? AND, DA DA! This is your tongue, firmly planted in your cheek!

HTH

~~~ & :o)

(waving and smiling at you)

Terry Barron
San Jose, CA
|

Lets get serious (was Footwork (was Transitions (was Circles)))

Message 5692 · Armin Busse · 25 Nov 1996 13:11:55 · Top

Perhaps we ought to invent an gigglicon for "tongue planted firmly in
check". How about %-? for an example?

I, too, am waiting for Kim to come out of the closet (sans shoes). If
she fiddles with her feet half as good as she does with her other limbs,
I'd buy a ticket to THAT event! (and fly halfway round the world to
attend).
In the mean time, happy dancing Kim.
And happy dancing to all,
Coletta

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