strathspey Archive: Breakish Postie

Previous thread: Linnea's Strathspey--recommmended music
Next thread: changing dance traditions (wasRe: Circles in palindromes (was RE: Ian Powrie's Farewell))

Breakish Postie

Message 52254 · Bruce Herbold · 29 Apr 2008 09:04:59 · Top

Well I taught this up and coming young dance tonight and it was a
substantial hit amongst the dancers. However, they were frustrated by
my lack of knowledge about what might make a Postie 'Breakish.' Any
wiser heads out there? (I am hoping for something more definitive
than my earlier questions about Letting teh Hackles Rise, but thanks
for the many and diversee thoughts on that theme)

Bruce Herbold
San Francisco

Breakish Postie

Message 52255 · Martin Sheffield · 29 Apr 2008 09:17:29 · Top

Le 29 avr. 08 à 09:04, Bruce Herbold a écrit :
> ...
> my lack of knowledge about what might make a Postie 'Breakish.'

You beat me to it, Bruce.
I have had the same question -- with the same lack of answer.

(We found the dance a bit static, however; pleasant but not exciting.
I've left it on the June holiday program nonetheless).

Martin

Breakish Postie

Message 52256 · Anselm Lingnau · 29 Apr 2008 09:20:37 · Top

Bruce Herbold wrote:

> Well I taught this up and coming young dance tonight and it was a
> substantial hit amongst the dancers. However, they were frustrated by
> my lack of knowledge about what might make a Postie 'Breakish.' Any
> wiser heads out there?

Breakish is a village on the Isle of Skye.

(It turns out that if the name of a dance sounds odd, it usually refers to a
place or a beverage. Think »Bedrule« or »Drambuie«.)

Anselm
--
Anselm Lingnau, Friedberg, Germany ..................... anselm@strathspey.org
There's an old story about the person who wished his computer were as easy to
use as his telephone. That wish has come true, since I no longer know how to
use my telephone. -- Bjarne Stroustrup

Breakish Postie

Message 52260 · Diane Jensen Donald · 29 Apr 2008 15:59:01 · Top

heehee... what a wonderful rule of thumb, Anselm!

Diane Donald
Boise, ID, USA

On 4/29/08, Anselm Lingnau <anselm@strathspey.org> wrote:
>
> Bruce Herbold wrote:
>
> > Well I taught this up and coming young dance tonight and it was a
> > substantial hit amongst the dancers. However, they were frustrated by
> > my lack of knowledge about what might make a Postie 'Breakish.' Any
> > wiser heads out there?
>
> Breakish is a village on the Isle of Skye.
>
> (It turns out that if the name of a dance sounds odd, it usually refers to
> a
> place or a beverage. Think »Bedrule« or »Drambuie«.)
>
> Anselm
> --
> Anselm Lingnau, Friedberg, Germany .....................
> anselm@strathspey.org
> There's an old story about the person who wished his computer were as easy
> to
> use as his telephone. That wish has come true, since I no longer know how
> to
> use my telephone. -- Bjarne
> Stroustrup
>

Breakish Postie

Message 52261 · Bruce Herbold · 29 Apr 2008 16:05:13 · Top

Thanks Anselm why I didn't reach for my trusty Google bar before
writing to the server is beyond me. Ooops.

Bruce Herbold
San Francisco

On Tue, Apr 29, 2008 at 12:20 AM, Anselm Lingnau <anselm@strathspey.org> wrote:
> Bruce Herbold wrote:
>
> > Well I taught this up and coming young dance tonight and it was a
> > substantial hit amongst the dancers. However, they were frustrated by
> > my lack of knowledge about what might make a Postie 'Breakish.' Any
> > wiser heads out there?
>
> Breakish is a village on the Isle of Skye.
>
> (It turns out that if the name of a dance sounds odd, it usually refers to a
> place or a beverage. Think »Bedrule« or »Drambuie«.)
>
> Anselm
> --
> Anselm Lingnau, Friedberg, Germany ..................... anselm@strathspey.org
> There's an old story about the person who wished his computer were as easy to
> use as his telephone. That wish has come true, since I no longer know how to
> use my telephone. -- Bjarne Stroustrup
>

Breakish Postie (who she is)

Message 52263 · Alasdair Graham · 29 Apr 2008 16:31:01 · Top

The original Book, sold by Isle of Skye Branch ( see
http://www.skyerscds.org.uk/), contains the following comment on this dance.

"Devised by Trevor Rayner, Isle of Skye Branch.
Dance and Music commissioned by Isle of Skye Branch in recognition of Morag
Gunnarsson's (The Breakish Postie) many years of teaching for the Branch. A
BIG THANK YOU."

This is one of the benefits gained by purchasing (or downloading) the
original dance instructions!!

Alasdair Graham
Dumbarton, Scotland

Looking for a dance?
Call up http://www.dancediary.info to see if something suits.
Ceilidh Dance Pages
Country Dance Page & Newsletter.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Anselm Lingnau" <anselm@strathspey.org>

Bruce Herbold wrote:

> Well I taught this up and coming young dance tonight and it was a
> substantial hit amongst the dancers. However, they were frustrated by
> my lack of knowledge about what might make a Postie 'Breakish.' Any
> wiser heads out there?

Breakish is a village on the Isle of Skye.

(It turns out that if the name of a dance sounds odd, it usually refers to a
place or a beverage. Think »Bedrule« or »Drambuie«.)

Anselm

Breakish Postie (who she is)

Message 52264 · Bruce Herbold · 29 Apr 2008 16:58:03 · Top

Even with the original directions, with the cute cartoon, those of us
less familiar with the Scottish Gazeteer can misinterpret a word as
tantalizingly misunderstandable as 'Breakish.' And I think for many
of us across the pond, we have to stop and remember that Morag is a
feminine name -- all of which was doubtless obvious to the Skye dance
community, but requires a little handholding for us slower types.
Thanks again Anselm, I've now done my Google homework and look forward
some day to visiting the beautiful Breakish.

Bruce

On Tue, Apr 29, 2008 at 7:31 AM, Alasdair Graham
<alasdair.graham@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote:
> The original Book, sold by Isle of Skye Branch ( see
> http://www.skyerscds.org.uk/), contains the following comment on this dance.
>
> "Devised by Trevor Rayner, Isle of Skye Branch.
> Dance and Music commissioned by Isle of Skye Branch in recognition of Morag
> Gunnarsson's (The Breakish Postie) many years of teaching for the Branch. A
> BIG THANK YOU."
>
> This is one of the benefits gained by purchasing (or downloading) the
> original dance instructions!!
>
> Alasdair Graham
> Dumbarton, Scotland
>
> Looking for a dance?
> Call up http://www.dancediary.info to see if something suits.
> Ceilidh Dance Pages
> Country Dance Page & Newsletter.
>
>
>
> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Anselm Lingnau" <anselm@strathspey.org>
>
>
> Bruce Herbold wrote:
>
>
> > Well I taught this up and coming young dance tonight and it was a
> > substantial hit amongst the dancers. However, they were frustrated by
> > my lack of knowledge about what might make a Postie 'Breakish.' Any
> > wiser heads out there?
> >
>
> Breakish is a village on the Isle of Skye.
>
> (It turns out that if the name of a dance sounds odd, it usually refers to
> a
> place or a beverage. Think »Bedrule« or »Drambuie«.)
>
> Anselm
>
>
>

Breakish Postie (who she is)

Message 52265 · Steve Wyrick · 29 Apr 2008 17:13:14 · Top

As a musician seeing this title on dance sets, and being unfamiliar
with the geography of the Isle of Skye (even if I'd known that this
dance came from there) I'd wondered about this myself. Thanks for the
enlightenment. Now out of curiosity, how is "Breakish" properly
pronounced? Thanks -Steve

On Tue, Apr 29, 2008 at 7:58 AM, Bruce Herbold <bherbold@gmail.com> wrote:
> Even with the original directions, with the cute cartoon, those of us
> less familiar with the Scottish Gazeteer can misinterpret a word as
> tantalizingly misunderstandable as 'Breakish.' And I think for many
> of us across the pond, we have to stop and remember that Morag is a
> feminine name -- all of which was doubtless obvious to the Skye dance
> community, but requires a little handholding for us slower types.
> Thanks again Anselm, I've now done my Google homework and look forward
> some day to visiting the beautiful Breakish.
>
> Bruce
>
> On Tue, Apr 29, 2008 at 7:31 AM, Alasdair Graham
> <alasdair.graham@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote:
> > The original Book, sold by Isle of Skye Branch ( see
> > http://www.skyerscds.org.uk/), contains the following comment on this dance.
> >
> > "Devised by Trevor Rayner, Isle of Skye Branch.
> > Dance and Music commissioned by Isle of Skye Branch in recognition of Morag
> > Gunnarsson's (The Breakish Postie) many years of teaching for the Branch. A
> > BIG THANK YOU."
> >
> > This is one of the benefits gained by purchasing (or downloading) the
> > original dance instructions!!
> >
> > Alasdair Graham
> > Dumbarton, Scotland
> >
> > Looking for a dance?
> > Call up http://www.dancediary.info to see if something suits.
> > Ceilidh Dance Pages
> > Country Dance Page & Newsletter.
> >
> >
> >
> > ----- Original Message ----- From: "Anselm Lingnau" <anselm@strathspey.org>
> >
> >
> > Bruce Herbold wrote:
> >
> >
> > > Well I taught this up and coming young dance tonight and it was a
> > > substantial hit amongst the dancers. However, they were frustrated by
> > > my lack of knowledge about what might make a Postie 'Breakish.' Any
> > > wiser heads out there?
> > >
> >
> > Breakish is a village on the Isle of Skye.
> >
> > (It turns out that if the name of a dance sounds odd, it usually refers to
> > a
> > place or a beverage. Think »Bedrule« or »Drambuie«.)
> >
> > Anselm
> >
> >
> >
>

--
Steve Wyrick -- Concord, California

"Popular Dances"

Message 52274 · campbell · 29 Apr 2008 21:25:55 · Top

I have now received enough dance programmes (apologies to our American
brethren for spelling) (87) for me to have a dance that has appeared 20
times, so it is time for me to publish the list again.

The last time I called the list "Popular Dances" but there were various
responses that challenged the title. So this time I will call it "The list
of dances that have appeared most often in programmes that have been
submitted to Campbell Tyler in response to his request that such be
submitted, rather than any he might have been able to find if he had but
trawled the internet or Strathspey Server itself". I trust this will
receive fewer challenges, though I am sure someone will find just cause or
impediment.

1 De'il Amang The Tailors - 20
2 Reel of the 51st Division - 18
2 Neidpath Castle
4 Maxwell's Rant - 15
4 Minister on the Loch
4 Mrs Stewart's Jig
4 Pelorus Jack
4 Irish Rover
9 Dream Catcher - 14
9 Shiftin Bobbins
9 Gang the Same Gate
12 Catch the Wind - 13
12 Montgomeries Rant
12 Bees of Maggieknockater
12 Sugar Candie
12 Reel of the Royal Scots
12 Hoopers Jig
12 Piper and the Penguin
19 Jubilee Jig - 12
19 Machine Without Horses
19 Gentleman
19 Wild Geese
19 Flowers of Edinburgh
24 MacDonald of the Isles - 11
24 Joie de Vivre
24 Polharrow Burn
24 Mairis Wedding
28 Monymusk - 10
28 Napiers Index
28 Bratach Bana
28 Luckenbooth Brooch
28 Seton's Ceilidh Band
33 The Nurseryman - 9
33 Ladies Fancy
33 General Stuart's Reel
33 Bridge of Nairn
33 St Andrews Fair
38 Butterscotch and Honey - 8
38 Rakes of Glasgow
38 Belle of Bon Accord
38 Ian Powries Farewell to Auchterarder
38 Miss Johnstone of Ardrossan
38 Clutha
38 Falls of Rogie
38 Round Reel of Eight
38 Festival Fling
38 White Heather Jig
38 John of Bon Accord
38 Quarries Jig
38 West's Hornpipe
38 EH3 7AF
38 Rose of the North
38 Duke of Perth
38 Robertson Rant
38 Tribute to the Borders
55 etc etc

In total I now have 507 dances on my list from the 87 programmes, of which
244 appear more than once, or put it another way, 263 (over half) only
appear once. Thanks to the 62 different event organisers in 11 different
countries who have submitted programmes. Further along the line I will have
enough data to make lists by continent credible and later by country. But
for now this is it. When the top dance reaches 30, I will publish the list
again.

Regards

Campbell Tyler
Cape Town

-----Original Message-----
From: strathspey-bounces-campbell=tyler.co.za@strathspey.org
[mailto:strathspey-bounces-campbell=tyler.co.za@strathspey.org] On Behalf Of
Bruce Herbold
Sent: 29 April 2008 04:58 PM
To: SCD news and discussion
Subject: Re: Breakish Postie (who she is)

Even with the original directions, with the cute cartoon, those of us
less familiar with the Scottish Gazeteer can misinterpret a word as
tantalizingly misunderstandable as 'Breakish.' And I think for many
of us across the pond, we have to stop and remember that Morag is a
feminine name -- all of which was doubtless obvious to the Skye dance
community, but requires a little handholding for us slower types.
Thanks again Anselm, I've now done my Google homework and look forward
some day to visiting the beautiful Breakish.

Bruce

On Tue, Apr 29, 2008 at 7:31 AM, Alasdair Graham
<alasdair.graham@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote:
> The original Book, sold by Isle of Skye Branch ( see
> http://www.skyerscds.org.uk/), contains the following comment on this
dance.
>
> "Devised by Trevor Rayner, Isle of Skye Branch.
> Dance and Music commissioned by Isle of Skye Branch in recognition of
Morag
> Gunnarsson's (The Breakish Postie) many years of teaching for the Branch.
A
> BIG THANK YOU."
>
> This is one of the benefits gained by purchasing (or downloading) the
> original dance instructions!!
>
> Alasdair Graham
> Dumbarton, Scotland
>
> Looking for a dance?
> Call up http://www.dancediary.info to see if something suits.
> Ceilidh Dance Pages
> Country Dance Page & Newsletter.
>
>
>
> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Anselm Lingnau"
<anselm@strathspey.org>
>
>
> Bruce Herbold wrote:
>
>
> > Well I taught this up and coming young dance tonight and it was a
> > substantial hit amongst the dancers. However, they were frustrated by
> > my lack of knowledge about what might make a Postie 'Breakish.' Any
> > wiser heads out there?
> >
>
> Breakish is a village on the Isle of Skye.
>
> (It turns out that if the name of a dance sounds odd, it usually refers
to
> a
> place or a beverage. Think >Bedrule< or >Drambuie<.)
>
> Anselm
>
>
>

"Popular Dances" [Spelling of Deil]

Message 52277 · Alasdair Graham · 30 Apr 2008 08:23:23 · Top

OK Campbell here is the first challenge.

Why the change of spelling for "Deil Amang the Tailors"?

There is no apostrophe in the spelling of the dance described in Book 14.
Could you be adding two different dances with similar names here?

Alasdair Graham
Dumbarton, Scotland.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Campbell Tyler" <campbell@tyler.co.za>

>I have now received enough dance programmes (apologies to our American
> brethren for spelling) (87) for me to have a dance that has appeared 20
> times, so it is time for me to publish the list again.
>
> The last time I called the list "Popular Dances" but there were various
> responses that challenged the title. So this time I will call it "The
> list
> of dances that have appeared most often in programmes that have been
> submitted to Campbell Tyler in response to his request that such be
> submitted, rather than any he might have been able to find if he had but
> trawled the internet or Strathspey Server itself". I trust this will
> receive fewer challenges, though I am sure someone will find just cause or
> impediment.
>
> 1 De'il Amang The Tailors - 20
> Regards
>
> Campbell Tyler
> Cape Town

"Popular Dances" [Spelling of Deil]

Message 52285 · George Meikle · 30 Apr 2008 10:37:21 · Top

Alasdair,

This is something I constantly come across in dance programmes received from
organisers of dances we play at. I have even seen some well known RSCDS
teachers spell it incorrectly. Another common error is that most folk miss
"The" off the beginning of the title.

George Meikle (Dunfermline)
Lothian Scottish Dance Band

-----------------------------

Alasdair Graham wrote:-

OK Campbell here is the first challenge.

Why the change of spelling for "Deil Amang the Tailors"?

There is no apostrophe in the spelling of the dance described in Book 14.
Could you be adding two different dances with similar names here?

"Popular Dances" [Spelling of Deil]

Message 52287 · campbell · 30 Apr 2008 10:56:04 · Top

Alasdair wrote:

>OK Campbell here is the first challenge.

>Why the change of spelling for "Deil Amang the Tailors"?

>There is no apostrophe in the spelling of the dance described in Book 14.
>Could you be adding two different dances with similar names here?

I am braced for all future challenges. I stand corrected if that is THE
correct way to describe it (and George now says that you have left off the
"The" at the beginning - come on Alasdair, get it right!!). However, just
about all programmes I receive have the apostrophe inserted. Perhaps I
should check back over the 20 and see if the Scottish ones are "correctly"
spelt. I do believe though that it is the same dance, no matter whether the
apostrophe is there or not. I did nearly add in Deil Amang the Gaynors, but
spotted the difference in time. That dance stands at 1 for now, as does
Linnea's Strathspey. It will be interesting to see whether the
unprecedented amount of air time this latter dance has received will work
through into the programmes.

Campbell Tyler
Cape Town

Leading "The" was Re: "Popular Dances" [Spelling of Deil]

Message 52289 · Alasdair Graham · 30 Apr 2008 11:18:35 · Top

The missing "The" has arisen as a result of indexing and database design
problems.
When searching for any particular dance you invariable get a "no trace" if
you include the leading "The" etc.
Most dance programs now do not include "the" in the name of a dance.
It does seem redundant to write it as "Deil Amang the Tailors, The".

Alasdair Graham
Dumbarton, Scotland.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Campbell Tyler"

I stand corrected if that is THE correct way to describe it (and George
now says that you have left off the
"The" at the beginning - come on Alasdair, get it right!!).

Leading "The" was Re: "Popular Dances" [Spelling of Deil]

Message 52290 · Andrew Smith · 30 Apr 2008 11:55:44 · Top

Here in Bristol we generally include the "The" when appropriate when
peblishing dance programmes, tickets etc.
Andrew Smith,
Bristol, UK.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Alasdair Graham" <alasdair.graham@blueyonder.co.uk>
To: "SCD news and discussion" <strathspey@strathspey.org>
Sent: Wednesday, April 30, 2008 10:18 AM
Subject: Leading "The" was Re: "Popular Dances" [Spelling of Deil]

> The missing "The" has arisen as a result of indexing and database design
> problems.
> When searching for any particular dance you invariable get a "no trace" if
> you include the leading "The" etc.
> Most dance programs now do not include "the" in the name of a dance.
> It does seem redundant to write it as "Deil Amang the Tailors, The".
>
> Alasdair Graham
> Dumbarton, Scotland.
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Campbell Tyler"
>
> I stand corrected if that is THE correct way to describe it (and George
> now says that you have left off the
> "The" at the beginning - come on Alasdair, get it right!!).
>
>

Leading "The" was Re: "Popular Dances" [Spelling of Deil]

Message 52291 · Anselm Lingnau · 30 Apr 2008 12:46:20 · Top

Alasdair Graham wrote:

> The missing "The" has arisen as a result of indexing and database design
> problems.
> When searching for any particular dance you invariable get a "no trace" if
> you include the leading "The" etc.
> Most dance programs now do not include "the" in the name of a dance.
> It does seem redundant to write it as "Deil Amang the Tailors, The".

DanceData does store names with leading articles such as »The« or »A« as »Reel
of the Royal Scots, The« or »Trip to Bavaria, A« -- but the Web front-end
takes pains to put these articles back to the front where they belong to make
things look nicer.

Prompted by Alasdair's complaint above, I have just now written and committed
a five-line change to the DanceData web front-end that, if a query for a
pattern such as »The Reel« does not turn up any results, the query is retried
as »Reel.*, The« (aficionados of »regular expressions« will note that this
matches any dance whose name starts with »Reel« and finishes with », The«).
So where, if you were to enter »The Deil« in the query box, up until ten
minutes ago you would have got no results at all, you will now get two. This
works for »The«, »A«, »Le«, »La«, and »Da« (for the Shetlanders among us),
and I am happy to entertain suggestions as to how this list might be made
more complete.

Incidentally, I'm always open to suggestions regarding improvements to
DanceData, especially if they can be implemented in ten minutes using five
lines of code (which of course is something I can only decide on the basis of
actually knowing about the suggestions first).

Also incidentally, if you're not sure about the apostrophe in »Deil«
versus »De'il«, try querying for »Deil|De'il«, where the vertical bar
separates the two alternatives. (If you're into regular expressions,
yes, »De'?il« should also work but for some reason jumps directly to a dance
called »XYZZY«. This will need looked into at some point. »De'*il« is fine
even though it would also match oddities like »De''''''il« which don't seem
to occur in real life, and »De'{0,1}« is fine, too, so the question mark is
probably the culprit somehow ...)

Anselm
--
Anselm Lingnau, Friedberg, Germany ..................... anselm@strathspey.org
Democracy is the recurrent suspicion that more than half of the people are
right more than half the time. -- E. B. White

Leading "The" was Re: "Popular Dances" [Spelling of Deil]

Message 52293 · Mike Briggs · 30 Apr 2008 14:32:36 · Top

Anselm, you might want to include "an" in your little list.

Mike (who, during the class he attended last Sunday, heard not only "Montgomeries' Rant" but "The Dalkeith's Strathspey."

+ + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + +
+ Mike and Norma Briggs +
+ 1519 Storytown Road +
+ Oregon WI 53711-1925 USA +
+ +1 608 835 0914 (voice) +1 608 835 0924 (fax) +
+ + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + +

----- Original Message ----
From: Anselm Lingnau <anselm@strathspey.org>
To: SCD news and discussion <strathspey@strathspey.org>
Sent: Wednesday, April 30, 2008 5:46:20 AM
Subject: Re: Leading "The" was Re: "Popular Dances" [Spelling of Deil]

Alasdair Graham wrote:

> The missing "The" has arisen as a result of indexing and database design
> problems.
> When searching for any particular dance you invariable get a "no trace" if
> you include the leading "The" etc.
> Most dance programs now do not include "the" in the name of a dance.
> It does seem redundant to write it as "Deil Amang the Tailors, The".

DanceData does store names with leading articles such as »The« or »A« as »Reel
of the Royal Scots, The« or »Trip to Bavaria, A« -- but the Web front-end
takes pains to put these articles back to the front where they belong to make
things look nicer.

Prompted by Alasdair's complaint above, I have just now written and committed
a five-line change to the DanceData web front-end that, if a query for a
pattern such as »The Reel« does not turn up any results, the query is retried
as »Reel.*, The« (aficionados of »regular expressions« will note that this
matches any dance whose name starts with »Reel« and finishes with », The«).
So where, if you were to enter »The Deil« in the query box, up until ten
minutes ago you would have got no results at all, you will now get two. This
works for »The«, »A«, »Le«, »La«, and »Da« (for the Shetlanders among us),
and I am happy to entertain suggestions as to how this list might be made
more complete.

Incidentally, I'm always open to suggestions regarding improvements to
DanceData, especially if they can be implemented in ten minutes using five
lines of code (which of course is something I can only decide on the basis of
actually knowing about the suggestions first).

Also incidentally, if you're not sure about the apostrophe in »Deil«
versus »De'il«, try querying for »Deil|De'il«, where the vertical bar
separates the two alternatives. (If you're into regular expressions,
yes, »De'?il« should also work but for some reason jumps directly to a dance
called »XYZZY«. This will need looked into at some point. »De'*il« is fine
even though it would also match oddities like »De''''''il« which don't seem
to occur in real life, and »De'{0,1}« is fine, too, so the question mark is
probably the culprit somehow ...)

Anselm
--
Anselm Lingnau, Friedberg, Germany ..................... anselm@strathspey.org
Democracy is the recurrent suspicion that more than half of the people are
right more than half the time. -- E. B. White

Leading "The" was Re: "Popular Dances" [Spelling of Deil]

Message 52296 · Anselm Lingnau · 30 Apr 2008 15:22:35 · Top

Mike Briggs wrote:

> Anselm, you might want to include "an" in your little list.

Makes sense. In fact it makes so much sense that, when I went into the file
just now to put it in, I found that it was already there :^) I just forgot to
quote it in the message. This is the sort of software upgrade I like the
most -- please send more suggestions like that.

> "The Dalkeith's Strathspey."

Well, The Dalkeith is presumably the chief of clan Dalkeith. Good for him ...
I think there's an RSCDS dance with a similar title named for a town near
Edinburgh.

Anselm
--
Anselm Lingnau, Friedberg, Germany ..................... anselm@strathspey.org
When you combine people and technology, you have a very powerful combination.
-- Tommy Hilfiger praises Microsoft (related by Daniel Lyons)

Leading "The" was Re: "Popular Dances" [Spelling of Deil]

Message 52299 · GOSS9@telefonica.net · 30 Apr 2008 15:59:30 · Top

OT, but might be worth someone´s research time

Many of the "festes" in Mallorca involve driving out the: devil,
dimoni, green man, Robin Goodfellow, Robin Hood, etc. However when it
comes to that of St Anthony, who comes in chains lead by the "dimoni!"
the standard music is "El dimoni entre ells sastres". Note that the
"El" here has nothing to do with the "the" in Deil ..., since we put in
articles in all sorts of places and non consistantly. When it comes to
who borrowed from, my vote would be for the U.K. (generalloy as opposed
to Scotland, as the tune is also common to Ireland, England, and the U.
S.). I say this because for our dancing and tradition is is almost
impossible to dance to and the rhythm is more U.S. country western then
Scottish. Besides, we have no literature connection dimons and tailors
(sastres).

Regarding the other topic, to expand the issue, there is also the
"Deil" spelling for the surname "Dalzeal".

Leading "The" was Re: "Popular Dances" [Spelling of Deil]

Message 52302 · GOSS9@telefonica.net · 30 Apr 2008 16:03:39 · Top

The idea of omitting the articles seems to be relatively modern in
traditional music terms, if you check such collections as those of
Playford, the Gows, Glen, and others you will have to check many tunes
twice as the "the" ones are often under "t" in the collating sequence.
Making it worse, many of these did not bother to alphabetize beyone the
first letters, so while all the "the" tunes are in the same place, they
are often not in alphabetical order after the "the".

Leading "The" was Re: "Popular Dances" [Spelling of Deil]

Message 52308 · Andrew Smith · 30 Apr 2008 18:35:46 · Top

I cannot remember where I read or heard it, but it was in connection with
clan chiefs being referred to as Anselm has wrt Dalkeith, and was correcting
the misuse to the effect that, "There are only three "The"s in Scotland -
The Devil, The Pope and The Chisholm".
I do not think that there is a Clan Dalkeith, but there once was a James
Douglas of Dalkeith, apparently, who became Earl of Morton in 1401, who
might have been 'Dalkeith' to his friends.
Andrew Smith,
Bristol, UK.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Anselm Lingnau" <anselm@strathspey.org>
To: "SCD news and discussion" <strathspey@strathspey.org>
Sent: Wednesday, April 30, 2008 2:22 PM
Subject: Re: Leading "The" was Re: "Popular Dances" [Spelling of Deil]

> Mike Briggs wrote:
>
>> Anselm, you might want to include "an" in your little list.
>
> Makes sense. In fact it makes so much sense that, when I went into the
> file
> just now to put it in, I found that it was already there :^) I just forgot
> to
> quote it in the message. This is the sort of software upgrade I like the
> most -- please send more suggestions like that.
>
>> "The Dalkeith's Strathspey."
>
> Well, The Dalkeith is presumably the chief of clan Dalkeith. Good for him
> ...
> I think there's an RSCDS dance with a similar title named for a town near
> Edinburgh.
>
> Anselm
> --
> Anselm Lingnau, Friedberg, Germany .....................
> anselm@strathspey.org
> When you combine people and technology, you have a very powerful
> combination.
> -- Tommy Hilfiger praises Microsoft (related by Daniel
> Lyons)
>

Leading "The" was Re: "Popular Dances" [Spelling of Deil]

Message 52312 · Anselm Lingnau · 30 Apr 2008 23:10:32 · Top

Andrew Smith wrote:

> I do not think that there is a Clan Dalkeith, but there once was a James
> Douglas of Dalkeith, apparently, who became Earl of Morton in 1401, who
> might have been 'Dalkeith' to his friends.

AFAIK titled gentry use whatever they're the <insert title here> of to sign
their names. For example, So-and-so the 24th Duke of Wherever would sign his
official correspondence »Wherever«, not »So-and-so« nor »Duke of Wherever«.
(Good old Jimmy Douglas, post-1401, would probably have used »Morton«.)

Anselm

Disclaimer: I am writing this from Germany, where the nobility was abolished
by law in 1919, so what do I know?
--
Anselm Lingnau, Friedberg, Germany ..................... anselm@strathspey.org
There is no idea so bad that it cannot be made to look brilliant with the
proper application of fonts and color.
-- Scott Adams, _Dilbert's Guide to the Rest of your Life_

Leading "The" was Re: "Popular Dances" [Spelling of Deil]

Message 52318 · GOSS9@telefonica.net · 1 May 2008 00:33:12 · Top

To Anselm, while not so in Scotland, Wales was used to refer to the
young prince at St Andrews, I have a related question. What about
German bishops, Lutheran and RC. In Scotland, the local Scottish
episcopal bishop, signs his name "St Andrews", of course this along
with York, could be ambiguous because there is also an Earl of St
Andrews, and both a duke and archbishop of York.

Actually the nobility was not abolished, just the rights associated
with the titles, which themselves live on.

Leading "The" was Re: "Popular Dances" [Spelling of Deil]

Message 52321 · GOSS9@telefonica.net · 1 May 2008 01:45:04 · Top

Assuming you are being serious, the "the" in dances is the article
indicating not the name of the dance, but the dance itself, as in "the
... rant/reel/jig/strathspey/hornpipe/dance/etc. The use of last name,
locative, title, in place of christian and/or surname, or the, is
common in Scotland. So is one said "Pope" with out "the" (meaning the
unique one), one would default to the literary one, lacking further
context.

Names

Message 52328 · ron.mackey · 1 May 2008 11:27:33 · Top

> To Anselm, while not so in Scotland, Wales was used to refer to the
> young prince at St Andrews, I have a related question. What about
> German bishops, Lutheran and RC. In Scotland, the local Scottish
> episcopal bishop, signs his name "St Andrews", of course this along
> with York, could be ambiguous because there is also an Earl of St
> Andrews, and both a duke and archbishop of York.
>
> Actually the nobility was not abolished, just the rights associated
> with the titles, which themselves live on.

I understand that Bishops follow their name with a +?
Ron

Names

Message 52329 · GOSS9@telefonica.net · 1 May 2008 13:13:52 · Top

Aware of the "cross" in the case of St Andrews and other Scottish
bishops, but how does one articulate this symbol. In English history
one often, in a religious context simply says "York" or "Canterbury"
when referring to the archbishops and their acts.
In the case of Canterbury, one says either "Canterbury (or Lambeth)
says ...", Just as for RC´s one says "Rome, or the Vatican, says ...".

Names

Message 52333 · Andrew Smith · 1 May 2008 14:23:07 · Top

While it is not how the name will be articulated, the current Archbishop of
Canterbury will sign himself as 'Rowan Cantuar', rather than Canterbury +,
so in the C of E at least, according to Whitaker's Almanac, it is their
first name followed by that of their Diocese, which latter may be expressed
in Latin or English. It appears that which language is used depends on the
antiquity of the diocese.
Similarly, I think that I have heard that 'Episcopi' might be said where
there is a chance of confusion with a lay locative title.
Maybe I should just mention 'The Minister on the Loch' just to satisfy the
dancers, even though he is skating.
Andrew Smith,
Bristol, UK.
----- Original Message -----
From: <GOSS9@telefonica.net>
To: <strathspey@strathspey.org>
Sent: Thursday, May 01, 2008 12:13 PM
Subject: Re: Names

Aware of the "cross" in the case of St Andrews and other Scottish
bishops, but how does one articulate this symbol. In English history
one often, in a religious context simply says "York" or "Canterbury"
when referring to the archbishops and their acts.
In the case of Canterbury, one says either "Canterbury (or Lambeth)
says ...", Just as for RC´s one says "Rome, or the Vatican, says ...".

Leading "The" was Re: "Popular Dances" [Spelling of Deil]

Message 52338 · Alan Paterson · 2 May 2008 14:48:40 · Top

On 30/04/2008 11:18, Alasdair Graham wrote:
> The missing "The" has arisen as a result of indexing and database design
> problems.
> When searching for any particular dance you invariable get a "no trace"
> if you include the leading "The" etc.
> Most dance programs now do not include "the" in the name of a dance.
> It does seem redundant to write it as "Deil Amang the Tailors, The".

Dancedata indexes it as "Deil Amang the Tailors, The" and display it as
"The Deil Amang the Tailors". Similarly with the prefix words "A", "An",
"La", and a few more.

Alan (professional database designer)

Breakish Postie (who she is)

Message 52283 · Marian Stroh · 30 Apr 2008 01:36:35 · Top

With all the talk about the Breakish Postie, Would someone be willing to
send me the directions privately? It sounds like something we'd like to
try. Thanks.

Marian Stroh, Reno, Nevada
mstrohinreno@charter.net

Breakish Postie (who she is)

Message 52288 · Iain Boyd · 29 Apr 2008 23:51:04 · Top

Dear Bruce,

Where in the US is Morag a non-feminine name?

Regards,

Iain Boyd
(from way down south where Morag has always been a feminine name)


Bruce Herbold <bherbold@gmail.com> wrote:
Even with the original directions, with the cute cartoon, those of us
less familiar with the Scottish Gazeteer can misinterpret a word as
tantalizingly misunderstandable as 'Breakish.' And I think for many
of us across the pond, we have to stop and remember that Morag is a
feminine name -- all of which was doubtless obvious to the Skye dance
community, but requires a little handholding for us slower types.
Thanks again Anselm, I've now done my Google homework and look forward
some day to visiting the beautiful Breakish.

Bruce

On Tue, Apr 29, 2008 at 7:31 AM, Alasdair Graham
wrote:
> The original Book, sold by Isle of Skye Branch ( see
> http://www.skyerscds.org.uk/), contains the following comment on this dance.
>
> "Devised by Trevor Rayner, Isle of Skye Branch.
> Dance and Music commissioned by Isle of Skye Branch in recognition of Morag
> Gunnarsson's (The Breakish Postie) many years of teaching for the Branch. A
> BIG THANK YOU."
>
> This is one of the benefits gained by purchasing (or downloading) the
> original dance instructions!!
>
> Alasdair Graham
> Dumbarton, Scotland
>
> Looking for a dance?
> Call up http://www.dancediary.info to see if something suits.
> Ceilidh Dance Pages
> Country Dance Page & Newsletter.
>
>
>
> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Anselm Lingnau"
>
>
> Bruce Herbold wrote:
>
>
> > Well I taught this up and coming young dance tonight and it was a
> > substantial hit amongst the dancers. However, they were frustrated by
> > my lack of knowledge about what might make a Postie 'Breakish.' Any
> > wiser heads out there?
> >
>
> Breakish is a village on the Isle of Skye.
>
> (It turns out that if the name of a dance sounds odd, it usually refers to
> a
> place or a beverage. Think »Bedrule« or »Drambuie«.)
>
> Anselm
>
>
>

Send instant messages to your online friends http://au.messenger.yahoo.com

Breakish Postie (who she is)

Message 52294 · Mike Briggs · 30 Apr 2008 14:42:42 · Top

Not wishing to answer for Bruce (who is completely capable of doing that himself), but I think he may have meant that "Morag" is such an uncommon name in the U.S. that it doesn't immediately register to the average American that it is feminine, not that there actually are guys named Morag in this country (cf. guys named Sue).

And it wouldn't surprise me if there were. Over the years I've gotten used to guys named Evelyn, Hilary, Marion and Dana. And I've heard of women named Dana and Charlie. But (to bring this back more or less to topic) I never met a guy named Mairi.

Miked

+ + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + +
+ Mike and Norma Briggs +
+ 1519 Storytown Road +
+ Oregon WI 53711-1925 USA +
+ +1 608 835 0914 (voice) +1 608 835 0924 (fax) +
+ + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + +

----- Original Message ----
From: Iain Boyd <iain_boyd_scd@yahoo.co.nz>
To: SCD news and discussion <strathspey@strathspey.org>
Sent: Tuesday, April 29, 2008 4:51:04 PM
Subject: Re: Breakish Postie (who she is)

Dear Bruce,

Where in the US is Morag a non-feminine name?

Regards,

Iain Boyd
(from way down south where Morag has always been a feminine name)


Bruce Herbold <bherbold@gmail.com> wrote:
Even with the original directions, with the cute cartoon, those of us
less familiar with the Scottish Gazeteer can misinterpret a word as
tantalizingly misunderstandable as 'Breakish.' And I think for many
of us across the pond, we have to stop and remember that Morag is a
feminine name -- all of which was doubtless obvious to the Skye dance
community, but requires a little handholding for us slower types.
Thanks again Anselm, I've now done my Google homework and look forward
some day to visiting the beautiful Breakish.

Bruce

On Tue, Apr 29, 2008 at 7:31 AM, Alasdair Graham
wrote:
> The original Book, sold by Isle of Skye Branch ( see
> http://www.skyerscds.org.uk/), contains the following comment on this dance.
>
> "Devised by Trevor Rayner, Isle of Skye Branch.
> Dance and Music commissioned by Isle of Skye Branch in recognition of Morag
> Gunnarsson's (The Breakish Postie) many years of teaching for the Branch. A
> BIG THANK YOU."
>
> This is one of the benefits gained by purchasing (or downloading) the
> original dance instructions!!
>
> Alasdair Graham
> Dumbarton, Scotland
>
> Looking for a dance?
> Call up http://www.dancediary.info to see if something suits.
> Ceilidh Dance Pages
> Country Dance Page & Newsletter.
>
>
>
> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Anselm Lingnau"
>
>
> Bruce Herbold wrote:
>
>
> > Well I taught this up and coming young dance tonight and it was a
> > substantial hit amongst the dancers. However, they were frustrated by
> > my lack of knowledge about what might make a Postie 'Breakish.' Any
> > wiser heads out there?
> >
>
> Breakish is a village on the Isle of Skye.
>
> (It turns out that if the name of a dance sounds odd, it usually refers to
> a
> place or a beverage. Think »Bedrule« or »Drambuie«.)
>
> Anselm
>
>
>

Send instant messages to your online friends http://au.messenger.yahoo.com

Breakish Postie (who she is)

Message 52313 · Diane Jensen Donald · 30 Apr 2008 23:37:09 · Top

Just to throw an OT spanner in the works, my sister's name is Ainsley, which
my mother heard and thought was lovely. She had no idea it was a fairly
well-known man's name in the UK. At least it's unique!

Diane Donald
Boise, Idaho, USA

On Wed, Apr 30, 2008 at 6:42 AM, Norma or Mike Briggs <briggslaw@yahoo.com>
wrote:

> Not wishing to answer for Bruce (who is completely capable of doing that
> himself), but I think he may have meant that "Morag" is such an uncommon
> name in the U.S. that it doesn't immediately register to the average
> American that it is feminine, not that there actually are guys named Morag
> in this country (cf. guys named Sue).
>
> And it wouldn't surprise me if there were. Over the years I've gotten
> used to guys named Evelyn, Hilary, Marion and Dana. And I've heard of women
> named Dana and Charlie. But (to bring this back more or less to topic) I
> never met a guy named Mairi.
>
> Miked
>
> + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + +
> + Mike and Norma Briggs +
> + 1519 Storytown Road +
> + Oregon WI 53711-1925 USA +
> + +1 608 835 0914 (voice) +1 608 835 0924 (fax) +
> + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + +
>
>
>
> ----- Original Message ----
> From: Iain Boyd <iain_boyd_scd@yahoo.co.nz>
> To: SCD news and discussion <strathspey@strathspey.org>
> Sent: Tuesday, April 29, 2008 4:51:04 PM
> Subject: Re: Breakish Postie (who she is)
>
> Dear Bruce,
>
> Where in the US is Morag a non-feminine name?
>
> Regards,
>
> Iain Boyd
> (from way down south where Morag has always been a feminine name)
>
>
>
> Bruce Herbold <bherbold@gmail.com> wrote:
> Even with the original directions, with the cute cartoon, those of us
> less familiar with the Scottish Gazeteer can misinterpret a word as
> tantalizingly misunderstandable as 'Breakish.' And I think for many
> of us across the pond, we have to stop and remember that Morag is a
> feminine name -- all of which was doubtless obvious to the Skye dance
> community, but requires a little handholding for us slower types.
> Thanks again Anselm, I've now done my Google homework and look forward
> some day to visiting the beautiful Breakish.
>
> Bruce
>
> On Tue, Apr 29, 2008 at 7:31 AM, Alasdair Graham
> wrote:
> > The original Book, sold by Isle of Skye Branch ( see
> > http://www.skyerscds.org.uk/), contains the following comment on this
> dance.
> >
> > "Devised by Trevor Rayner, Isle of Skye Branch.
> > Dance and Music commissioned by Isle of Skye Branch in recognition of
> Morag
> > Gunnarsson's (The Breakish Postie) many years of teaching for the
> Branch. A
> > BIG THANK YOU."
> >
> > This is one of the benefits gained by purchasing (or downloading) the
> > original dance instructions!!
> >
> > Alasdair Graham
> > Dumbarton, Scotland
> >
> > Looking for a dance?
> > Call up http://www.dancediary.info to see if something suits.
> > Ceilidh Dance Pages
> > Country Dance Page & Newsletter.
> >
> >
> >
> > ----- Original Message ----- From: "Anselm Lingnau"
> >
> >
> > Bruce Herbold wrote:
> >
> >
> > > Well I taught this up and coming young dance tonight and it was a
> > > substantial hit amongst the dancers. However, they were frustrated by
> > > my lack of knowledge about what might make a Postie 'Breakish.' Any
> > > wiser heads out there?
> > >
> >
> > Breakish is a village on the Isle of Skye.
> >
> > (It turns out that if the name of a dance sounds odd, it usually refers
> to
> > a
> > place or a beverage. Think »Bedrule« or »Drambuie«.)
> >
> > Anselm
> >
> >
> >
>
>
> Send instant messages to your online friends http://au.messenger.yahoo.com
>

Breakish Postie (who she is)

Message 52315 · Bruce Herbold · 30 Apr 2008 23:51:06 · Top

And just for the other view -- when I was in Scotland no one believed
that Bruce was my first name -- I was Mr. Bruce no matter what I did.
Maybe I should have capilaized on it and been known as 'The Bruce'
But that was already taken.

Bruce Herbold
San Francisco

Who has taken a new hobby of trying to tie threads together --

(and thanks Mike your response took the words out of my mouth and made
them more coherent. I had written an email response but saw yours
before hitting send.)

On 4/30/08, Diane Jensen Donald <diane.j.donald@gmail.com> wrote:
> Just to throw an OT spanner in the works, my sister's name is Ainsley, which
> my mother heard and thought was lovely. She had no idea it was a fairly
> well-known man's name in the UK. At least it's unique!
>
> Diane Donald
> Boise, Idaho, USA
>
> On Wed, Apr 30, 2008 at 6:42 AM, Norma or Mike Briggs <briggslaw@yahoo.com>
> wrote:
>
> > Not wishing to answer for Bruce (who is completely capable of doing that
> > himself), but I think he may have meant that "Morag" is such an uncommon
> > name in the U.S. that it doesn't immediately register to the average
> > American that it is feminine, not that there actually are guys named Morag
> > in this country (cf. guys named Sue).
> >
> > And it wouldn't surprise me if there were. Over the years I've gotten
> > used to guys named Evelyn, Hilary, Marion and Dana. And I've heard of women
> > named Dana and Charlie. But (to bring this back more or less to topic) I
> > never met a guy named Mairi.
> >
> > Miked
> >
> > + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + +
> > + Mike and Norma Briggs +
> > + 1519 Storytown Road +
> > + Oregon WI 53711-1925 USA +
> > + +1 608 835 0914 (voice) +1 608 835 0924 (fax) +
> > + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + +
> >
> >
> >
> > ----- Original Message ----
> > From: Iain Boyd <iain_boyd_scd@yahoo.co.nz>
> > To: SCD news and discussion <strathspey@strathspey.org>
> > Sent: Tuesday, April 29, 2008 4:51:04 PM
> > Subject: Re: Breakish Postie (who she is)
> >
> > Dear Bruce,
> >
> > Where in the US is Morag a non-feminine name?
> >
> > Regards,
> >
> > Iain Boyd
> > (from way down south where Morag has always been a feminine name)
> >
> >
> >
> > Bruce Herbold <bherbold@gmail.com> wrote:
> > Even with the original directions, with the cute cartoon, those of us
> > less familiar with the Scottish Gazeteer can misinterpret a word as
> > tantalizingly misunderstandable as 'Breakish.' And I think for many
> > of us across the pond, we have to stop and remember that Morag is a
> > feminine name -- all of which was doubtless obvious to the Skye dance
> > community, but requires a little handholding for us slower types.
> > Thanks again Anselm, I've now done my Google homework and look forward
> > some day to visiting the beautiful Breakish.
> >
> > Bruce
> >
> > On Tue, Apr 29, 2008 at 7:31 AM, Alasdair Graham
> > wrote:
> > > The original Book, sold by Isle of Skye Branch ( see
> > > http://www.skyerscds.org.uk/), contains the following comment on this
> > dance.
> > >
> > > "Devised by Trevor Rayner, Isle of Skye Branch.
> > > Dance and Music commissioned by Isle of Skye Branch in recognition of
> > Morag
> > > Gunnarsson's (The Breakish Postie) many years of teaching for the
> > Branch. A
> > > BIG THANK YOU."
> > >
> > > This is one of the benefits gained by purchasing (or downloading) the
> > > original dance instructions!!
> > >
> > > Alasdair Graham
> > > Dumbarton, Scotland
> > >
> > > Looking for a dance?
> > > Call up http://www.dancediary.info to see if something suits.
> > > Ceilidh Dance Pages
> > > Country Dance Page & Newsletter.
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > ----- Original Message ----- From: "Anselm Lingnau"
> > >
> > >
> > > Bruce Herbold wrote:
> > >
> > >
> > > > Well I taught this up and coming young dance tonight and it was a
> > > > substantial hit amongst the dancers. However, they were frustrated by
> > > > my lack of knowledge about what might make a Postie 'Breakish.' Any
> > > > wiser heads out there?
> > > >
> > >
> > > Breakish is a village on the Isle of Skye.
> > >
> > > (It turns out that if the name of a dance sounds odd, it usually refers
> > to
> > > a
> > > place or a beverage. Think »Bedrule« or »Drambuie«.)
> > >
> > > Anselm
> > >
> > >
> > >
> >
> >
> > Send instant messages to your online friends http://au.messenger.yahoo.com
> >
>

Breakish Postie (who she is)

Message 52316 · Diane Jensen Donald · 30 Apr 2008 23:56:58 · Top

Heehee... I'll remember that, Mr. Bruce. A gentleman of your ilk could
easily pull off "The Bruce" though. I'd say go for it.

Diane Donald
Boise, Idaho, USA

On Wed, Apr 30, 2008 at 3:51 PM, Bruce Herbold <bherbold@gmail.com> wrote:

> And just for the other view -- when I was in Scotland no one believed
> that Bruce was my first name -- I was Mr. Bruce no matter what I did.
> Maybe I should have capilaized on it and been known as 'The Bruce'
> But that was already taken.
>
> Bruce Herbold
> San Francisco
>
> Who has taken a new hobby of trying to tie threads together --
>
> (and thanks Mike your response took the words out of my mouth and made
> them more coherent. I had written an email response but saw yours
> before hitting send.)
>
> On 4/30/08, Diane Jensen Donald <diane.j.donald@gmail.com> wrote:
> > Just to throw an OT spanner in the works, my sister's name is Ainsley,
> which
> > my mother heard and thought was lovely. She had no idea it was a fairly
> > well-known man's name in the UK. At least it's unique!
> >
> > Diane Donald
> > Boise, Idaho, USA
> >
> > On Wed, Apr 30, 2008 at 6:42 AM, Norma or Mike Briggs <
> briggslaw@yahoo.com>
> > wrote:
> >
> > > Not wishing to answer for Bruce (who is completely capable of doing
> that
> > > himself), but I think he may have meant that "Morag" is such an
> uncommon
> > > name in the U.S. that it doesn't immediately register to the average
> > > American that it is feminine, not that there actually are guys named
> Morag
> > > in this country (cf. guys named Sue).
> > >
> > > And it wouldn't surprise me if there were. Over the years I've gotten
> > > used to guys named Evelyn, Hilary, Marion and Dana. And I've heard of
> women
> > > named Dana and Charlie. But (to bring this back more or less to
> topic) I
> > > never met a guy named Mairi.
> > >
> > > Miked
> > >
> > > + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + +
> > > + Mike and Norma Briggs +
> > > + 1519 Storytown Road +
> > > + Oregon WI 53711-1925 USA +
> > > + +1 608 835 0914 (voice) +1 608 835 0924 (fax) +
> > > + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + +
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > ----- Original Message ----
> > > From: Iain Boyd <iain_boyd_scd@yahoo.co.nz>
> > > To: SCD news and discussion <strathspey@strathspey.org>
> > > Sent: Tuesday, April 29, 2008 4:51:04 PM
> > > Subject: Re: Breakish Postie (who she is)
> > >
> > > Dear Bruce,
> > >
> > > Where in the US is Morag a non-feminine name?
> > >
> > > Regards,
> > >
> > > Iain Boyd
> > > (from way down south where Morag has always been a feminine name)
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > Bruce Herbold <bherbold@gmail.com> wrote:
> > > Even with the original directions, with the cute cartoon, those of us
> > > less familiar with the Scottish Gazeteer can misinterpret a word as
> > > tantalizingly misunderstandable as 'Breakish.' And I think for many
> > > of us across the pond, we have to stop and remember that Morag is a
> > > feminine name -- all of which was doubtless obvious to the Skye dance
> > > community, but requires a little handholding for us slower types.
> > > Thanks again Anselm, I've now done my Google homework and look forward
> > > some day to visiting the beautiful Breakish.
> > >
> > > Bruce
> > >
> > > On Tue, Apr 29, 2008 at 7:31 AM, Alasdair Graham
> > > wrote:
> > > > The original Book, sold by Isle of Skye Branch ( see
> > > > http://www.skyerscds.org.uk/), contains the following comment on
> this
> > > dance.
> > > >
> > > > "Devised by Trevor Rayner, Isle of Skye Branch.
> > > > Dance and Music commissioned by Isle of Skye Branch in recognition
> of
> > > Morag
> > > > Gunnarsson's (The Breakish Postie) many years of teaching for the
> > > Branch. A
> > > > BIG THANK YOU."
> > > >
> > > > This is one of the benefits gained by purchasing (or downloading)
> the
> > > > original dance instructions!!
> > > >
> > > > Alasdair Graham
> > > > Dumbarton, Scotland
> > > >
> > > > Looking for a dance?
> > > > Call up http://www.dancediary.info to see if something suits.
> > > > Ceilidh Dance Pages
> > > > Country Dance Page & Newsletter.
> > > >
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > ----- Original Message ----- From: "Anselm Lingnau"
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > Bruce Herbold wrote:
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > > Well I taught this up and coming young dance tonight and it was a
> > > > > substantial hit amongst the dancers. However, they were frustrated
> by
> > > > > my lack of knowledge about what might make a Postie 'Breakish.'
> Any
> > > > > wiser heads out there?
> > > > >
> > > >
> > > > Breakish is a village on the Isle of Skye.
> > > >
> > > > (It turns out that if the name of a dance sounds odd, it usually
> refers
> > > to
> > > > a
> > > > place or a beverage. Think »Bedrule« or »Drambuie«.)
> > > >
> > > > Anselm
> > > >
> > > >
> > > >
> > >
> > >
> > > Send instant messages to your online friends
> http://au.messenger.yahoo.com
> > >
> >
>

Breakish Postie (who she is)

Message 52327 · Pia Walker · 1 May 2008 09:39:36 · Top

Well you did have a song about a boy called Sue also :>)

Pia

-----Original Message-----
From: strathspey-bounces-pia=intamail.com@strathspey.org
[mailto:strathspey-bounces-pia=intamail.com@strathspey.org]On Behalf Of
Diane Jensen Donald
Sent: 30 April 2008 22:37
To: SCD news and discussion
Subject: Re: Breakish Postie (who she is)

Just to throw an OT spanner in the works, my sister's name is Ainsley, which
my mother heard and thought was lovely. She had no idea it was a fairly
well-known man's name in the UK. At least it's unique!

Diane Donald
Boise, Idaho, USA

On Wed, Apr 30, 2008 at 6:42 AM, Norma or Mike Briggs <briggslaw@yahoo.com>
wrote:

> Not wishing to answer for Bruce (who is completely capable of doing that
> himself), but I think he may have meant that "Morag" is such an uncommon
> name in the U.S. that it doesn't immediately register to the average
> American that it is feminine, not that there actually are guys named Morag
> in this country (cf. guys named Sue).
>
> And it wouldn't surprise me if there were. Over the years I've gotten
> used to guys named Evelyn, Hilary, Marion and Dana. And I've heard of
women
> named Dana and Charlie. But (to bring this back more or less to topic) I
> never met a guy named Mairi.
>
> Miked
>
> + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + +
> + Mike and Norma Briggs +
> + 1519 Storytown Road +
> + Oregon WI 53711-1925 USA +
> + +1 608 835 0914 (voice) +1 608 835 0924 (fax) +
> + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + +
>
>
>
> ----- Original Message ----
> From: Iain Boyd <iain_boyd_scd@yahoo.co.nz>
> To: SCD news and discussion <strathspey@strathspey.org>
> Sent: Tuesday, April 29, 2008 4:51:04 PM
> Subject: Re: Breakish Postie (who she is)
>
> Dear Bruce,
>
> Where in the US is Morag a non-feminine name?
>
> Regards,
>
> Iain Boyd
> (from way down south where Morag has always been a feminine name)
>
>
>
> Bruce Herbold <bherbold@gmail.com> wrote:
> Even with the original directions, with the cute cartoon, those of us
> less familiar with the Scottish Gazeteer can misinterpret a word as
> tantalizingly misunderstandable as 'Breakish.' And I think for many
> of us across the pond, we have to stop and remember that Morag is a
> feminine name -- all of which was doubtless obvious to the Skye dance
> community, but requires a little handholding for us slower types.
> Thanks again Anselm, I've now done my Google homework and look forward
> some day to visiting the beautiful Breakish.
>
> Bruce
>
> On Tue, Apr 29, 2008 at 7:31 AM, Alasdair Graham
> wrote:
> > The original Book, sold by Isle of Skye Branch ( see
> > http://www.skyerscds.org.uk/), contains the following comment on this
> dance.
> >
> > "Devised by Trevor Rayner, Isle of Skye Branch.
> > Dance and Music commissioned by Isle of Skye Branch in recognition of
> Morag
> > Gunnarsson's (The Breakish Postie) many years of teaching for the
> Branch. A
> > BIG THANK YOU."
> >
> > This is one of the benefits gained by purchasing (or downloading) the
> > original dance instructions!!
> >
> > Alasdair Graham
> > Dumbarton, Scotland
> >
> > Looking for a dance?
> > Call up http://www.dancediary.info to see if something suits.
> > Ceilidh Dance Pages
> > Country Dance Page & Newsletter.
> >
> >
> >
> > ----- Original Message ----- From: "Anselm Lingnau"
> >
> >
> > Bruce Herbold wrote:
> >
> >
> > > Well I taught this up and coming young dance tonight and it was a
> > > substantial hit amongst the dancers. However, they were frustrated by
> > > my lack of knowledge about what might make a Postie 'Breakish.' Any
> > > wiser heads out there?
> > >
> >
> > Breakish is a village on the Isle of Skye.
> >
> > (It turns out that if the name of a dance sounds odd, it usually refers
> to
> > a
> > place or a beverage. Think "Bedrule" or "Drambuie".)
> >
> > Anselm
> >
> >
> >
>
>
> Send instant messages to your online friends http://au.messenger.yahoo.com
>

No virus found in this incoming message.
Checked by AVG.
Version: 7.5.524 / Virus Database: 269.23.6/1402 - Release Date: 28/04/2008
13:29

No virus found in this outgoing message.
Checked by AVG.
Version: 7.5.524 / Virus Database: 269.23.6/1402 - Release Date: 28/04/2008
13:29

OT Hilary (male/female names)

Message 52326 · ninian-uk · 1 May 2008 08:36:00 · Top

Mike,

Hilary is - or was originally - a Man's name. Boys were christened for St
Hilary, bishop of Poitiers (AD315-368). A quick look in the Ramsgate Abbey
book of saints lists 13 saints (all male) called Hilary, 2 called Hilarion
and 2 called Hilarinus.

The female form of the name seems to be Hilaria (3 saints).

Some of the people I knew called Hilary were born at the time Sir Edmund
Hilary conquered Everest, which probably accounts for it being most likely
to be the name of people now in their 50's.

David
D N R J Bowd-Exworth
80, Lantern Close, Berkeley, Gloucestershire GL13 9DE
Tel: +44 (0)1453 819011
----- Original Message -----
From: "Norma or Mike Briggs" <briggslaw@yahoo.com>
To: "SCD news and discussion" <strathspey@strathspey.org>
Sent: Wednesday, April 30, 2008 1:42 PM
Subject: Re: Breakish Postie (who she is)

Not wishing to answer for Bruce (who is completely capable of doing that
himself), but I think he may have meant that "Morag" is such an uncommon
name in the U.S. that it doesn't immediately register to the average
American that it is feminine, not that there actually are guys named Morag
in this country (cf. guys named Sue).

And it wouldn't surprise me if there were. Over the years I've gotten used
to guys named Evelyn, Hilary, Marion and Dana. And I've heard of women
named Dana and Charlie. But (to bring this back more or less to topic) I
never met a guy named Mairi.

Miked

+ + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + +
+ Mike and Norma Briggs +
+ 1519 Storytown Road +
+ Oregon WI 53711-1925 USA +
+ +1 608 835 0914 (voice) +1 608 835 0924 (fax) +
+ + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + +

----- Original Message ----
From: Iain Boyd <iain_boyd_scd@yahoo.co.nz>
To: SCD news and discussion <strathspey@strathspey.org>
Sent: Tuesday, April 29, 2008 4:51:04 PM
Subject: Re: Breakish Postie (who she is)

Dear Bruce,

Where in the US is Morag a non-feminine name?

Regards,

Iain Boyd
(from way down south where Morag has always been a feminine name)

Bruce Herbold <bherbold@gmail.com> wrote:
Even with the original directions, with the cute cartoon, those of us
less familiar with the Scottish Gazeteer can misinterpret a word as
tantalizingly misunderstandable as 'Breakish.' And I think for many
of us across the pond, we have to stop and remember that Morag is a
feminine name -- all of which was doubtless obvious to the Skye dance
community, but requires a little handholding for us slower types.
Thanks again Anselm, I've now done my Google homework and look forward
some day to visiting the beautiful Breakish.

Bruce

On Tue, Apr 29, 2008 at 7:31 AM, Alasdair Graham
wrote:
> The original Book, sold by Isle of Skye Branch ( see
> http://www.skyerscds.org.uk/), contains the following comment on this
> dance.
>
> "Devised by Trevor Rayner, Isle of Skye Branch.
> Dance and Music commissioned by Isle of Skye Branch in recognition of
> Morag
> Gunnarsson's (The Breakish Postie) many years of teaching for the Branch.
> A
> BIG THANK YOU."
>
> This is one of the benefits gained by purchasing (or downloading) the
> original dance instructions!!
>
> Alasdair Graham
> Dumbarton, Scotland
>
> Looking for a dance?
> Call up http://www.dancediary.info to see if something suits.
> Ceilidh Dance Pages
> Country Dance Page & Newsletter.
>
>
>
> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Anselm Lingnau"
>
>
> Bruce Herbold wrote:
>
>
> > Well I taught this up and coming young dance tonight and it was a
> > substantial hit amongst the dancers. However, they were frustrated by
> > my lack of knowledge about what might make a Postie 'Breakish.' Any
> > wiser heads out there?
> >
>
> Breakish is a village on the Isle of Skye.
>
> (It turns out that if the name of a dance sounds odd, it usually refers to
> a
> place or a beverage. Think »Bedrule« or »Drambuie«.)
>
> Anselm
>
>
>

Send instant messages to your online friends http://au.messenger.yahoo.com

Breakish Postie

Message 52262 · Chris & Linda Gaul · 29 Apr 2008 16:29:09 · Top

Greetings!

The Breakish Postie is in Vol 2 of the Skye Collection of Scottish Country
Dances published by the Isle of Skye Branch in 2001.

The dance was devised by Trevor Raynor and commissioned by the Branch in
recognition of Morag Gunnarsson's many years of teaching for the Branch.
Morag was the postie (mailman!) in Breakish.

Hope that helps.

Linda Gaul
Pitlochry
Scotland

> -----Original Message-----
> From: strathspey-bounces-the.gauls=btinternet.com@strathspey.org
> [mailto:strathspey-bounces-the.gauls=btinternet.com@strathspey.org] On
> Behalf Of Bruce Herbold
> Sent: 29 April 2008 08:05
> To: SCD news and discussion
> Subject: Breakish Postie
>
> Well I taught this up and coming young dance tonight and it was a
> substantial hit amongst the dancers. However, they were frustrated by
> my lack of knowledge about what might make a Postie 'Breakish.' Any
> wiser heads out there? (I am hoping for something more definitive
> than my earlier questions about Letting teh Hackles Rise, but thanks
> for the many and diversee thoughts on that theme)
>
> Bruce Herbold
> San Francisco

Breakish Postie

Message 52273 · Fiona Grant · 29 Apr 2008 21:03:56 · Top

Hi Bruce, hi Martin, hi Anselm,
The Breakish Postie is Morag Gunnarson, who drives around Skye in her little
red Post Office van delivering the post. She lives in and is based at
Breakish.
Breakish = http://www.breakish.com/page2.html
Postie = person who delivers post/mail.
Morag is married to Magnus who took the photos on the website.
See also http://www.isleofskye.net/strath/

Fiona
Bristol
UK

Previous thread: Linnea's Strathspey--recommmended music
Next thread: changing dance traditions (wasRe: Circles in palindromes (was RE: Ian Powrie's Farewell))
A Django site.