strathspey Archive: Dumbing down demos (was choosing demo dances)

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Dumbing down demos (was choosing demo dances)

Message 52680 · Diane Jensen Donald · 4 Jun 2008 19:24:42 · Top

James,

As usual I agree with you. It's challenging for me to demo for non-dancers
sometimes because I want to show off every bit of my know-how. However,
usually what this seems to do is intimidate non-dancers who might be
inclined to try it. It was lovely when I was in Scotland and was able to do
a few demos for other dancers and really let 'er rip. That said, I think it
would be pretty tough to keep reels out of a dem.

Diane
Boise, Idaho

P.S. How can a young energetic dance enthusiast like you not enjoy Shiftin'
Bobbins?

On 6/2/08, James Mungall <jeb_mungall@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
> Well whether fortunately or unfortunately reels are a basis of SCD. I'm
> not one that supports avoiding reels for demos. I agree that they might be
> harder to catch/comprehend for the average spectator--but we shouldn't
> "dumb-down" our selections either. Reels are too much a part of SCD to
> avoid them for demos entirely (in my opinion anyway.) I understand the
> symmetry that's attractive to the human eye... Posties is great and Shiftin'
> Bobbins (though I really dislike dancing it) is also visually
> interesting. I'm all for picking visually attractive dances for demos but I
> don't like to disclude reel-based dances.
>
> James Mungall
> Baton Rouge, LA, USA
>
>
> --- On Mon, 6/2/08, Martin Sheffield <mj.sheffield@orange.fr> wrote:
>
> > From: Martin Sheffield <mj.sheffield@orange.fr>
> > Subject: Choosing demo dances (Was: dances for 3 cpl sets?)
> > To: jeb_mungall@yahoo.com, "SCD news and discussion" <
> strathspey@strathspey.org>
> > Date: Monday, June 2, 2008, 12:36 PM
> > Le 2 juin 08 à 17:28, James Mungall a écrit :
> >
> > > I'll second Wendy's suggestion of Flight of
> > the Falcon.
> >
> > For a public performance?
> > I'd say that reels of three are among the least
> > readable/
> > understandable figures for the layman. And while a falcon
> > reel well
> > executed can be very elegant, I imagine that it must be
> > even less
> > clear for the average spectator. Straight lines, circles,
> > triangles
> > are easy on the eye. Promenades, poussettes &
> > allemandes should be
> > worth watching. Turns (RH/LH or 2H) are fine. Reels,
> > however,
> > especially when not symmetrical, are a different matter.
> > Just think
> > how long it takes a beginner dancer to undersand the logic
> > of a reel,
> > in spite of regular practicing. The spectator sees a reel
> > once or
> > twice and wonders what on earth we are doing.
> >
> > Although it is not our main purpose in life, our club was
> > asked to
> > put on a little show the other day.
> > We did Shifting Bobbins and Postie's Jig, for their
> > symmetry;
> > Wind on Loch, since the timing of the interlocked reels
> > allows an
> > in&out movement for the whole set, easier to understand
> > than an
> > ordinart reel;
> > Piper & Penguin, for a different formation, with
> > understandable
> > patterns;
> > Johnnie Walker, likewise, plus the change of tempo to wake
> > up the
> > audience;
> > St Martin's Cross, for straight lines symmetry and
> > movement.
> > Midnight Toil, a 5-cp set (but works as a 3-cp), with the
> > two active
> > couples echoing each other (covering) .
> >
> > Sorry, these are not what Monica originally asked for, but
> > I think it
> > is wise to consider which dances are worth watching and
> > why.
> > I did not mention the real reason for choosing the above.
> > Our dancers
> > know them well enough to be relaxed and look as if they are
> > enjoying
> > the activity. The non-specialist spectator does not care a
> > damn
> > whether our feet are pointing correctly or whether our
> > hands are the
> > correct height from the floor. But he can see whether we
> > are enjoying
> > ourselves or not, and that is what counts.
> >
> > Martin
>
>
>
>

Dumbing down demos (was choosing demo dances)

Message 52682 · Pia Walker · 4 Jun 2008 20:05:36 · Top

It all depends on what the dem/performance is for - both with regards to the
audience but also why the dem/performance is there - what do you like to
see? As a dancer - going through a dance 8 times fine, but looking at
it???? Yawn - you have to entertain, you have to have a little humour in
it, you have to have a bit of Wow. And you have to have the audience
wanting more. So a dance where you can thrown those looks to each other,
where there are unexpected changes of directions which gives the feeling of
collision is imminent - but phew they didn't. But first and foremost it has
to be polished - why change your repertoire everytime you go out to dem?
The people in the audience don't know the dance - and if you know it to
death - it means, hopefully, that you won't be making many mistakes, and
that you look confident and can concentrate on the 'acting' part.

I like the Penguin and the Piper / and Moulin Rouge - plenty of scope for
come-hither and all the rest :>) Square sets, so the audience get to see
something from all directions. Triangular sets are the same - you don't
get a row of back sides:>)

Pia

-----Original Message-----
From: strathspey-bounces-pia=intamail.com@strathspey.org
[mailto:strathspey-bounces-pia=intamail.com@strathspey.org]On Behalf Of
Diane Jensen Donald
Sent: 04 June 2008 18:25
To: jeb_mungall@yahoo.com; SCD news and discussion
Subject: Dumbing down demos (was choosing demo dances)

James,

As usual I agree with you. It's challenging for me to demo for non-dancers
sometimes because I want to show off every bit of my know-how. However,
usually what this seems to do is intimidate non-dancers who might be
inclined to try it. It was lovely when I was in Scotland and was able to do
a few demos for other dancers and really let 'er rip. That said, I think it
would be pretty tough to keep reels out of a dem.

Diane
Boise, Idaho

P.S. How can a young energetic dance enthusiast like you not enjoy Shiftin'
Bobbins?

On 6/2/08, James Mungall <jeb_mungall@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
> Well whether fortunately or unfortunately reels are a basis of SCD. I'm
> not one that supports avoiding reels for demos. I agree that they might
be
> harder to catch/comprehend for the average spectator--but we shouldn't
> "dumb-down" our selections either. Reels are too much a part of SCD to
> avoid them for demos entirely (in my opinion anyway.) I understand the
> symmetry that's attractive to the human eye... Posties is great and
Shiftin'
> Bobbins (though I really dislike dancing it) is also visually
> interesting. I'm all for picking visually attractive dances for demos but
I
> don't like to disclude reel-based dances.
>
> James Mungall
> Baton Rouge, LA, USA
>
>
> --- On Mon, 6/2/08, Martin Sheffield <mj.sheffield@orange.fr> wrote:
>
> > From: Martin Sheffield <mj.sheffield@orange.fr>
> > Subject: Choosing demo dances (Was: dances for 3 cpl sets?)
> > To: jeb_mungall@yahoo.com, "SCD news and discussion" <
> strathspey@strathspey.org>
> > Date: Monday, June 2, 2008, 12:36 PM
> > Le 2 juin 08 à 17:28, James Mungall a écrit :
> >
> > > I'll second Wendy's suggestion of Flight of
> > the Falcon.
> >
> > For a public performance?
> > I'd say that reels of three are among the least
> > readable/
> > understandable figures for the layman. And while a falcon
> > reel well
> > executed can be very elegant, I imagine that it must be
> > even less
> > clear for the average spectator. Straight lines, circles,
> > triangles
> > are easy on the eye. Promenades, poussettes &
> > allemandes should be
> > worth watching. Turns (RH/LH or 2H) are fine. Reels,
> > however,
> > especially when not symmetrical, are a different matter.
> > Just think
> > how long it takes a beginner dancer to undersand the logic
> > of a reel,
> > in spite of regular practicing. The spectator sees a reel
> > once or
> > twice and wonders what on earth we are doing.
> >
> > Although it is not our main purpose in life, our club was
> > asked to
> > put on a little show the other day.
> > We did Shifting Bobbins and Postie's Jig, for their
> > symmetry;
> > Wind on Loch, since the timing of the interlocked reels
> > allows an
> > in&out movement for the whole set, easier to understand
> > than an
> > ordinart reel;
> > Piper & Penguin, for a different formation, with
> > understandable
> > patterns;
> > Johnnie Walker, likewise, plus the change of tempo to wake
> > up the
> > audience;
> > St Martin's Cross, for straight lines symmetry and
> > movement.
> > Midnight Toil, a 5-cp set (but works as a 3-cp), with the
> > two active
> > couples echoing each other (covering) .
> >
> > Sorry, these are not what Monica originally asked for, but
> > I think it
> > is wise to consider which dances are worth watching and
> > why.
> > I did not mention the real reason for choosing the above.
> > Our dancers
> > know them well enough to be relaxed and look as if they are
> > enjoying
> > the activity. The non-specialist spectator does not care a
> > damn
> > whether our feet are pointing correctly or whether our
> > hands are the
> > correct height from the floor. But he can see whether we
> > are enjoying
> > ourselves or not, and that is what counts.
> >
> > Martin
>
>
>
>

Dumbing down demos (was choosing demo dances)

Message 52685 · Walter Ligon · 4 Jun 2008 22:57:30 · Top

We have the music for The De'il Amang the Sailors, which is a 3 couple
set dance. It begins with the De'il amang the Tailors, then shifts into
jig time with Hooper's Jig & returns to reel time with The Sailor. All
of these are not difficult. I have modified the transitions to be easier
than in the original instructions in Dances with a Difference. On bars
17-24 of The De'il the first couple dances the allemande with the third
couple to finish 2, 3, 1, In Hooper's Jig the transition is first &
third couples dance half rights & lefts, set, then cross back to own
sides to again finish 2, 3, 1.
Thus all familiar dances, good music, constantly changing figures and a
three couple set.

Happy dancing,
Walt Ligon, Marietta, GA (Atlanta Branch)

-----Original Message-----
From: strathspey-bounces-wligonmd=bellsouth.net@strathspey.org
[mailto:strathspey-bounces-wligonmd=bellsouth.net@strathspey.org] On
Behalf Of Pia
Sent: Wednesday, June 04, 2008 2:06 PM
To: SCD news and discussion
Subject: RE: Dumbing down demos (was choosing demo dances)

It all depends on what the dem/performance is for - both with regards to
the audience but also why the dem/performance is there - what do you
like to see? As a dancer - going through a dance 8 times fine, but
looking at it???? Yawn - you have to entertain, you have to have a
little humour in it, you have to have a bit of Wow. And you have to
have the audience wanting more. So a dance where you can thrown those
looks to each other, where there are unexpected changes of directions
which gives the feeling of collision is imminent - but phew they didn't.
But first and foremost it has to be polished - why change your
repertoire everytime you go out to dem? The people in the audience don't
know the dance - and if you know it to death - it means, hopefully, that
you won't be making many mistakes, and that you look confident and can
concentrate on the 'acting' part.

I like the Penguin and the Piper / and Moulin Rouge - plenty of scope
for come-hither and all the rest :>) Square sets, so the audience get
to see
something from all directions. Triangular sets are the same - you
don't
get a row of back sides:>)

Pia

-----Original Message-----
From: strathspey-bounces-pia=intamail.com@strathspey.org
[mailto:strathspey-bounces-pia=intamail.com@strathspey.org]On Behalf Of
Diane Jensen Donald
Sent: 04 June 2008 18:25
To: jeb_mungall@yahoo.com; SCD news and discussion
Subject: Dumbing down demos (was choosing demo dances)

James,

As usual I agree with you. It's challenging for me to demo for
non-dancers sometimes because I want to show off every bit of my
know-how. However, usually what this seems to do is intimidate
non-dancers who might be inclined to try it. It was lovely when I was
in Scotland and was able to do a few demos for other dancers and really
let 'er rip. That said, I think it would be pretty tough to keep reels
out of a dem.

Diane
Boise, Idaho

P.S. How can a young energetic dance enthusiast like you not enjoy
Shiftin' Bobbins?

On 6/2/08, James Mungall <jeb_mungall@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
> Well whether fortunately or unfortunately reels are a basis of SCD.
> I'm not one that supports avoiding reels for demos. I agree that they

> might
be
> harder to catch/comprehend for the average spectator--but we shouldn't

> "dumb-down" our selections either. Reels are too much a part of SCD
> to avoid them for demos entirely (in my opinion anyway.) I understand

> the symmetry that's attractive to the human eye... Posties is great
> and
Shiftin'
> Bobbins (though I really dislike dancing it) is also visually
> interesting. I'm all for picking visually attractive dances for demos

> but
I
> don't like to disclude reel-based dances.
>
> James Mungall
> Baton Rouge, LA, USA
>
>
> --- On Mon, 6/2/08, Martin Sheffield <mj.sheffield@orange.fr> wrote:
>
> > From: Martin Sheffield <mj.sheffield@orange.fr>
> > Subject: Choosing demo dances (Was: dances for 3 cpl sets?)
> > To: jeb_mungall@yahoo.com, "SCD news and discussion" <
> strathspey@strathspey.org>
> > Date: Monday, June 2, 2008, 12:36 PM
> > Le 2 juin 08 à 17:28, James Mungall a écrit :
> >
> > > I'll second Wendy's suggestion of Flight of
> > the Falcon.
> >
> > For a public performance?
> > I'd say that reels of three are among the least
> > readable/
> > understandable figures for the layman. And while a falcon reel well
> > executed can be very elegant, I imagine that it must be
> > even less
> > clear for the average spectator. Straight lines, circles,
> > triangles
> > are easy on the eye. Promenades, poussettes &
> > allemandes should be
> > worth watching. Turns (RH/LH or 2H) are fine. Reels,
> > however,
> > especially when not symmetrical, are a different matter.
> > Just think
> > how long it takes a beginner dancer to undersand the logic
> > of a reel,
> > in spite of regular practicing. The spectator sees a reel
> > once or
> > twice and wonders what on earth we are doing.
> >
> > Although it is not our main purpose in life, our club was asked to
> > put on a little show the other day.
> > We did Shifting Bobbins and Postie's Jig, for their
> > symmetry;
> > Wind on Loch, since the timing of the interlocked reels
> > allows an
> > in&out movement for the whole set, easier to understand
> > than an
> > ordinart reel;
> > Piper & Penguin, for a different formation, with
> > understandable
> > patterns;
> > Johnnie Walker, likewise, plus the change of tempo to wake
> > up the
> > audience;
> > St Martin's Cross, for straight lines symmetry and
> > movement.
> > Midnight Toil, a 5-cp set (but works as a 3-cp), with the
> > two active
> > couples echoing each other (covering) .
> >
> > Sorry, these are not what Monica originally asked for, but I think
> > it is wise to consider which dances are worth watching and
> > why.
> > I did not mention the real reason for choosing the above.
> > Our dancers
> > know them well enough to be relaxed and look as if they are
> > enjoying
> > the activity. The non-specialist spectator does not care a
> > damn
> > whether our feet are pointing correctly or whether our
> > hands are the
> > correct height from the floor. But he can see whether we
> > are enjoying
> > ourselves or not, and that is what counts.
> >
> > Martin
>
>
>
>

Dumbing down demos (was choosing demo dances)

Message 52690 · ron.mackey · 5 Jun 2008 02:43:02 · Top

Diane
Boise, Idaho

P.S. How can a young energetic dance enthusiast like you not enjoy Shiftin'
Bobbins?

Speaking as an old nit-picky enthusiast -
Possibly because it is so often badly done. It's usually the timing
that gets shot and threes do not turn back on bar 4 so the second wheels are
all over the place! Where I usually see it dance it is a shambles.
Happy Dancing :)

Ron

Ron Mackey
RSCDS London, Croydon & International Branches

Dumbing down demos (was choosing demo dances)

Message 52700 · Martin Sheffield · 5 Jun 2008 12:14:38 · Top

Le 5 juin 08 à 02:43, Ron Mackey a écrit :

> ... not enjoy Shiftin' Bobbins?
>
> Speaking as an old nit-picky enthusiast -
> Possibly because it is so often badly done.

Yes indeed!
Sh B is fun to do or to watch only with perfect timing.

I had a note from the southern hemisphere recently expressing
surprise that we, here in the north, zigzagged down and back in Sh
B. As it happens, this is not my way of doing it at all. The couple
in question had danced with us here last year, when there were a
score of dancers from the north of England taking part; is it a
practice particular among the Geordies? is it usual anywhere else?
or is it simply the result of dancing in halls that are too short to
allow flight down the middle and back?

Martin

Dumbing down demos (was choosing demo dances)

Message 52706 · elissa h · 5 Jun 2008 13:34:17 · Top

We don't do it that way in my area, but I have been to a weekend in
Ontario, Canada and they did it that way there.

Elissa Hock
Akron, OH

On Jun 5, 2008, at 6:14 AM, Martin Sheffield wrote:

>
> Le 5 juin 08 à 02:43, Ron Mackey a écrit :
>
>> ... not enjoy Shiftin' Bobbins?
>>
>> Speaking as an old nit-picky enthusiast -
>> Possibly because it is so often badly done.
>
> Yes indeed!
> Sh B is fun to do or to watch only with perfect timing.
>
> I had a note from the southern hemisphere recently expressing
> surprise that we, here in the north, zigzagged down and back in Sh
> B. As it happens, this is not my way of doing it at all. The
> couple in question had danced with us here last year, when there
> were a score of dancers from the north of England taking part; is
> it a practice particular among the Geordies? is it usual anywhere
> else? or is it simply the result of dancing in halls that are too
> short to allow flight down the middle and back?
>
> Martin
>
>
>
>

Dumbing down demos (was choosing demo dances)

Message 52707 · Agnes MacMichael · 5 Jun 2008 14:01:10 · Top

My understanding of the weaving down the middle and up was that this was the
bobbins?
Agnes

On 05/06/2008, Martin Sheffield <mj.sheffield@orange.fr> wrote:
>
>
> Le 5 juin 08 à 02:43, Ron Mackey a écrit :
>
> ... not enjoy Shiftin' Bobbins?
>>
>> Speaking as an old nit-picky enthusiast -
>> Possibly because it is so often badly done.
>>
>
> Yes indeed!
> Sh B is fun to do or to watch only with perfect timing.
>
> I had a note from the southern hemisphere recently expressing surprise that
> we, here in the north, zigzagged down and back in Sh B. As it happens, this
> is not my way of doing it at all. The couple in question had danced with us
> here last year, when there were a score of dancers from the north of England
> taking part; is it a practice particular among the Geordies? is it usual
> anywhere else? or is it simply the result of dancing in halls that are too
> short to allow flight down the middle and back?
>
> Martin
>
>
>
>
>

Dumbing down demos (was choosing demo dances)

Message 52711 · Martin Sheffield · 5 Jun 2008 14:41:42 · Top

Le 5 juin 08 à 14:01, Agnes Macmichael a écrit :

>
> My understanding of the weaving down the middle and up was that
> this was the
> bobbins?

Do bobbins not go round & round?

Martin
>

Dumbing down demos (was choosing demo dances)

Message 52713 · Pia Walker · 5 Jun 2008 14:48:38 · Top

Not in a weaving machine/loom - they go from side to side

Pia

-----Original Message-----
From: strathspey-bounces-pia=intamail.com@strathspey.org
[mailto:strathspey-bounces-pia=intamail.com@strathspey.org]On Behalf Of
Martin Sheffield
Sent: 05 June 2008 13:42
To: SCD news and discussion
Subject: Re: Dumbing down demos (was choosing demo dances)

Le 5 juin 08 à 14:01, Agnes Macmichael a écrit :

>
> My understanding of the weaving down the middle and up was that
> this was the
> bobbins?

Do bobbins not go round & round?

Martin
>

Dumbing down demos (was choosing demo dances)

Message 52715 · Martin Sheffield · 5 Jun 2008 14:59:39 · Top

Le 5 juin 08 à 14:48, Pia a écrit :

> Not in a weaving machine/loom - they go from side to side

>
I thought that was a shuttle ... no?

Martin

Dumbing down demos (was choosing demo dances)

Message 52717 · Fiona Kopeny · 5 Jun 2008 15:14:13 · Top

The boat thing in weaving is the shuttle, yes, but the actual thing that
holds the thread that goes in the shuttle is indeed called a bobbin.

That having been said, I always pictured sewing machine bobbins.

The zigzag down and up...having grown up dancing in Toronto (until last
year), I can confirm that there will be the odd couple that does the zigzag
thing there (not me, unless my partner starts it), but it's certainly not
the standard. I have always assumed that it was just to make the dance more
interesting and had nothing at all to do with the bobbins.

Fiona
...dream amateur weaver...

On Thu, Jun 5, 2008 at 7:59 AM, Martin Sheffield <mj.sheffield@orange.fr>
wrote:

>
> Le 5 juin 08 à 14:48, Pia a écrit :
>
> Not in a weaving machine/loom - they go from side to side
>>
>
>
>> I thought that was a shuttle ... no?
>
> Martin
>

--
_________________________________________________________________
Fiona Kopeny, Import Facilitator
Seybold International Corp.

"There are three kinds of people in the world,
those who can count and those who can't."

View Alexander's website --> http://www.babiesonline.com/babies/a/alexj
View Robyn's website --> http://www.babiesonline.com/babies/r/robynk

Dumbing down demos (was choosing demo dances)

Message 52727 · ron.mackey · 5 Jun 2008 23:59:19 · Top

> Not in a weaving machine/loom - they go from side to side
>
> Pia
>

But it is not a weaving machine!! This is lacemaking we're talking
about.
Jenny Bradley comes from the Nottingham area, - you know, Nottingham Lace?
Happy Dancing :)

Ron

Ron Mackey
RSCDS London, Croydon & International Branches

Dumbing down demos (was choosing demo dances)

Message 52732 · Anselm Lingnau · 6 Jun 2008 00:40:05 · Top

Ron Mackey wrote:

> Jenny Bradley comes from the Nottingham area, - you know, Nottingham Lace?

Yep, but we're talking Shiftin' Bobbins here. Shiftin' Bobbins is by Roy
Clowes and (I'm told) depicts the Dundee jute mills.

Jute (the second-most commercially important cloth fibre, after cotton) is the
raw material for Hessian cloth (burlap), sacking and other fabrics, comes
mainly from India and Bangladesh, and in the UK used to be processed mainly
in Dundee up until the 1970s or so, when it was mostly pushed out of the
market by synthetics. It is now regaining commercial interest because it is
100% biodegradable. Being a fairly coarse type of fibre it is, however, not
useful for making Nottingham lace!

Hessian cloth is definitely a woven fabric and hence would be produced on a
loom. This gives us, IMHO, the hands-across as the bobbins (reels) containing
the unwoven jute fibres and the down-the-middle-and-up as the movement of the
shuttle.

Anselm
--
Anselm Lingnau, Friedberg, Germany ..................... anselm@strathspey.org
I wonder if other dogs think poodles are members of a weird religious cult.
-- Rita Rudner

Dumbing down demos (was choosing demo dances)

Message 52735 · Sheila Kidney · 6 Jun 2008 01:18:34 · Top

As a Dundonian, tho I never worked in the mills, I would add that the
shifters were the ones who kept the weavers supplied with bobbins ie
bringing full bobbins and taking away empty ones, so the
down-the -middle-and-up could signify that.

Sheila Kidney
----- Original Message -----
From: "Anselm Lingnau" <anselm@strathspey.org>
To: "SCD news and discussion" <strathspey@strathspey.org>
Sent: Thursday, June 05, 2008 11:40 PM
Subject: Re: Dumbing down demos (was choosing demo dances)

> Ron Mackey wrote:
>
>> Jenny Bradley comes from the Nottingham area, - you know, Nottingham
>> Lace?
>
> Yep, but we're talking Shiftin' Bobbins here. Shiftin' Bobbins is by Roy
> Clowes and (I'm told) depicts the Dundee jute mills.
>
> Jute (the second-most commercially important cloth fibre, after cotton) is
> the
> raw material for Hessian cloth (burlap), sacking and other fabrics, comes
> mainly from India and Bangladesh, and in the UK used to be processed
> mainly
> in Dundee up until the 1970s or so, when it was mostly pushed out of the
> market by synthetics. It is now regaining commercial interest because it
> is
> 100% biodegradable. Being a fairly coarse type of fibre it is, however,
> not
> useful for making Nottingham lace!
>
> Hessian cloth is definitely a woven fabric and hence would be produced on
> a
> loom. This gives us, IMHO, the hands-across as the bobbins (reels)
> containing
> the unwoven jute fibres and the down-the-middle-and-up as the movement of
> the
> shuttle.
>
> Anselm
> --
> Anselm Lingnau, Friedberg, Germany .....................
> anselm@strathspey.org
> I wonder if other dogs think poodles are members of a weird religious
> cult.
> -- Rita
> Rudner
>

Dumbing down demos (was choosing demo dances)

Message 52714 · Agnes MacMichael · 5 Jun 2008 14:50:12 · Top

I think there are some that go in and out of the tweed. I remember when I
was very young visiting a mill down in the Borders of Scotland and watching
the tweed being woven. I remember the wooden bobbins go in and under to
weave the tartan. Maybe they are not called bobbins? However, this was an
explanation I was given when I saw dancers weaving from side to side. I
think it is called 'interpretation'.
Agnes

On 05/06/2008, Martin Sheffield <mj.sheffield@orange.fr> wrote:
>
>
> Le 5 juin 08 à 14:01, Agnes Macmichael a écrit :
>
>
>> My understanding of the weaving down the middle and up was that this was
>> the
>> bobbins?
>>
>
> Do bobbins not go round & round?
>
> Martin
>
>>
>>
>
>

Dumbing down demos (was choosing demo dances)

Message 52718 · Martin Sheffield · 5 Jun 2008 15:15:21 · Top

I stand corrected -- I need to polish up my English.

It appears that "bobbin" is not the same as French "bobine" as I had
assumed.

And yes, a bobbin does go back and forth across a weave.
Presumably the word is used since, within the shuttle, the thread is
wound around a "bobine".

Funny thing:
as a synonym, the dictionary gives ... "a reel" !

So what do the hands-across represent in Shiftin Bobbins?

Martin

Dumbing down demos (was choosing demo dances)

Message 52720 · Fiona Kopeny · 5 Jun 2008 15:48:05 · Top

Another funny thing.
A reel is a different piece of weaving equipment. It's one of the things
that can be used to prepare the thread for putting on the loom (warping) and
it .... gasp....spins!

Fiona

On Thu, Jun 5, 2008 at 8:15 AM, Martin Sheffield <mj.sheffield@orange.fr>
wrote:

> I stand corrected -- I need to polish up my English.
>
> It appears that "bobbin" is not the same as French "bobine" as I had
> assumed.
>
> And yes, a bobbin does go back and forth across a weave.
> Presumably the word is used since, within the shuttle, the thread is wound
> around a "bobine".
>
> Funny thing:
> as a synonym, the dictionary gives ... "a reel" !
>
> So what do the hands-across represent in Shiftin Bobbins?
>
> Martin
>
>

--
_________________________________________________________________
Fiona Kopeny, Import Facilitator
Seybold International Corp.

"There are three kinds of people in the world,
those who can count and those who can't."

View Alexander's website --> http://www.babiesonline.com/babies/a/alexj
View Robyn's website --> http://www.babiesonline.com/babies/r/robynk

Dumbing down demos (was choosing demo dances)

Message 52729 · ron.mackey · 6 Jun 2008 00:12:26 · Top

>
> So what do the hands-across represent in Shiftin Bobbins?
>
> Martin

Not quite sure what Jenny had in mind. Of course in hand lacemaking
there are a multiplicity of bobbins which are deftly shifted around to
produce those marvelous patterns but I have no idea what a sort of machine
would make a pattern but I do have a vague recollection of a cinema 'short'
in pre-history which showed such a machine and there were a number of
bobbins had a basic movement whirling around and back tho' the full pattern
was much more complex. Probably my imagination! :~)
Happy Dancing :)

Ron

Ron Mackey
RSCDS London, Croydon & International Branches

Dumbing down demos (was choosing demo dances)

Message 52730 · George Meikle · 6 Jun 2008 00:35:02 · Top

Ron,

I have always thought it was Roy Clowes who devised Shuftin' Bobbins - or
have I missed something?

George Meikle
Dunfermline

Ron wrote:-

Not quite sure what Jenny had in mind. Of course in hand lacemaking
there are a multiplicity of bobbins which are deftly shifted around to
produce those marvelous patterns but I have no idea what a sort of machine
would make a pattern but I do have a vague recollection of a cinema 'short'
in pre-history which showed such a machine and there were a number of
bobbins had a basic movement whirling around and back tho' the full pattern
was much more complex. Probably my imagination! :~)
Happy Dancing :)

Ron

Ron Mackey
RSCDS London, Croydon & International Branches

SBobs

Message 52733 · ron.mackey · 6 Jun 2008 00:43:12 · Top

> Ron,
>
> I have always thought it was Roy Clowes who devised Shuftin' Bobbins - or
> have I missed something?
>
> George Meikle
> Dunfermline

That was a mental blunder which must have occurred year ago and has
stayed with me ever since. Oooops:~)

SBobs

Message 52741 · Martin Sheffield · 6 Jun 2008 09:47:15 · Top

Le 6 juin 08 à 00:43, Ron Mackey a écrit re Sh B & Nottigham Lace :
>
> That was a mental blunder which must have occurred year ago and
> has stayed with me ever since. Oooops:~)

We msut have learnt these two dances at the same time, Ron. I too
invariably think of them as indissociable.

Martin

SBobs & Memory

Message 52760 · ron.mackey · 7 Jun 2008 02:45:39 · Top

We msut have learnt these two dances at the same time, Ron. I too
invariably think of them as indissociable.

Martin

Er, Yersss? Thinking about that my gut instinct says that NL came first and
SB a few years later but they were immediately associated. Could be one of
the causes for my blunder. However further research indicates otherwise.
The Nottingham Lace Book has a Napier Number of 346 which indicates quite an
early listing. Unfortunately the book is not dated. But - the Shiftin'
Bobbins Napier Number is 337!
It just shows how careful one has to be about long-term memory.
One thing I am pretty sure of is that we (in the London area) were well
familiar with Nottingham Lace as a dem dance well before Shiftin' Bobbins
caught up with us. (which was not a dem dance!)

lace, bobbins etc, quite OT

Message 52740 · Martin Sheffield · 6 Jun 2008 09:42:41 · Top

Whereas I had imagined that there were just a handful of centenarian
lace-makers still struggling bravely to survive in the face of
mechanization, a one-day gathering in the main square in the town I
was staying in in Andalucia attracted *hundreds* of elegant middle-
aged ladies who spent the day concentrating on their favorite hobby
(or livelihood). I calculated there must have been around 800
participants (of which I noticed only one man).
I had pictured lace-making as an activity involving a handful of
bobbins, but no, these industrious people were using dozens, even
hundreds of bobbins of fine thread, juggling with the most incredible
agility, and producing he most intricate and varied designs.

Alas, I failed to find any resemblance whatsoever with the movements
of the dancers in Sh B.

Martin

Dumbing down demos (was choosing demo dances)

Message 52728 · ron.mackey · 6 Jun 2008 00:00:25 · Top

I think there are some that go in and out of the tweed. I remember when I
was very young visiting a mill down in the Borders of Scotland and watching
the tweed being woven. I remember the wooden bobbins go in and under to
weave the tartan.

Are they not called 'shuttles'?
Ron

Dumbing down demos (was choosing demo dances)

Message 52738 · Angus Henry · 6 Jun 2008 04:54:45 · Top

Only if the machinery is working properly.

Angus

On 05-06-2008, at 22:11, Martin Sheffield wrote:

>
> Le 5 juin 08 à 14:01, Agnes Macmichael a écrit :
>
>>
>> My understanding of the weaving down the middle and up was that
>> this was the
>> bobbins?
>
> Do bobbins not go round & round?
>
> Martin
>>
>
>

Angus & Puka Henry
DARWIN, AUSTRALIA
Website: <http://www.users.on.net/~anguka/>

Dumbing down demos (was choosing demo dances)

Message 52773 · Peter Price · 8 Jun 2008 10:10:40 · Top

I am about to get a wee bit technical -

In weaving all the treads of the warp are threaded through the eye (like in
a needle) of the heddles which are ganged - all the even threads together
and the odd threads together.
The heddles move up and down in the loom. So when the 'even' heddle is
raised all those threads go up and the odd heddle (and threads) is
simultaneously lowered - this creates a tunnel (or shed) through which the
shuttle is passed or 'thrown'. This is then switched - the odd heddle is
raised and the even heddle lowered and the shuttle is thrown through the
tunnel back to the original side. This is the simplest of patterns.

There is a bobbin of thread in the shuttle and this thread becomes the woof
of the cloth.

The down the middle and up (IMHO) is the shuttle passing from side to side
on the loom.

Peter
On Thu, Jun 5, 2008 at 10:54 PM, Angus Henry <anguka@internode.on.net>
wrote:

> Only if the machinery is working properly.
>
> Angus
>
> On 05-06-2008, at 22:11, Martin Sheffield wrote:
>
>
>> Le 5 juin 08 à 14:01, Agnes Macmichael a écrit :
>>
>>
>>> My understanding of the weaving down the middle and up was that this was
>>> the
>>> bobbins?
>>>
>>
>> Do bobbins not go round & round?
>>
>> Martin
>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
> Angus & Puka Henry
> DARWIN, AUSTRALIA
> Website: <http://www.users.on.net/~anguka/<http://www.users.on.net/%7Eanguka/>
> >
>
>
>
>

Dumbing down demos (was choosing demo dances)

Message 52774 · Fiona Kopeny · 8 Jun 2008 16:44:32 · Top

The woof? I learned that as the weft.
Man, do you guys make me want to pull out my loom again.

Fiona
p.s. This has all been great though! I now realize that I was totally wrong
about the meaning of the dance. I had assumed sewing machine bobbins all
along.

On Sun, Jun 8, 2008 at 3:10 AM, Peter Price <peter.price1672@gmail.com>
wrote:

> I am about to get a wee bit technical -
>
> In weaving all the treads of the warp are threaded through the eye (like in
> a needle) of the heddles which are ganged - all the even threads together
> and the odd threads together.
> The heddles move up and down in the loom. So when the 'even' heddle is
> raised all those threads go up and the odd heddle (and threads) is
> simultaneously lowered - this creates a tunnel (or shed) through which the
> shuttle is passed or 'thrown'. This is then switched - the odd heddle is
> raised and the even heddle lowered and the shuttle is thrown through the
> tunnel back to the original side. This is the simplest of patterns.
>
> There is a bobbin of thread in the shuttle and this thread becomes the woof
> of the cloth.
>
> The down the middle and up (IMHO) is the shuttle passing from side to side
> on the loom.
>
> Peter
> On Thu, Jun 5, 2008 at 10:54 PM, Angus Henry <anguka@internode.on.net>
> wrote:
>
> > Only if the machinery is working properly.
> >
> > Angus
> >
> > On 05-06-2008, at 22:11, Martin Sheffield wrote:
> >
> >
> >> Le 5 juin 08 à 14:01, Agnes Macmichael a écrit :
> >>
> >>
> >>> My understanding of the weaving down the middle and up was that this
> was
> >>> the
> >>> bobbins?
> >>>
> >>
> >> Do bobbins not go round & round?
> >>
> >> Martin
> >>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>
> >>
> > Angus & Puka Henry
> > DARWIN, AUSTRALIA
> > Website: <http://www.users.on.net/~anguka/<
> http://www.users.on.net/%7Eanguka/ <http://www.users.on.net/~anguka/>>
> > >
> >
> >
> >
> >
>

--
_________________________________________________________________
Fiona Kopeny, Import Facilitator
Seybold International Corp.

"There are three kinds of people in the world,
those who can count and those who can't."

View Alexander's website --> http://www.babiesonline.com/babies/a/alexj
View Robyn's website --> http://www.babiesonline.com/babies/r/robynk

Scotland vs the Rest

Message 52782 · campbell · 9 Jun 2008 08:45:18 · Top

Hmm, just had to have a look at the programmes for Scotland vs the Rest. (26
out of 112), some interesting anomalies as to what is frequent in Scotland
and what is frequent overall:

Scotland's top ten with overall positions in brackets:

1 Ian Powrie's Farewell to Auchterarder (62!!)
2 Mairis Wedding (aarrgh) (11)
3 Catch the Wind (16)
4 Deil Amang the Tailors (1)
5 Dream Catcher (20)
6 Jubilee Jig (19)
7 Maxwell's Rant (8)
8 Mrs McLeod (83)
9 Piper and the Penguin (12)
10 Gang the Same Gate (21)
11 Gothenburg's Welcome (67!!)
12 Machine Without Horses (32)
13 Reel of the 51st Division (7)

Whereas excluding Scotland the list is (with overall in brackets, and
Scotland only in second brackets)

1 Deil Amang the Tailors (1) (4)
2 Pelorus Jack (2) (23)
3 Montgomeries Rant (6) (87!!)
4 Wild Geese (5)(52)
5 Minister on the Loch (4)(20)
6 Neidpath Castle (3) (22)
7 Irish Rover (9) (78)
8 Reel of the Royal Scots (13)(91!!)
9 Shiftin Bobbins (15) (220!!!!!)
10 Mrs Stewarts Jig (10) (42)

Perhaps the biggest difference is for Rose of the North, a credible 40th on
the overall list with 11 mentions, but all but 1 of these are outwith
Scotland.

All in all, a pretty substantial difference in tastes between Scotland and
the rest of the world. Would be interesting to see how England fares,
influenced by Scotland or not? (It's most frequent dance is Shiftin Bobbins,
as a matter of interest, whereas USA is jointly Deil Amang the Tailors and
Irish Rover, Australia is Deil Amang the Tailors and Neidpath Castle and
Canada is just Deil Amang the Tailors.) Of course, this is all early days
and the size of the sample is still not statistically significant, but I
find it fun and I hope you find it a bit interesting.

Campbell Tyler
Cape Town

Scotland vs the Rest

Message 52801 · Diane Jensen Donald · 9 Jun 2008 18:49:09 · Top

How interesting! I noticed this difference myself, and have been trying to
teach a few dances I enjoyed doing in Scotland in our class here. So far
they're usually met with at least some enthusiasm...

Diane Donald
Boise, ID USA

On Mon, Jun 9, 2008 at 12:45 AM, Campbell Tyler <campbell@tyler.co.za>
wrote:

> Hmm, just had to have a look at the programmes for Scotland vs the Rest.
> (26
> out of 112), some interesting anomalies as to what is frequent in Scotland
> and what is frequent overall:
>
> Scotland's top ten with overall positions in brackets:
>
> 1 Ian Powrie's Farewell to Auchterarder (62!!)
> 2 Mairis Wedding (aarrgh) (11)
> 3 Catch the Wind (16)
> 4 Deil Amang the Tailors (1)
> 5 Dream Catcher (20)
> 6 Jubilee Jig (19)
> 7 Maxwell's Rant (8)
> 8 Mrs McLeod (83)
> 9 Piper and the Penguin (12)
> 10 Gang the Same Gate (21)
> 11 Gothenburg's Welcome (67!!)
> 12 Machine Without Horses (32)
> 13 Reel of the 51st Division (7)
>
> Whereas excluding Scotland the list is (with overall in brackets, and
> Scotland only in second brackets)
>
> 1 Deil Amang the Tailors (1) (4)
> 2 Pelorus Jack (2) (23)
> 3 Montgomeries Rant (6) (87!!)
> 4 Wild Geese (5)(52)
> 5 Minister on the Loch (4)(20)
> 6 Neidpath Castle (3) (22)
> 7 Irish Rover (9) (78)
> 8 Reel of the Royal Scots (13)(91!!)
> 9 Shiftin Bobbins (15) (220!!!!!)
> 10 Mrs Stewarts Jig (10) (42)
>
> Perhaps the biggest difference is for Rose of the North, a credible 40th on
> the overall list with 11 mentions, but all but 1 of these are outwith
> Scotland.
>
> All in all, a pretty substantial difference in tastes between Scotland and
> the rest of the world. Would be interesting to see how England fares,
> influenced by Scotland or not? (It's most frequent dance is Shiftin
> Bobbins,
> as a matter of interest, whereas USA is jointly Deil Amang the Tailors and
> Irish Rover, Australia is Deil Amang the Tailors and Neidpath Castle and
> Canada is just Deil Amang the Tailors.) Of course, this is all early days
> and the size of the sample is still not statistically significant, but I
> find it fun and I hope you find it a bit interesting.
>
> Campbell Tyler
> Cape Town
>
>

Dumbing down demos (was choosing demo dances)

Message 52709 · Anselm Lingnau · 5 Jun 2008 14:12:58 · Top

Martin Sheffield wrote:

> I had a note from the southern hemisphere recently expressing
> surprise that we, here in the north, zigzagged down and back in Sh
> B.

What do you mean, »zigzagged down and back«? That's a variation I haven't
heard about.

Anselm
--
Anselm Lingnau, Friedberg, Germany ..................... anselm@strathspey.org
We must respect the other fellow's religion, but only in the sense and to the
extent that we respect his theory that his wife is beautiful and his children
smart. -- Henry Louis Mencken

Dumbing down demos (was choosing demo dances)

Message 52712 · Martin Sheffield · 5 Jun 2008 14:43:13 · Top

Le 5 juin 08 à 14:12, Anselm Lingnau a écrit :

> Martin Sheffield wrote:
>
>> I had a note from the southern hemisphere recently expressing
>> surprise that we, here in the north, zigzagged down and back in Sh
>> B.
>
> What do you mean, »zigzagged down and back«? That's a variation I
> haven't
> heard about.

towards the right on one skip-change, toward the left on the next, etc.

Martin

Tailoring demos to the audience (was Dumbing down demos)

Message 52698 · Ian Brockbank · 5 Jun 2008 10:14:12 · Top

Hi Diane,

> Dumbing down demos (was choosing demo dances)

Your choice of new subject line shows your view of the conversation.

Remember, a demo is for a purpose. Presumably there's an audience.
If they don't know about dancing, you need to make sure your
selection of dances will mean something to them anyway - they are
your customers. So it's good to include:

- clear figures (circles, wheels, balances, etc).
- symmetry helps highlight the structure of a dance.
- a few repetitions so they can spot the figures coming
round again, but not so many they get bored; we tend to
use 3 or 4 times through quick-time and twice through
strathspeys.
- simple figures and dances that the dem team are familiar
with (if the team is worrying about geography they can't
make it look good).
- changes of shape, tempo, orientation so they've got
something else to look at. In a long programme, throw
in something like Hebridean Weaving Lilt/Moulin Dhu or
some Highland just for a change.
- standing couples most of the time to give a shape for the
figures to happen within.
- don't just pick dances just to form a theme with the names.
That doesn't mean anything to the audience, nor does it
mean the dances combine to make a good show.

Remember - you're dancing for them, not yourselves (well, in the
first instance; obviously you'd hope to enjoy it too, but that's
not the primary purpose in this instance). You need to make it
something THEY will like.

Cheers,

Ian Brockbank
Edinburgh, Scotland
ian@scottishdance.net
http://www.scottishdance.net/

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Tailoring demos to the audience (was Dumbing down demos)

Message 52702 · GOSS9@telefonica.net · 5 Jun 2008 12:27:08 · Top

I agree, too often the demo is an ego trip for a team of good dancers.
The POV or focus of dancers is inside the set, and not the audience. So
what is complicated and fun from the inside, is often a meaningless
jumble as seen from the outside.

Tailoring demos to the audience (was Dumbing down demos)

Message 52734 · Diane Jensen Donald · 6 Jun 2008 00:54:37 · Top

Guilty as charged. I know I lean much too far into the show-off camp
sometimes. It's reminders like this that tend to wake me up and remind me
that dancing for my own pleasure is a very small part of why I do SCD.

Diane Donald
Boise, Idaho USA

On 6/5/08, GOSS9@telefonica.net <GOSS9@telefonica.net> wrote:
>
> I agree, too often the demo is an ego trip for a team of good dancers.
> The POV or focus of dancers is inside the set, and not the audience. So
> what is complicated and fun from the inside, is often a meaningless
> jumble as seen from the outside.
>
>
>

Dumbing down demos (was choosing demo dances)

Message 52724 · James Mungall · 5 Jun 2008 22:48:54 · Top

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Diane,
&nbsp;
I agree with you that you might intimidate some prospective dancers--but you also want to impress those watching.&nbsp; If it looks too boring, then you encourage no one to try SCD.&nbsp; I think if you varied your program with a wide range of dances easy to advanced you encourage prospective dancers, but also impress others (both dancers and non-dancers)... and even hook possibly hook prospective dancers by showing them that the figures do get harder and there is always another level to go for.&nbsp; You do get a very different impression of SCD if you only see&nbsp;"The Cumberland Reel"&nbsp;and the "Kingston Flyer" than if you watch a group perform "The Golden Snitch" or "The Best Set in the Hall."&nbsp; We don't want to do too many of any one level and give spectators the wrong impression.&nbsp; See personally, my favorite dance is the Foursome Reel (and Reel of Tulloch/Hullachan)--the figures are very basic but the footwork is different in our
version than in any other dance we do, so it's more visually interesting and makes a great demo dance.&nbsp; I think we forget sometimes that in demos we have to consider varied footwork and not just varied figures.&nbsp; IE: the Petronella is heavy on the Pas de Basque and it looks more appealing as far as footwork is concerned... well... usually.&nbsp; I've seen some "interesting" versions of the Petronella.
&nbsp;
James Mungall
Baton Rouge, LA, USA
&nbsp;
P.S.&nbsp; I don't despise Shiftin' Bobbins, but it is one of the last dances I would ever request.&nbsp; I don't know what it is about it that makes me dislike it like I do.&nbsp; Maybe I just think it's trite and overdone?

--- On Wed, 6/4/08, Diane Jensen Donald &lt;diane.j.donald@gmail.com&gt; wrote:

From: Diane Jensen Donald &lt;diane.j.donald@gmail.com&gt;
Subject: Dumbing down demos (was choosing demo dances)
To: jeb_mungall@yahoo.com, "SCD news and discussion" &lt;strathspey@strathspey.org&gt;
Date: Wednesday, June 4, 2008, 12:24 PM

James,
&nbsp;
As usual I agree with you.&nbsp; It's challenging for me to demo for non-dancers sometimes because I want to show off every bit of my know-how.&nbsp; However, usually what this seems to do is intimidate non-dancers who might be inclined to try it.&nbsp; It was lovely when I was in Scotland and was able to do a few demos for other dancers and really let 'er rip.&nbsp; That said, I think it would be pretty tough to keep reels out of a dem.
&nbsp;
Diane
Boise, Idaho
&nbsp;
P.S. How can a young energetic dance enthusiast like you not enjoy Shiftin' Bobbins?
&nbsp;
On 6/2/08, James Mungall &lt;jeb_mungall@yahoo.com&gt; wrote:
Well whether fortunately or unfortunately reels are a basis of SCD.&nbsp;&nbsp;I'm not one that supports avoiding reels for demos.&nbsp;&nbsp;I agree that they might be harder to catch/comprehend for the average spectator--but we shouldn't "dumb-down" our selections either.&nbsp;&nbsp;Reels are too much a part of SCD to avoid them for demos entirely (in my opinion anyway.)&nbsp;&nbsp;I understand the symmetry that's attractive to the human eye... Posties is great and Shiftin' Bobbins (though I really dislike dancing it) is also visually interesting.&nbsp;&nbsp;I'm all for picking visually attractive dances for demos but I don't like to disclude reel-based dances.

James Mungall
Baton Rouge, LA, USA

--- On Mon, 6/2/08, Martin Sheffield &lt;mj.sheffield@orange.fr&gt; wrote:

&gt; From: Martin Sheffield &lt;mj.sheffield@orange.fr&gt;
&gt; Subject: Choosing demo dances (Was: dances for 3 cpl sets?)
&gt; To: jeb_mungall@yahoo.com, "SCD news and discussion" &lt;strathspey@strathspey.org&gt;
&gt; Date: Monday, June 2, 2008, 12:36 PM
&gt; Le 2 juin 08 à 17:28, James Mungall a écrit :
&gt;
&gt; &gt;&nbsp;&nbsp;I'll second Wendy's suggestion of Flight of
&gt; the Falcon.
&gt;
&gt; For a public performance?
&gt; I'd say that reels of three are among the least
&gt; readable/
&gt; understandable figures for the layman. And while a falcon
&gt; reel well
&gt; executed can be very elegant, I imagine that it must be
&gt; even less
&gt; clear for the average spectator.&nbsp;&nbsp;Straight lines, circles,
&gt; triangles
&gt; are easy on the eye. Promenades, poussettes &amp;
&gt; allemandes should be
&gt; worth watching. Turns (RH/LH or 2H) are fine. Reels,
&gt; however,
&gt; especially when not symmetrical, are a different matter.
&gt; Just think
&gt; how long it takes a beginner dancer to undersand the logic
&gt; of a reel,
&gt; in spite of regular practicing.&nbsp;&nbsp;The spectator sees a reel
&gt; once or
&gt; twice and wonders what on earth we are doing.
&gt;
&gt; Although it is not our main purpose in life, our club was
&gt; asked to
&gt; put on a little show the other day.
&gt; We did Shifting Bobbins and Postie's Jig, for their
&gt; symmetry;
&gt; Wind on Loch, since the timing of the interlocked reels
&gt; allows an
&gt; in&amp;out movement for the whole set, easier to understand
&gt; than an
&gt; ordinart reel;
&gt; Piper &amp; Penguin, for a different formation, with
&gt; understandable
&gt; patterns;
&gt; Johnnie Walker, likewise, plus the change of tempo to wake
&gt; up the
&gt; audience;
&gt; St Martin's Cross, for straight lines symmetry and
&gt; movement.
&gt; Midnight Toil, a 5-cp set (but works as a 3-cp), with the
&gt; two active
&gt; couples echoing each other (covering) .
&gt;
&gt; Sorry, these are not what Monica originally asked for, but
&gt; I think it
&gt; is wise to consider which dances are worth watching and
&gt; why.
&gt; I did not mention the real reason for choosing the above.
&gt; Our dancers
&gt; know them well enough to be relaxed and look as if they are
&gt; enjoying
&gt; the activity.&nbsp;&nbsp;The non-specialist spectator does not care a
&gt; damn
&gt; whether our feet are pointing correctly or whether our
&gt; hands are the
&gt; correct height from the floor. But he can see whether we
&gt; are enjoying
&gt; ourselves or not, and that is what counts.
&gt;
&gt; Martin


Dumbing down demos (was choosing demo dances)

Message 52725 · James Mungall · 5 Jun 2008 22:52:50 · Top

Sorry... don't know how all that gobbledeegoop got there. My message was this:

Diane,

I agree with you that you might intimidate some prospective dancers--but you also want to impress those watching. If it looks too boring, then you encourage no one to try SCD. I think if you varied your program with a wide range of dances easy to advanced you encourage prospective dancers, but also impress others (both dancers and non-dancers)... and even hook possibly hook prospective dancers by showing them that the figures do get harder and there is always another level to go for. You do get a very different impression of SCD if you only see "The Cumberland Reel" and the "Kingston Flyer" than if you watch a group perform "The Golden Snitch" or "The Best Set in the Hall." We don't want to do too many of any one level and give spectators the wrong impression. See personally, my favorite dance is the Foursome Reel (and Reel of Tulloch/Hullachan)--the figures are very basic but the footwork is different in our version than in any other dance we do,
so it's more visually interesting and makes a great demo dance. I think we forget sometimes that in demos we have to consider varied footwork and not just varied figures. IE: the Petronella is heavy on the Pas de Basque and it looks more appealing as far as footwork is concerned... well... usually. I've seen some "interesting" versions of the Petronella.


James Mungall

Baton Rouge, LA, USA


P.S. I don't despise Shiftin' Bobbins, but it is one of the last dances I would ever request. I don't know what it is about it that makes me dislike it like I do. But I love dancing, and I'd much rather dance Shiftin' Bobbins than not dance at all.

--- On Thu, 6/5/08, James Mungall <jeb_mungall@yahoo.com> wrote:

From: James Mungall <jeb_mungall@yahoo.com>
Subject: Re: Dumbing down demos (was choosing demo dances)
To: "SCD news and discussion" <strathspey@strathspey.org>
Date: Thursday, June 5, 2008, 3:48 PM

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Baton Rouge, LA, USA --- On Mon, 6\/2\/08, Martin Sheffield wrote:
> From: Martin Sheffield > Subject: Choosing demo dances

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Diane,
&nbsp;
I agree with you that you might intimidate some prospective dancers--but you
also want to impress those watching.&nbsp; If it looks too boring, then you
encourage no one to try SCD.&nbsp; I think if you varied your program with a
wide range of dances easy to advanced you encourage prospective dancers, but
also impress others (both dancers and non-dancers)... and even hook possibly
hook prospective dancers by showing them that the figures do get harder and
there is always another level to go for.&nbsp; You do get a very different
impression of SCD if you only see&nbsp;"The Cumberland
Reel"&nbsp;and the "Kingston Flyer" than if you watch a
group perform "The Golden Snitch" or "The Best Set in the
Hall."&nbsp; We don't want to do too many of any one level and
give spectators the wrong impression.&nbsp; See personally, my favorite
dance is the Foursome Reel (and Reel of Tulloch/Hullachan)--the figures are
very basic but the footwork is different in our
version than in any other dance we do, so it's more visually interesting
and makes a great demo dance.&nbsp; I think we forget sometimes that in
demos we have to consider varied footwork and not just varied
figures.&nbsp; IE: the Petronella is heavy on the Pas de Basque and it
looks more appealing as far as footwork is concerned... well...
usually.&nbsp; I've seen some "interesting" versions of the
Petronella.
&nbsp;
James Mungall
Baton Rouge, LA, USA
&nbsp;
P.S.&nbsp; I don't despise Shiftin' Bobbins, but it is one of the
last dances I would ever request.&nbsp; I don't know what it is about
it that makes me dislike it like I do.&nbsp; Maybe I just think it's
trite and overdone?

--- On Wed, 6/4/08, Diane Jensen Donald
&lt;diane.j.donald@gmail.com&gt; wrote:

From: Diane Jensen Donald &lt;diane.j.donald@gmail.com&gt;
Subject: Dumbing down demos (was choosing demo dances)
To: jeb_mungall@yahoo.com, "SCD news and discussion"
&lt;strathspey@strathspey.org&gt;
Date: Wednesday, June 4, 2008, 12:24 PM

James,
&nbsp;
As usual I agree with you.&nbsp; It's challenging for me to demo for
non-dancers sometimes because I want to show off every bit of my
know-how.&nbsp; However, usually what this seems to do is intimidate
non-dancers who might be inclined to try it.&nbsp; It was lovely when I was
in Scotland and was able to do a few demos for other dancers and really let
'er rip.&nbsp; That said, I think it would be pretty tough to keep
reels out of a dem.
&nbsp;
Diane
Boise, Idaho
&nbsp;
P.S. How can a young energetic dance enthusiast like you not enjoy Shiftin'
Bobbins?
&nbsp;
On 6/2/08, James Mungall &lt;jeb_mungall@yahoo.com&gt; wrote:
Well whether fortunately or unfortunately reels are a basis of
SCD.&nbsp;&nbsp;I'm not one that supports avoiding reels for
demos.&nbsp;&nbsp;I agree that they might be harder to catch/comprehend
for the average spectator--but we shouldn't "dumb-down" our
selections either.&nbsp;&nbsp;Reels are too much a part of SCD to avoid
them for demos entirely (in my opinion anyway.)&nbsp;&nbsp;I understand
the symmetry that's attractive to the human eye... Posties is great and
Shiftin' Bobbins (though I really dislike dancing it) is also visually
interesting.&nbsp;&nbsp;I'm all for picking visually attractive
dances for demos but I don't like to disclude reel-based dances.

James Mungall
Baton Rouge, LA, USA

--- On Mon, 6/2/08, Martin Sheffield &lt;mj.sheffield@orange.fr&gt;
wrote:

&gt; From: Martin Sheffield &lt;mj.sheffield@orange.fr&gt;
&gt; Subject: Choosing demo dances (Was: dances for 3 cpl sets?)
&gt; To: jeb_mungall@yahoo.com, "SCD news and discussion"
&lt;strathspey@strathspey.org&gt;
&gt; Date: Monday, June 2, 2008, 12:36 PM
&gt; Le 2 juin 08 à 17:28, James Mungall a écrit :
&gt;
&gt; &gt;&nbsp;&nbsp;I'll second Wendy's suggestion of
Flight of
&gt; the Falcon.
&gt;
&gt; For a public performance?
&gt; I'd say that reels of three are among the least
&gt; readable/
&gt; understandable figures for the layman. And while a falcon
&gt; reel well
&gt; executed can be very elegant, I imagine that it must be
&gt; even less
&gt; clear for the average spectator.&nbsp;&nbsp;Straight lines,
circles,
&gt; triangles
&gt; are easy on the eye. Promenades, poussettes &amp;
&gt; allemandes should be
&gt; worth watching. Turns (RH/LH or 2H) are fine. Reels,
&gt; however,
&gt; especially when not symmetrical, are a different matter.
&gt; Just think
&gt; how long it takes a beginner dancer to undersand the logic
&gt; of a reel,
&gt; in spite of regular practicing.&nbsp;&nbsp;The spectator sees
a reel
&gt; once or
&gt; twice and wonders what on earth we are doing.
&gt;
&gt; Although it is not our main purpose in life, our club was
&gt; asked to
&gt; put on a little show the other day.
&gt; We did Shifting Bobbins and Postie's Jig, for their
&gt; symmetry;
&gt; Wind on Loch, since the timing of the interlocked reels
&gt; allows an
&gt; in&amp;out movement for the whole set, easier to understand
&gt; than an
&gt; ordinart reel;
&gt; Piper &amp; Penguin, for a different formation, with
&gt; understandable
&gt; patterns;
&gt; Johnnie Walker, likewise, plus the change of tempo to wake
&gt; up the
&gt; audience;
&gt; St Martin's Cross, for straight lines symmetry and
&gt; movement.
&gt; Midnight Toil, a 5-cp set (but works as a 3-cp), with the
&gt; two active
&gt; couples echoing each other (covering) .
&gt;
&gt; Sorry, these are not what Monica originally asked for, but
&gt; I think it
&gt; is wise to consider which dances are worth watching and
&gt; why.
&gt; I did not mention the real reason for choosing the above.
&gt; Our dancers
&gt; know them well enough to be relaxed and look as if they are
&gt; enjoying
&gt; the activity.&nbsp;&nbsp;The non-specialist spectator does not
care a
&gt; damn
&gt; whether our feet are pointing correctly or whether our
&gt; hands are the
&gt; correct height from the floor. But he can see whether we
&gt; are enjoying
&gt; ourselves or not, and that is what counts.
&gt;
&gt; Martin

Dumbing down demos (was choosing demo dances)

Message 52731 · Diane Jensen Donald · 6 Jun 2008 00:38:04 · Top

>
> P.S. I don't despise Shiftin' Bobbins, but it is one of the last dances I
> would ever request. I don't know what it is about it that makes me dislike
> it like I do. But I love dancing, and I'd much rather dance Shiftin'
> Bobbins than not dance at all.

James,

As usual I agree with you on all points. I would dance all the ones that
drive me nuts (Eightsome Reel, anybody?) rather than sit still and watch.
Now if only I could be permanent Queen of Dancing and call all the shots.
:) Guess I'll have to settle for part-time teacher. Heh.

Diane

Boise, Idaho USA

Diane, Queen of the Dance

Message 52736 · James Mungall · 6 Jun 2008 01:51:40 · Top

If you get to be permanent Queen of Dancing can we please all pass left shoulders in Mairie's Wedding and Polharrow Burn? Or at very least not give partners weird looks when they ask to? Oh, what other dancing preferences and peeves would I place before your majesty for a ruling? Hmm...

James Mungall

--- On Thu, 6/5/08, Diane Jensen Donald <diane.j.donald@gmail.com> wrote:

> From: Diane Jensen Donald <diane.j.donald@gmail.com>
> Subject: Re: Dumbing down demos (was choosing demo dances)
> To: "SCD news and discussion" <strathspey@strathspey.org>
> Date: Thursday, June 5, 2008, 5:38 PM
> >
> > P.S. I don't despise Shiftin' Bobbins, but it
> is one of the last dances I
> > would ever request. I don't know what it is about
> it that makes me dislike
> > it like I do. But I love dancing, and I'd much
> rather dance Shiftin'
> > Bobbins than not dance at all.
>
>
> James,
>
> As usual I agree with you on all points. I would dance all
> the ones that
> drive me nuts (Eightsome Reel, anybody?) rather than sit
> still and watch.
> Now if only I could be permanent Queen of Dancing and call
> all the shots.
> :) Guess I'll have to settle for part-time teacher.
> Heh.
>
> Diane
>
> Boise, Idaho USA


Diane, Queen of the Dance

Message 52737 · Marian Stroh · 6 Jun 2008 02:34:39 · Top

May I vote, too? Although most people in our area prefer to pass right
shoulders in Mairi's Wedding, I like it the way it was written - left
shoulders. At least we get to ask our partners which shoulder - or suggest
the left one.

Marian Stroh, Reno

Diane, Queen of the Dance

Message 52739 · James Mungall · 6 Jun 2008 05:19:54 · Top

Oh, most everyone likes right shoulder in my area too. My dad and I prefer it as written--I've gotten the new young dancers we have to enjoy it and dance it either way. I don't really mind it all that much for Mairie's Wedding, but I don't like it if they do it on Polharrow Burn. We have a rule in our class that whoever is teaching the dance makes the rules. So when our normal teacher teaches it's right shoulders... when my dad (Tom) has the class it's done as written. And when I taught Anselm's "The Golden Snitch" I made sure I was clear it was left shoulder pass. Soooo... in other words, I'm okay with passing right shoulder on Mairie's but not in other dances where it's written as left shoulder. Bytheway, I'm not in for another Mairie's Wedding discussion. We've beaten that horse to death!

James Mungall
Baton Rouge, LA, USA

--- On Thu, 6/5/08, Marian Stroh <mstrohinreno@charter.net> wrote:

> From: Marian Stroh <mstrohinreno@charter.net>
> Subject: Re: Diane, Queen of the Dance
> To: jeb_mungall@yahoo.com, "SCD news and discussion" <strathspey@strathspey.org>
> Date: Thursday, June 5, 2008, 7:34 PM
> May I vote, too? Although most people in our area prefer to
> pass right
> shoulders in Mairi's Wedding, I like it the way it was
> written - left
> shoulders. At least we get to ask our partners which
> shoulder - or suggest
> the left one.
>
> Marian Stroh, Reno


Diane, Queen of the Dance

Message 52744 · Ian Brockbank · 6 Jun 2008 11:27:25 · Top

> [MW shoulders]

Oh no - it's started AGAIN!!!!!

Do you guys not realise how many times we've been through this?

Ian Brockbank
Edinburgh, Scotland
ian@scottishdance.net
http://www.scottishdance.net/

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-------------------------------------------------
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Tel: +44 (0)131 272 7000
Fax: +44 (0)131 272 7001
Web: www.wolfsonmicro.com

Registered in Scotland

Company number SC089839

Registered office:

Westfield House, 26 Westfield Road, Edinburgh, EH11 2QB, UK

Diane, Queen of the Dance

Message 52745 · Pia Walker · 6 Jun 2008 12:21:15 · Top

It's a good thing we don't have four shoulders :>) imagine the discussion :
Would it be left/right first shoulder or second shoulder or should that be
left/right shoulder position or ..... should we call it first, second,
third and fourth shoulder/shoulder position. Then should we go right or
left with first shoulder or second shoulder or should that be shoulder
position :>)

Pia

-----Original Message-----
From: strathspey-bounces-pia=intamail.com@strathspey.org
[mailto:strathspey-bounces-pia=intamail.com@strathspey.org]On Behalf Of Ian
Brockbank
Sent: 06 June 2008 10:27
To: SCD news and discussion
Subject: RE: Diane, Queen of the Dance

> [MW shoulders]

Oh no - it's started AGAIN!!!!!

Do you guys not realise how many times we've been through this?

Ian Brockbank
Edinburgh, Scotland
ian@scottishdance.net
http://www.scottishdance.net/

Privacy & Confidentiality Notice
-------------------------------------------------
This message and any attachments contain privileged and confidential
information that is intended solely for the person(s) to whom it is
addressed. If you are not an intended recipient you must not: read; copy;
distribute; discuss; take any action in or make any reliance upon the
contents of this message; nor open or read any attachment. If you have
received this message in error, please notify us as soon as possible on the
following telephone number and destroy this message including any
attachments. Thank you.
-------------------------------------------------
Wolfson Microelectronics plc
Tel: +44 (0)131 272 7000
Fax: +44 (0)131 272 7001
Web: www.wolfsonmicro.com

Registered in Scotland

Company number SC089839

Registered office:

Westfield House, 26 Westfield Road, Edinburgh, EH11 2QB, UK

Diane, Queen of the Dance

Message 52753 · Steve Wyrick · 6 Jun 2008 16:44:12 · Top

Yeah, the next person who complains of no traffic on the list, all you
have to do is mention right shoulder pass in MW and it'll start right
up again... :-)

On Fri, Jun 6, 2008 at 2:27 AM, Ian Brockbank
<Ian.Brockbank@wolfsonmicro.com> wrote:
>> [MW shoulders]
>
> Oh no - it's started AGAIN!!!!!
>
> Do you guys not realise how many times we've been through this?
>

--
Steve Wyrick -- Concord, California

Diane, Queen of the Dance

Message 52762 · Diane Jensen Donald · 7 Jun 2008 03:34:28 · Top

*waves scepter menacingly*

Now that's just about enough of that.

I still reserve the right to teach dances with funny passes (taught
Butterscotch and Honey with right shoulder passes not too long ago), but as
erstwhile Dancing Queen I decree all those dancing Mairi's Wedding should
come to amicable agreements about shoulder passes and recognize that just
because something is fun it is not necessarily correct.

Let it be written, let it be done.

Diane

:)

On Fri, Jun 6, 2008 at 8:44 AM, Steve Wyrick <sjwyrick@gmail.com> wrote:

> Yeah, the next person who complains of no traffic on the list, all you
> have to do is mention right shoulder pass in MW and it'll start right
> up again... :-)
>
> On Fri, Jun 6, 2008 at 2:27 AM, Ian Brockbank
> <Ian.Brockbank@wolfsonmicro.com> wrote:
> >> [MW shoulders]
> >
> > Oh no - it's started AGAIN!!!!!
> >
> > Do you guys not realise how many times we've been through this?
> >
>
>
> --
> Steve Wyrick -- Concord, California
>

Diane, Queen of the Dance

Message 52764 · James Mungall · 7 Jun 2008 06:45:43 · Top

I changed my mind.&nbsp; Americans just should not be royalty I guess.&nbsp; I think that the only correct way IS the fun way.&nbsp; What dancing is worth doing if it isn't fun?&nbsp; Even I think Shiftin' Bobbins is at least a little bit fun.
&nbsp;
James

--- On Fri, 6/6/08, Diane Jensen Donald &lt;diane.j.donald@gmail.com&gt; wrote:

From: Diane Jensen Donald &lt;diane.j.donald@gmail.com&gt;
Subject: Re: Diane, Queen of the Dance
To: "SCD news and discussion" &lt;strathspey@strathspey.org&gt;
Date: Friday, June 6, 2008, 8:34 PM

*waves scepter menacingly*

Now that's just about enough of that.

I still reserve the right to teach dances with funny passes (taught
Butterscotch and Honey with right shoulder passes not too long ago), but as
erstwhile Dancing Queen I decree all those dancing Mairi's Wedding should
come to amicable agreements about shoulder passes and recognize that just
because something is fun it is not necessarily correct.

Let it be written, let it be done.

Diane

:)

On Fri, Jun 6, 2008 at 8:44 AM, Steve Wyrick &lt;sjwyrick@gmail.com&gt; wrote:

&gt; Yeah, the next person who complains of no traffic on the list, all you
&gt; have to do is mention right shoulder pass in MW and it'll start right
&gt; up again... :-)
&gt;
&gt; On Fri, Jun 6, 2008 at 2:27 AM, Ian Brockbank
&gt; &lt;Ian.Brockbank@wolfsonmicro.com&gt; wrote:
&gt; &gt;&gt; [MW shoulders]
&gt; &gt;
&gt; &gt; Oh no - it's started AGAIN!!!!!
&gt; &gt;
&gt; &gt; Do you guys not realise how many times we've been through this?
&gt; &gt;
&gt;
&gt;
&gt; --
&gt; Steve Wyrick -- Concord, California
&gt;


Diane, Queen of the Dance

Message 52766 · redrose_solutions · 7 Jun 2008 11:58:23 · Top

James wrote:

>I changed my mind. Americans just should not be royalty I guess. I
think that the only correct way IS the fun way. What dancing is worth
doing if it isn't fun? Even I think Shiftin' Bobbins is at least a
little bit fun.

Of course dancing should be fun <g> But is fun subjective or
objective? If I think something is fun, does it necessarily follow that
others do as well? What if we disagree on what constitutes fun? Are we
both correct? How will this affect the dance? Are we going to
compromise or collide?

Cheers
Susi

Susi Mayr
Vienna (Austria) & Surrey (UK)

____________________________________________________

EURO 2008 with Tiscali - http://www.tiscali.co.uk/events/2008/euro-2008

____________________________________________________

Diane, Queen of the Dance

Message 52767 · Anselm Lingnau · 7 Jun 2008 13:20:09 · Top

Susi Mayr wrote:

> What if we disagree on what constitutes fun? Are we
> both correct? How will this affect the dance? Are we going to
> compromise or collide?

SCD is a group pursuit and, as such, any given group doing SCD will have to
converge on a notion of fun that is shared by enough of its members to make
up a set (and then some) or risk oblivion. Extra credit if that notion of fun
is compatible to the world-wide standardisation that is one of the strengths
of RSCDS-style SCD, such that the members of the group can go off and dance
elsewhere.

Exactly what that notion looks like is of course up to the circumstances at
hand. The good thing is that no consistency is required -- one can enjoy
oneself tremendously on Tuesday during a demonstration team practice under
the expert guidance of a very strict teacher, have lots of fun on Thursday
helping out in the beginners' class, and really let one's hair down at the
ball on Saturday night. On the other hand, there may be people who can only
truly enjoy SCD when they get to do their favourite dances with their
favourite embellishments (and, presumably, their favourite choice of other
dancers in the set) but that is surely their own loss.

Anselm
--
Anselm Lingnau, Friedberg, Germany ..................... anselm@strathspey.org
No question that there's an aura about the Nobel [prize for literature] that
seems to transform dwarfs into giants, mice into men, and disarms skeptics in
the process. -- George Rafael, »The ignoble prize«, Salon Books, 10.11.2006

Diane, Queen of the Dance

Message 52768 · Kirk Bachler · 7 Jun 2008 16:33:10 · Top

----- Original Message -----
From: "Anselm Lingnau" <anselm@strathspey.org>
To: <redrose_solutions@tiscali.co.uk>; "SCD news and discussion"
<strathspey@strathspey.org>
Sent: 06/07/2008 5:20 AM
Subject: Re: Diane, Queen of the Dance

Susi Mayr wrote:

> What if we disagree on what constitutes fun? Are we
> both correct? How will this affect the dance? Are we going to
> compromise or collide?

SCD is a group pursuit and, as such, any given group doing SCD will have to
converge on a notion of fun that is shared by enough of its members to make
up a set (and then some) or risk oblivion. Extra credit if that notion of
fun
is compatible to the world-wide standardisation that is one of the strengths
of RSCDS-style SCD, such that the members of the group can go off and dance
elsewhere.

Exactly what that notion looks like is of course up to the circumstances at
hand. The good thing is that no consistency is required -- one can enjoy
oneself tremendously on Tuesday during a demonstration team practice under
the expert guidance of a very strict teacher, have lots of fun on Thursday
helping out in the beginners' class, and really let one's hair down at the
ball on Saturday night. On the other hand, there may be people who can only
truly enjoy SCD when they get to do their favourite dances with their
favourite embellishments (and, presumably, their favourite choice of other
dancers in the set) but that is surely their own loss.

Anselm
--
Anselm Lingnau, Friedberg, Germany .....................
anselm@strathspey.org
No question that there's an aura about the Nobel [prize for literature] that
seems to transform dwarfs into giants, mice into men, and disarms skeptics
in
the process. -- George Rafael, »The ignoble prize«, Salon Books,
10.11.2006

Diane, Queen of the Dance

Message 52769 · Kirk Bachler · 7 Jun 2008 16:36:32 · Top

Very nicely stated, Anselm.Would you permit my wife to put it in our branch
newsletter(space permitting) with proper attribution ,of course?

Kirk Bachler ,Twin Cities USA
----- Original Message -----
From: "Anselm Lingnau" <anselm@strathspey.org>
To: <redrose_solutions@tiscali.co.uk>; "SCD news and discussion"
<strathspey@strathspey.org>
Sent: 06/07/2008 5:20 AM
Subject: Re: Diane, Queen of the Dance

Susi Mayr wrote:

> What if we disagree on what constitutes fun? Are we
> both correct? How will this affect the dance? Are we going to
> compromise or collide?

SCD is a group pursuit and, as such, any given group doing SCD will have to
converge on a notion of fun that is shared by enough of its members to make
up a set (and then some) or risk oblivion. Extra credit if that notion of
fun
is compatible to the world-wide standardisation that is one of the strengths
of RSCDS-style SCD, such that the members of the group can go off and dance
elsewhere.

Exactly what that notion looks like is of course up to the circumstances at
hand. The good thing is that no consistency is required -- one can enjoy
oneself tremendously on Tuesday during a demonstration team practice under
the expert guidance of a very strict teacher, have lots of fun on Thursday
helping out in the beginners' class, and really let one's hair down at the
ball on Saturday night. On the other hand, there may be people who can only
truly enjoy SCD when they get to do their favourite dances with their
favourite embellishments (and, presumably, their favourite choice of other
dancers in the set) but that is surely their own loss.

Anselm
--
Anselm Lingnau, Friedberg, Germany .....................
anselm@strathspey.org
No question that there's an aura about the Nobel [prize for literature] that
seems to transform dwarfs into giants, mice into men, and disarms skeptics
in
the process. -- George Rafael, »The ignoble prize«, Salon Books,
10.11.2006

Diane, Queen of the Dance

Message 52770 · Thomas G. Mungall, III · 7 Jun 2008 17:40:50 · Top

"...Et cetera, Et cetera, Et cetera..."
----- Original Message -----
From: "Diane Jensen Donald" <diane.j.donald@gmail.com>

> *waves scepter menacingly*
> Let it be written, let it be done.
>
> Diane

Diane, Queen of the Dance

Message 52798 · Diane Jensen Donald · 9 Jun 2008 18:36:08 · Top

*sighs* De-throned already, and all for being diplomatic. This could lead
us right down the rocky road to the folklore/folk dance debate again.

And I was going to knight that nice Jamie.

Diane

On Sat, Jun 7, 2008 at 9:40 AM, Thomas G. Mungall, III <atheling@cox.net>
wrote:

> "...Et cetera, Et cetera, Et cetera..."
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Diane Jensen Donald" <diane.j.donald@gmail.com>
>
> > *waves scepter menacingly*
> > Let it be written, let it be done.
> >
> > Diane
>
>

Diane, Queen of the Dance

Message 52799 · Thomas G. Mungall, III · 9 Jun 2008 18:41:03 · Top

Ha! I was just thinking I could shave my head and wear a Siamese costume and
you would wear a hoop skirt from the mid-Victorian era and we could dance
the dance in the "King & I". :-)

Shall We Dance?

Tom Mungall
Baton Rouge, La, USA

----- Original Message -----
From: "Diane Jensen Donald" <diane.j.donald@gmail.com>

> *sighs* De-throned already, and all for being diplomatic. This could
lead
> us right down the rocky road to the folklore/folk dance debate again.
>
> And I was going to knight that nice Jamie.
>
> Diane
>
> On Sat, Jun 7, 2008 at 9:40 AM, Thomas G. Mungall, III <atheling@cox.net>
> wrote:
>
> > "...Et cetera, Et cetera, Et cetera..."
> > ----- Original Message -----
> > From: "Diane Jensen Donald" <diane.j.donald@gmail.com>
> >
> > > *waves scepter menacingly*
> > > Let it be written, let it be done.
> > >
> > > Diane
> >
> >

Diane, Queen of the Dance

Message 52800 · Diane Jensen Donald · 9 Jun 2008 18:46:57 · Top

*grins* Tom, I would be honored. Besides, it might give that upstart son of
yours something to think about. I happen to think I dance very well in a
hoop skirt. :D

*hums shall we dance*

Diane Donald
Boise, Idaho USA

On Mon, Jun 9, 2008 at 10:41 AM, Thomas G. Mungall, III <atheling@cox.net>
wrote:

> Ha! I was just thinking I could shave my head and wear a Siamese costume
> and
> you would wear a hoop skirt from the mid-Victorian era and we could dance
> the dance in the "King & I". :-)
>
> Shall We Dance?
>
> Tom Mungall
> Baton Rouge, La, USA
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Diane Jensen Donald" <diane.j.donald@gmail.com>
>
>
> > *sighs* De-throned already, and all for being diplomatic. This could
> lead
> > us right down the rocky road to the folklore/folk dance debate again.
> >
> > And I was going to knight that nice Jamie.
> >
> > Diane
> >
> > On Sat, Jun 7, 2008 at 9:40 AM, Thomas G. Mungall, III <atheling@cox.net
> >
> > wrote:
> >
> > > "...Et cetera, Et cetera, Et cetera..."
> > > ----- Original Message -----
> > > From: "Diane Jensen Donald" <diane.j.donald@gmail.com>
> > >
> > > > *waves scepter menacingly*
> > > > Let it be written, let it be done.
> > > >
> > > > Diane
> > >
> > >
>
>

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