strathspey Archive: let the hackles rise

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let the hackles rise

Message 52221 · Bruce Herbold · 25 Apr 2008 23:58:18 · Top

okay, Google has failed me for the second time. All but one result
for this dance name are references to the dance (the one non-dance guy
was making a provocative comment about evolution.)

This sounds like a clan motto or suchlike. Anybody actually know what
Mr Drewry had in mind?

thanks

Bruce Herbold
San Francisco

let the hackles rise

Message 52223 · Peter Price · 26 Apr 2008 01:01:53 · Top

Bruce,

It is in The Canadian Book and may take it's name from the tune which is by
Andrew Rankine. No story or anecdote.

Peter

On Fri, Apr 25, 2008 at 5:58 PM, Bruce Herbold <bherbold@gmail.com> wrote:

> okay, Google has failed me for the second time. All but one result
> for this dance name are references to the dance (the one non-dance guy
> was making a provocative comment about evolution.)
>
> This sounds like a clan motto or suchlike. Anybody actually know what
> Mr Drewry had in mind?
>
> thanks
>
> Bruce Herbold
> San Francisco
>

let the hackles rise

Message 52224 · Bruce Herbold · 26 Apr 2008 01:27:49 · Top

Yeah, I know that but if it is named for the tune, it just delays the
question of why the tune is called that. I can say that all of the
musicians who have played it in my two classes consider it a vile tune
-- "Hmmph! 4 notes and 2 chords" was one reaction.

But the dance is great -- espeically following on from the list's
discussion of MacLeod's Fancy with the same reels of four twisted at
the end. Cool stuff!

Bruce Herbold
San Francisco

On 4/25/08, Peter Price <peter.price1672@gmail.com> wrote:
> Bruce,
>
> It is in The Canadian Book and may take it's name from the tune which is by
> Andrew Rankine. No story or anecdote.
>
> Peter
>
> On Fri, Apr 25, 2008 at 5:58 PM, Bruce Herbold <bherbold@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > okay, Google has failed me for the second time. All but one result
> > for this dance name are references to the dance (the one non-dance guy
> > was making a provocative comment about evolution.)
> >
> > This sounds like a clan motto or suchlike. Anybody actually know what
> > Mr Drewry had in mind?
> >
> > thanks
> >
> > Bruce Herbold
> > San Francisco
> >
>

let the hackles rise

Message 52227 · Eric Clyde · 26 Apr 2008 03:28:08 · Top

If you do a Google search on Hackle, you will find a good description in
Wikipedia.
The url is http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hackle

Eric Clyde
Ottawa

Bruce Herbold wrote:
> okay, Google has failed me for the second time. All but one result
> for this dance name are references to the dance (the one non-dance guy
> was making a provocative comment about evolution.)
>
> This sounds like a clan motto or suchlike. Anybody actually know what
> Mr Drewry had in mind?
>
> thanks
>
> Bruce Herbold
> San Francisco
>
>

let the hackles rise

Message 52228 · Mike Briggs · 26 Apr 2008 04:19:48 · Top

Well, yes . . . nice Wikipedia article on 'hackles.' But whence the
phrase 'Let the hackles rise?'

Mike

--
BRIGGS LAW OFFICE
Michael and Norma Briggs
1519 Storytown Road
Oregon WI 53575-2521 USA
+1 608 835 0914
www.briggslawoffice.com

let the hackles rise

Message 52231 · Andrew Smith · 26 Apr 2008 08:26:40 · Top

I cannot find the phrase, but am sure that I have heard it in conjunction
with one of the Scots regiments being encouraged to get up from cover and to
charge the enemy under fire, but the when and where eludes me.
[It can also be used in the context of getting angry, "His hackles rose"and
a hackle is a fishing fly, to which the fish might rise.]
Andrew Smith,
Bristol, UK.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Norma and Mike Briggs" <briggslaw@yahoo.com>
To: "SCD news and discussion" <strathspey@strathspey.org>
Sent: Saturday, April 26, 2008 3:19 AM
Subject: Re: let the hackles rise

> Well, yes . . . nice Wikipedia article on 'hackles.' But whence the
> phrase 'Let the hackles rise?'
>
> Mike
>
> --
> BRIGGS LAW OFFICE
> Michael and Norma Briggs
> 1519 Storytown Road
> Oregon WI 53575-2521 USA
> +1 608 835 0914
> www.briggslawoffice.com
>
>
>
>
>
>

let the hackles rise

Message 52234 · Angus Henry · 26 Apr 2008 10:25:36 · Top

You're probably right, Andrew; a hackle is a cockerel's neck feather
and was incorporated into Scottish regimental hat badges, eventually
becoming "the red hackle" etc for the large coloured 'streak' up the
bonnet and used in reference to the regiment. 'Let the hackles
rise' sounds to me like a poetic form of "charge", or at least an
earlier stirring of a clan to warfare.

Angus

On 26-04-2008, at 15:56, Andrew Smith wrote:

> I cannot find the phrase, but am sure that I have heard it in
> conjunction with one of the Scots regiments being encouraged to get
> up from cover and to charge the enemy under fire, but the when and
> where eludes me.
> [It can also be used in the context of getting angry, "His hackles
> rose"and a hackle is a fishing fly, to which the fish might rise.]
> Andrew Smith,
> Bristol, UK.
> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Norma and Mike Briggs"
> <briggslaw@yahoo.com>
> To: "SCD news and discussion" <strathspey@strathspey.org>
> Sent: Saturday, April 26, 2008 3:19 AM
> Subject: Re: let the hackles rise
>
>
>> Well, yes . . . nice Wikipedia article on 'hackles.' But whence
>> the phrase 'Let the hackles rise?'
>>
>> Mike
>>
>> --
>> BRIGGS LAW OFFICE
>> Michael and Norma Briggs
>> 1519 Storytown Road
>> Oregon WI 53575-2521 USA
>> +1 608 835 0914
>> www.briggslawoffice.com
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>

Angus & Puka Henry
DARWIN, AUSTRALIA
Website: <http://www.users.on.net/~anguka/>

let the hackles rise

Message 52232 · Andrew Smith · 26 Apr 2008 08:48:46 · Top

PS.
As I understand John Drewry comes from Aberdeen, it may refer to the Gordon
Highlanders, whose regimental museum is there. Alternatively, my money
would be on the Black Watch, who still wear a distinctive red hackle, and
are the only British regiment so to do, I understand.
Andrew Smith,
Bristol, UK.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Norma and Mike Briggs" <briggslaw@yahoo.com>
To: "SCD news and discussion" <strathspey@strathspey.org>
Sent: Saturday, April 26, 2008 3:19 AM
Subject: Re: let the hackles rise

> Well, yes . . . nice Wikipedia article on 'hackles.' But whence the
> phrase 'Let the hackles rise?'
>
> Mike
>
> --
> BRIGGS LAW OFFICE
> Michael and Norma Briggs
> 1519 Storytown Road
> Oregon WI 53575-2521 USA
> +1 608 835 0914
> www.briggslawoffice.com
>
>
>
>
>
>

let the hackles rise

Message 52233 · Jim Healy · 26 Apr 2008 09:16:46 · Top

Greetings!

Andrew Smith suggests:
> my money would be on the Black Watch, who still wear a distinctive red hackle, and > are the only British regiment so to do, I understand.

Regrettably, no longer true as the Black Watch is not a regiment anymore but merely one battalion of the mongrel Royal Regiment of Scotland. All of the battalions of the regiment wear hackles - the following from Wikipedia:

[quote] Also in No. 1 and No. 2 pattern ceremonial dress, all battalions wear a black and white cockfeather hackle attached to a Glengarry , in a tradition taken from the Royal Scots and King's Own Scottish Borderers (although described as Lowland this pattern was in fact common to the Seaforth Highlanders and Gordon Highlanders as well as three Lowland regiments). While in combat dress, each battalion wears its own unique coloured hackle on the Tam o’Shanter

1st Battalion - Black (The Royal Scots Borderers)
2nd Battalion - White (The Royal Highland Fusiliers)
3rd Battalion - Red (The Black Watch)
4th Battalion - Blue (The Highlanders)
5th Battalion - Green (The Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders)
6th Battalion - White/Black (52nd Lowland Territorials)
7th Battalion - Red/Blue/Green (51st Highland Territorials)
[unquote]

As regards a military context for the phrase, I can add nothing concrete

Jim Healy
Perth, Scotland
_________________________________________________________________
Be a superhero and win! Play the Iron Man Mashup Game
http://www.ironmanmashup.co.uk

let the hackles rise

Message 52235 · Andrew C Aitchison · 26 Apr 2008 12:54:05 · Top

On Fri, 25 Apr 2008, Norma and Mike Briggs wrote:

> Well, yes . . . nice Wikipedia article on 'hackles.' But whence the phrase
> 'Let the hackles rise?'

I think that the hackles of a cock bird go up when he is roused to
defend is territory or harem.

Whether this is true for many birds or most especially for one or more of
the game birds (I'm thinking black cock/black grouse and cappercaillie)
I am not sure.

let the hackles rise

Message 52239 · ron.mackey · 27 Apr 2008 01:07:55 · Top

>
> I think that the hackles of a cock bird go up when he is roused to defend
> is territory or harem.
>

While all this seems likely I have it in my head that it is a coded call
to arms. I also have a gut feeling that somewhere there is a reference in
song. Need someone with the depth of musical kowlege of John Drewry to
answer that one properly.
Or can anyone contact John Mitchell who is another with an amazing
ability to recall facts.
Ron

let the hackles rise

Message 52240 · alan mair · 27 Apr 2008 20:59:38 · Top

Red Hackle was at one time a very popular blend of whisky. The owner,
Charles Hepburn, was also very involved in piping in Glasgow and sponsored
(?) a pipe band by the same name which was apparently very successful. That
may well provide the link between the regimental cap badge and the tune.

As for the expression "let the hackles rise", while it might have a
historical connection with the regiment, I think it was used as an
advertising slogan and, consequently, a call to raise glasses rather than to
arms.

Alan
Cupar
Fife

----- Original Message -----
From: "Ron Mackey" <ron.mackey@talktalk.net>
To: "SCD news and discussion" <strathspey@strathspey.org>
Sent: Sunday, April 27, 2008 12:07 AM
Subject: Re: let the hackles rise

>
>>
>> I think that the hackles of a cock bird go up when he is roused to defend
>> is territory or harem.
>>
>
> While all this seems likely I have it in my head that it is a coded
> call to arms. I also have a gut feeling that somewhere there is a
> reference in song. Need someone with the depth of musical kowlege of
> John Drewry to answer that one properly.
> Or can anyone contact John Mitchell who is another with an amazing
> ability to recall facts.
> Ron
>
>
>

let the hackles rise

Message 52249 · marlene davidson · 29 Apr 2008 02:20:43 · Top

In the dim dim light of my memory, I seem to associate this with one of the
Scottish Regiments!
Perhaps it is on their hat badge or somesuch. Maybe someone would like to
chase this further?

Mary [Brisbane Oz]

let the hackles rise

Message 52251 · Norman Dahl · 29 Apr 2008 04:14:25 · Top

I have always understood that "hackles rising" was a phrase
indicating rising anger or irritation, and that "hackles" referred to
the erectile hair on the neck of a dog rather than the neck feathers
of a bird. This is confirmed by sources such as the Cambridge
Dictionary Online <http://dictionary.cambridge.org/define.asp?
dict=CALD&key=35164>, which gives the example "The prime minister's
speech has raised hackles among the opposition."

However, the way the term is used in this dance title (=let= the
hackles rise) suggests to me that the deviser had something else in
mind; maybe the idea was of an artificial fishing fly trimmed with a
hackle rising up to the surface of the loch - if that is what flies
do; I thought they more often sank.

-norman-

---
Norman Dahl
Brisbane, Australia

It is never too late to be what you might have been.
-- George Eliot
---

On 29/04/2008, at 10:20 AM, marlene davidson wrote:

> In the dim dim light of my memory, I seem to associate this with
> one of the
> Scottish Regiments!
> Perhaps it is on their hat badge or somesuch. Maybe someone would
> like to
> chase this further?
>
> Mary [Brisbane Oz]
>
>

let the hackles rise

Message 52257 · Pia Walker · 29 Apr 2008 09:36:51 · Top

Most of the regiments have hackles - the most famous is probably the Black
Watch who was awarded their red hackle in 17 hundred something I think for
(they have a website). There are also white, green, red over white (two
tone) - black, white over red etc etc. I suppose it helped on the battle
ground to know that if a head had a hat with a duster, it may be one of your
own.

Pia

-----Original Message-----
From: strathspey-bounces-pia=intamail.com@strathspey.org
[mailto:strathspey-bounces-pia=intamail.com@strathspey.org]On Behalf Of
marlene davidson
Sent: 29 April 2008 01:21
To: SCD news and discussion
Subject: Re: let the hackles rise

In the dim dim light of my memory, I seem to associate this with one of the
Scottish Regiments!
Perhaps it is on their hat badge or somesuch. Maybe someone would like to
chase this further?

Mary [Brisbane Oz]

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