strathspey Archive: Wedding music (not dancing)

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Wedding music (not dancing)

Message 5475 · David=Knight%ADMIN%COL · 12 Nov 1996 22:54:47 · Top

A band I am in has been asked to play for a wedding. Neither the bride nor
the groom are Scottish Country Dancers. However, they love traditional
Scottish/Irish music.

I am wondering if anyone can point me towards good tunes traditionally
associated with/played at weddings/receptions. Are there any specifically
musical (as opposed to dancing) traditions in this regard? I have heard of
wedding reels, but am woefully ignorant. I'd also be interested in tune
sources, as well as an explanation of how the tune fits into the tradition.

As this is off-topic, please feel free to e-mail me directly at
<daknight@switch.com>.

Thanks in advance,

David Knight
Columbia, SC, USA
<daknight@switch.com>

Please don't open any attachments, as they are inadvertent.

Wedding music (not dancing)

Message 5476 · Susan Worland · 12 Nov 1996 23:03:19 · Top

At 01:11 PM 10/23/96 EDT, daknight wrote:
>A band I am in has been asked to play for a wedding. Neither the bride nor
>the groom are Scottish Country Dancers. However, they love traditional
>Scottish/Irish music.
>
It may be off topic ever so slightly, but I'd be curious to hear what you
find out! I've many times been asked to play at weddings where someone
heard of me because I play for Scottish dancing, but that's not particularly
what they wanted at their wedding. Usually they've known what they wanted,
though -- Celtic background music, something to make the grandparents cry, a
few easy dances to be taught to the guests. It sounds like your couple
wants something different, though, and I'd be interested to hear more!

*************************************************************
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Wedding music (not dancing)

Message 5477 · John Ward · 13 Nov 1996 03:47:49 · Top

>A band I am in has been asked to play for a wedding. Neither the bride nor
>the groom are Scottish Country Dancers. However, they love traditional
>Scottish/Irish music.
>
>I am wondering if anyone can point me towards good tunes traditionally
>associated with/played at weddings/receptions. Are there any specifically
>musical (as opposed to dancing) traditions in this regard? I have heard of
>wedding reels, but am woefully ignorant. I'd also be interested in tune
>sources, as well as an explanation of how the tune fits into the tradition.
>
>
>As this is off-topic, please feel free to e-mail me directly at
><daknight@switch.com>.
>
>Thanks in advance,
>
>David Knight

David,

There are a couple of tunes and tradition items for starters. In the
Shetland Islands, it is traditional for a fiddler to lead the bridal
party to the church, often accompanied by a person shooting off a rifle
or shotgun at periodic intervals, probably to gather attention, but I'm
sure there is a more folksy explaination. One tune from that tradition
is the Shetland Bridal March, sometimes known as the Unst Bridal March.
The tune is fairly well known and can be found in a variety of tune
books. It is even in the fiddler's fakebook, but that source messes up
the rhythm, IMHO, by putting in some 4/4 measures where the original
simply has a hold in a 3/4 measure. The tune is a moderate 3/4 march and
can be used as a processional.

In a similar vein, there is the St. Kilda's Wedding tune, which can be
found as a march, strathspey and reel (take your pick!). This could be
used in a processional or recessional.

Finally, there is Mairi's Wedding, which is a reel, and which is
sometimes used as a recessional.

There are a lot of good tunes for use in a ceremony, as the Scottish
reperatoire contains soo many good slow tunes. Most good Scottish
tunebooks should contain at least a couple you could use in a wedding.

Sources you might want to look into are the tunebooks by Tom Anderson -
"Hand Me Doon Da Fiddle", "Ringing Strings" and "Gie Me an A"; The Simon
Fraser Collection; The Skye Collection; and the "Ceol na Fidhle" series
from Harpstrings House in Scotland, which are a series of 4 tunebooks
recently compiled in Scotland, but mostly of traditional tunes.

Hope this helps.

John

Wedding music (not dancing)

Message 5491 · Terry Traub · 14 Nov 1996 16:12:05 · Top

How about these tunes:
There Came a Young Man
Kiss Me Quick, My Mother's Coming
I Married Your Daughter (or is it You Married My Daughter?)
Haste to the Wedding
Put Me in a Box

Wedding music (not dancing)

Message 5497 · Terry Traub · 14 Nov 1996 20:59:20 · Top

Oh, yeah--almost forgot this one:
My Wife Is a Wee Wanton Thing (jig)

Wedding music (not dancing)

Message 5507 · SMiskoe · 15 Nov 1996 14:59:00 · Top

Terry is not sure of the correct title for one of his suggestions - I Married
Your Daughter (or is it You Married My Daughter?) It is: You married my
daughter but yet you didn't. A great Quebecois tune.
Cheers,
Sylvia Miskoe, Concord, NH

Wedding music (not dancing)

Message 5529 · Jack Campin · 16 Nov 1996 04:30:37 · Top

Terry Traub <ttraub@world.std.com> wrote:
> How about these tunes:
> There Came a Young Man
> Kiss Me Quick, My Mother's Coming
> I Married Your Daughter (or is it You Married My Daughter?)
> Haste to the Wedding
> Put Me in a Box

Is the last one the same as "Put me in the Big Chest"? Any idea what the
title is alluding to?

Others (in Kerr's):
Marry Me Now
Huntley's Wedding
John Bain's Sister's Wedding
The Groom in his Shirt

Or the Unst Bridal March, in Tom Anderson's "Haand Me Doon da Fiddle".

I've heard a lot of nice Norwegian wedding marches over the years but
never seen any in print. Anyone know where you can find them outside
Norway?

Prime nomination for Tunes to Get Divorced By: "Whistle o'er the Lave O't".

----------------------------------------------------------------------------
jack@purr.demon.co.uk - Jack Campin, 2 Haddington Place, Edinburgh EH7 4AE

Wedding music (not dancing)

Message 5532 · Tappan · 16 Nov 1996 19:47:18 · Top

Re wedding tunes:
>> Put Me in a Box
>
>Is the last one the same as "Put me in the Big Chest"? Any idea what the
>title is alluding to?
>
I'd heard both names for the same (excellent) tune. I'd also heard that it
referred to being put in a coffin. Don't know how true that is. We play it
here in LA as the 3rd tune in a set we call Cape Breton Wedding Reels which
I think we got from Kate Dunlay's excellent book years ago (now reprinted
and expanded), or possibly from Buddy MacMaster. I've seen an article
somewhere on the wedding reels that said (more or less) that they may have
been used years ago if someone wanted to be married in Cape Breton, but
circumstances (like winter weather) prevented the priest from getting to
them to perform the ceremony - they'd do the dance instead and do the
ceremony with priest later. I may not be remembering this totally
correctly. Surely there is someone out there who knows more about this than
I do.

Other tunes I've used at weddings that haven't been mentioned: Troy's
Wedding (a joyful pipe jig), and Highland Cathedral - this is a pipe air
which works really well for a processional.

Jan Tappan
Fiddlers Crossing

Wedding music (not dancing)

Message 5546 · Courtney Cartwright · 18 Nov 1996 19:49:17 · Top

>Jack Campin wrote:
>I've heard a lot of nice Norwegian wedding marches over the years but
>never seen any in print. Anyone know where you can find them outside
>Norway?
>

As most Scandinavian fiddlers learn tunes by ear at the gatherings, I'm not
sure how much of this music gets written down... There are dozens, at
least, of bridal marches with a lot of variations from the local areas.
It's quite a nice tradition, and I know that sometimes tunes are written
especially for the occassion. So you often may see Bride's March from
Telemark, or Kirsten Lagensdottir's Bride March, or even named after the
Devisor of the tune, i.e.
Bride March after Olle Peers... Most of the Scandinavian fiddlers I know in
the USA get their tunes off of recordings -- sort of a gathering by remote
control.

--
Courtney Cartwright
Tucson, Arizona
ccartwri@primenet.com

Wedding music (not dancing)

Message 5549 · Bryan McAlister · 18 Nov 1996 20:44:54 · Top

How about Scot Skinner's "Brides Reel"

In message <v02130502aeb3ac554a58@[153.34.82.236]>, Tappan
<tappan@netcom.com> writes
>Re wedding tunes:
>>> Put Me in a Box
>>
>>Is the last one the same as "Put me in the Big Chest"? Any idea what the
>>title is alluding to?
>>
>I'd heard both names for the same (excellent) tune. I'd also heard that it
>referred to being put in a coffin. Don't know how true that is. We play it
>here in LA as the 3rd tune in a set we call Cape Breton Wedding Reels which
>I think we got from Kate Dunlay's excellent book years ago (now reprinted
>and expanded), or possibly from Buddy MacMaster. I've seen an article
>somewhere on the wedding reels that said (more or less) that they may have
>been used years ago if someone wanted to be married in Cape Breton, but
>circumstances (like winter weather) prevented the priest from getting to
>them to perform the ceremony - they'd do the dance instead and do the
>ceremony with priest later. I may not be remembering this totally
>correctly. Surely there is someone out there who knows more about this than
>I do.
>
>Other tunes I've used at weddings that haven't been mentioned: Troy's
>Wedding (a joyful pipe jig), and Highland Cathedral - this is a pipe air
>which works really well for a processional.
>
>Jan Tappan
>Fiddlers Crossing
>
>
>--
>Tappan <tappan@netcom.com>
>

Bryan McAlister

email: bryan@bryanmac.demon.co.uk

Wedding music (not dancing)

Message 5588 · David=Knight%ADMIN%COL · 20 Nov 1996 19:17:58 · Top

Thanks to everyone who sent me information on traditional music for
weddings. I think most of the information was posted directly to
Strathspey, but I did receive a request to share whatever I found out. The
following is a list of the suggestions sent to me directly:

1) Cape Breton Wedding Reels: Old Time Wedding Reel #1: John of Badenyon;
Old Time Wedding Reel #2: Hamish the Carpenter; (Put Me in the Big Chest
often follows). This set would traditionally have been the first dance
after the ceremony, but could also be used to marry a couple if there was
no member of the clergy yet living in the area--back when Cape Breton was
sparsely settled. These tunes can be found in "Traditional Celtic Violin
Music of Cape Breton, the DunGreen Collection" and on Joe Cormier's "Old
Time Wedding Reels" (Rounder).
2) The Lass I Adore (a slow air with a Gaelic title, played on bagpipe)
3) Mairi's Wedding, aka Lewis Wedding Song (both instrumental and vocal
versions possible).
4) Regular SCD sets, beginning with waltzes, and working up to jigs and
reels, with special attention to the campy tunes such as Bonnie Dundee,
Scotland the Brave, and 100 Pipers.
5) A medley of tunes with love themes, such as: Will ye go, Lassie, Go?, My
Love She's but a lassie yet, The White Cockade, The Eriskay Love Lilt, and
Corn Riggs

Finally, it was brought to my attention that some churches do not allow
certain kinds of music in the church itself, and it was recommended that I
ask the official conducting the wedding about limitations.

Marry me now,

David Knight
Columbia, SC, USA
<daknight@switch.com>

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