strathspey Archive: Richmond, Virginia dance

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Richmond, Virginia dance

Message 50084 · Stella Fogg · 22 Oct 2007 16:35:45 · Top

The Scottish Country Dancers of Richmond, VA
and
The Richmond Highland Games and Celtic Festival
invite you to a dance
Saturday October 27, 2007
1pm
at the Celtic Culture Stage
on the grounds at Richmond Raceway Complex, Richmond, Virginia

Featuring

David Knight on Fiddle & Pete Campbell on Keyboard

Pot luck dinner following the games, 6pm (directions will be available at the dance)

Programme
Mrs. Stewart's Jig RSCDS Book 35- F. Ligtmans
Currie Mountain New Brunswick Coll - M. Pugh
Miss Gibson's Strathspey RSCDS Leaflet - D. Haynes
Roaring Jelly Glendarroch Sheet - H. Foss
Davy Nick Nack Glasgow Assembly - R. Campbell
Asilomar Romantic San Francisco Vol. 2 - T. Cuthbertson
Lamb Skinnet RSCDS Book 14 - Thompson (18C)
The Montgomeries' Rant RSCDS Book 10 -Castle Menzies (18C)
Culla Bay RSCDS Book 41 -A. Dix
Quarrie's Jig RSCDS Book 36 - K. Smith
Balgeddie Reel Memories of Fife - M. Brandon
Fair Donald RSCDS Book 29 - Unknown
Pelorus Jack RSCDS Book 41- B. Skelton
The Reel of the Royal Scots RSCDS Leaflet - R. Goldring

Richmond, Virginia dance Programme

Message 50085 · hways · 23 Oct 2007 03:09:42 · Top

More (all?) dance programs should be presented as this one is, listing both
the source of the dance and the name of the deviser. Thank You Stella

Harry Ways

----- Original Message -----
From: "Stella Fogg" <stellafogg@comcast.net>
To: "strathspey" <strathspey@strathspey.org>
Sent: Monday, October 22, 2007 10:35 AM
Subject: Richmond, Virginia dance

The Scottish Country Dancers of Richmond, VA
and
The Richmond Highland Games and Celtic Festival
invite you to a dance
Saturday October 27, 2007
1pm
at the Celtic Culture Stage
on the grounds at Richmond Raceway Complex, Richmond,
Virginia

Featuring

David Knight on Fiddle & Pete Campbell on
Keyboard

Pot luck dinner following the games, 6pm (directions will be
available at the dance)

Programme
Mrs. Stewart's Jig RSCDS Book 35- F. Ligtmans
Currie Mountain New Brunswick Coll - M. Pugh
Miss Gibson's Strathspey RSCDS Leaflet - D. Haynes
Roaring Jelly Glendarroch Sheet - H. Foss
Davy Nick Nack Glasgow Assembly - R. Campbell
Asilomar Romantic San Francisco Vol. 2 - T.
Cuthbertson
Lamb Skinnet RSCDS Book 14 - Thompson (18C)
The Montgomeries' Rant RSCDS Book 10 -Castle Menzies (18C)
Culla Bay RSCDS Book 41 -A. Dix
Quarrie's Jig RSCDS Book 36 - K. Smith
Balgeddie Reel Memories of Fife - M. Brandon
Fair Donald RSCDS Book 29 - Unknown
Pelorus Jack RSCDS Book 41- B. Skelton
The Reel of the Royal Scots RSCDS Leaflet - R. Goldring

Richmond, Virginia dance Programme

Message 50086 · Elainerb · 23 Oct 2007 13:54:50 · Top

Actually I like it when a programme is presented.

Name of dance 8x32J 3C source book
Name of next dance 3x32S 3C source book

That way you have ALL the info.

Elaine
Maryland, USA

************************************** See what's new at http://www.aol.com

Richmond, Virginia dance Programme

Message 50087 · Anselm Lingnau · 23 Oct 2007 14:48:40 · Top

Elainerb@aol.com wrote:

> Actually I like it when a programme is presented.
>
> Name of dance 8x32J 3C source book
> Name of next dance 3x32S 3C source book
>
> That way you have ALL the info.

If you register as a my.strathspey user, then this is exactly what you get if
you use the »dance selection« feature in the DanceData web frontend and then
select »Export« from the »Manage« screen. Here's a specimen output from that
function:

1. The Laird of Milton's Daughter J32 3C/4 RSCDS XXII 10
2. The Compliment S32 2C/4 Goldring: Goldring 12more
3. Duke of Perth R32 3C/4 RSCDS I 8
4. The Flying Spur J32 3C/4 Drewry: Canadian
5. The Gentleman S32 3C/4 RSCDS XXXV 5
6. J.B. Milne R32 3C/4 Foss: Angus Fitchet

It'll also let you have HTML complete with links into DanceData for all the
dances, authors, and books, so you can put the list up on your own web page.
This way, figuring out the authors and sources is pretty much a non-brainer.

Help stamp out non-source programs!

Anselm
--
Anselm Lingnau, Frankfurt, Germany ..................... anselm@strathspey.org
There is no nonsense so errant that it cannot be made the creed of the vast
majority by adequate governmental action. -- Bertrand Russell

Dance program formats

Message 50088 · Etienne Ozorak · 23 Oct 2007 15:07:19 · Top

I second Elaine's format for one important point. Sometimes groups opt to
do a dance 6x rather than 8x through. It's extremely helpful for musicians
to have the number of repetitions actually listed on the program.

Etienne Ozorak
Meadville, PA USA

----- Original Message -----
From: "Anselm Lingnau" <anselm@strathspey.org>
To: "SCD news and discussion" <strathspey@strathspey.org>
Sent: Tuesday, October 23, 2007 8:48 AM
Subject: Re: Richmond, Virginia dance Programme

> Elainerb@aol.com wrote:
>
>> Actually I like it when a programme is presented.
>>
>> Name of dance 8x32J 3C source book
>> Name of next dance 3x32S 3C source book
>>
>> That way you have ALL the info.
>
> If you register as a my.strathspey user, then this is exactly what you get
> if
> you use the »dance selection« feature in the DanceData web frontend and
> then
> select »Export« from the »Manage« screen. Here's a specimen output from
> that
> function:
>
> 1. The Laird of Milton's Daughter J32 3C/4 RSCDS XXII 10
> 2. The Compliment S32 2C/4 Goldring: Goldring
> 12more
> 3. Duke of Perth R32 3C/4 RSCDS I 8
> 4. The Flying Spur J32 3C/4 Drewry: Canadian
> 5. The Gentleman S32 3C/4 RSCDS XXXV 5
> 6. J.B. Milne R32 3C/4 Foss: Angus Fitchet
>
> It'll also let you have HTML complete with links into DanceData for all
> the
> dances, authors, and books, so you can put the list up on your own web
> page.
> This way, figuring out the authors and sources is pretty much a
> non-brainer.
>
> Help stamp out non-source programs!
>
> Anselm
> --
> Anselm Lingnau, Frankfurt, Germany .....................
> anselm@strathspey.org
> There is no nonsense so errant that it cannot be made the creed of the
> vast
> majority by adequate governmental action. -- Bertrand
> Russell
>

Program format

Message 50089 · Loretta Holz · 23 Oct 2007 15:46:06 · Top

Anselm gave examples of dance program format generated by his website--
1. The Laird of Milton's Daughter J32 3C/4 RSCDS XXII 10
2. The Compliment S32 2C/4 Goldring: Goldring
12more
3. Duke of Perth R32 3C/4 RSCDS I 8
4. The Flying Spur J32 3C/4 Drewry: Canadian
5. The Gentleman S32 3C/4 RSCDS XXXV 5
6. J.B. Milne R32 3C/4 Foss: Angus Fitchet

This is a wonderful service you are providing to those who make up the
dance booklet, Anselm. Thanks for all the work you do for the rest of
us.

My question is this --
when the dance is in an RSCDS publication the devisor is not named (for
example, RSCDS XXXV 5). If it is not in an RSCDS book the devisor is
named along with the publication (for example, Drewry: Canadian). Just
wondering why the devisor does not get personal credit once the dance is
in an RSCDS publication.
Loretta
Loretta Holz, Warren, NJ USA

Program format

Message 50095 · Brian Charlton · 24 Oct 2007 00:04:19 · Top

G'Day,

My guess as to the reason for this is that the original data used to compile
DanceData did not include it. To add this information would be quite a large
task (more than 500 dances). If anyone would like to undertake it, then I
suggest they get in touch with Alan Paterson about how he would like to
receive it and he will, I am sure, be happy to add it to the database.

Brian Charlton,
Sydney, Australia

On 23/10/2007, Loretta Holz <loretta@varisys.com> wrote:
>
> Anselm gave examples of dance program format generated by his website--
> 1. The Laird of Milton's Daughter J32 3C/4 RSCDS XXII 10
> 2. The Compliment S32 2C/4 Goldring: Goldring
> 12more
> 3. Duke of Perth R32 3C/4 RSCDS I 8
> 4. The Flying Spur J32 3C/4 Drewry: Canadian
> 5. The Gentleman S32 3C/4 RSCDS XXXV 5
> 6. J.B. Milne R32 3C/4 Foss: Angus Fitchet
>
> This is a wonderful service you are providing to those who make up the
> dance booklet, Anselm. Thanks for all the work you do for the rest of
> us.
>
> My question is this --
> when the dance is in an RSCDS publication the devisor is not named (for
> example, RSCDS XXXV 5). If it is not in an RSCDS book the devisor is
> named along with the publication (for example, Drewry: Canadian). Just
> wondering why the devisor does not get personal credit once the dance is
> in an RSCDS publication.
> Loretta
> Loretta Holz, Warren, NJ USA
>

Program format

Message 50098 · Anselm Lingnau · 24 Oct 2007 08:49:34 · Top

Brian Charlton wrote:

> My guess as to the reason for this is that the original data used to
> compile DanceData did not include it.

I suppose this is really my fault rather than Alan's -- I think the data is
essentially there, it's just that I've been following the example of the
Pilling book by not mentioning the author's name with RSCDS dances. (Which is
silly really, as a big part of the justification for this service is that
Pilling does NOT give ANY source for all the dances in the book that are not
by either RSCDS, Drewry, Cosh or Foss.) Also, many of the RSCDS dances are
nominally from old dance books and/or the living tradition with no deviser
known.

I'll look into changing this but as I'm in the process of moving house (a
terrible experience; don't do it) I don't have a time frame yet.

Anselm
--
Anselm Lingnau, Frankfurt, Germany ..................... anselm@strathspey.org
The First Rule of Program Optimization: Don't do it.
The Second Rule of Program Optimization (for experts only!): Don't do it yet.
-- Michael Jackson

Program format

Message 50099 · Brian Charlton · 24 Oct 2007 09:12:21 · Top

Hello,

I did check on DanceData before sending my earlier email, but the source was
given as {unknown) for dances in the society books. It therefore needs a
fair amount of time to go through all the books and gather the relevant
information for input to the relevant field of the database,

Brian Charlton,
Sydney, Australia

On 24/10/2007, Anselm Lingnau <anselm@strathspey.org> wrote:
>
> Brian Charlton wrote:
>
> > My guess as to the reason for this is that the original data used to
> > compile DanceData did not include it.
>
> I suppose this is really my fault rather than Alan's -- I think the data
> is
> essentially there, it's just that I've been following the example of the
> Pilling book by not mentioning the author's name with RSCDS dances. (Which
> is
> silly really, as a big part of the justification for this service is that
> Pilling does NOT give ANY source for all the dances in the book that are
> not
> by either RSCDS, Drewry, Cosh or Foss.) Also, many of the RSCDS dances are
> nominally from old dance books and/or the living tradition with no deviser
> known.
>
> I'll look into changing this but as I'm in the process of moving house (a
> terrible experience; don't do it) I don't have a time frame yet.
>
> Anselm
> --
> Anselm Lingnau, Frankfurt, Germany .....................
> anselm@strathspey.org
> The First Rule of Program Optimization: Don't do it.
> The Second Rule of Program Optimization (for experts only!): Don't do it
> yet.
> -- Michael
> Jackson
>

Program format

Message 50124 · Alan Paterson · 25 Oct 2007 07:36:46 · Top

On 24/10/2007 09:12, Brian Charlton wrote:
> Hello,
>
> I did check on DanceData before sending my earlier email, but the source was
> given as {unknown) for dances in the society books. It therefore needs a
> fair amount of time to go through all the books and gather the relevant
> information for input to the relevant field of the database,
>
> Brian Charlton,
> Sydney, Australia

Brian.

My data on the RSCDS dances has, in all cases, been (at least partially)
verified from an RSCDS document. If the deviser is not given in the book, then
Dancedata has it as "Unknown".

Alan

Program format

Message 50160 · ron.mackey · 25 Nov 2007 22:56:13 · Top

> My data on the RSCDS dances has, in all cases, been (at least partially)
> verified from an RSCDS document. If the deviser is not given in the book,
> then Dancedata has it as "Unknown".
>
>
> Alan
>

Hi, Alan
Any easy way of labelling any without an author as 'anon'?
That would put a bit of an extra burden on your checkers but only for the
once.

Regards

Ron

Ron Mackey
Mottingham

London, Croydon & International Branches

Program format

Message 50225 · Alan Paterson · 29 Oct 2007 13:27:01 · Top

On 25/11/2007 22:56, Ron Mackey wrote:
>> My data on the RSCDS dances has, in all cases, been (at least
>> partially) verified from an RSCDS document. If the deviser is not
>> given in the book, then Dancedata has it as "Unknown".
>>
>>
>> Alan
>>
>
> Hi, Alan
> Any easy way of labelling any without an author as 'anon'?
> That would put a bit of an extra burden on your checkers but only for
> the once.
>
> Regards
>
> Ron

Hi Ron.

Do you mean having two "devisers" - Anon (lost in the mists of time) and
"Unknown" - just not yet determined? If so - is it really worth it? I.e. is
there any benefit from this distinction?

Alan

Morris/morris dance?

Message 50317 · Tappan · 1 Nov 2007 02:41:47 · Top

Dear Dancers,
I know this isn't exactly your area of expertise, but would you know
if one should capitalize Morris in "Morris Dance" or should one write
"morris dance" all lower case instead? Context is this..."[tune
title] is also the name of a tune for a Welsh morris dance." I
wondered if morris is a proper noun, being a specific dance, or if
it's more generic. And - the Welsh *do* have M/morris D/dancing,
don't they?

Thanks in advance,
Jan Tappan, finally de-lurking!

Morris/morris dance?

Message 50318 · Patricia Ruggiero · 1 Nov 2007 03:36:48 · Top

Jan Tappan wrote:

>if one should capitalize Morris in "Morris Dance" or should one write
"morris dance"

Anthony G. (Tony) Barrand, author of "Six Fools and a Dancer," capitalizes
the word "Morris" but not the word "dance" throughout this text.

Tony, an Englishman now living in Vermont, is Associate Professor of
Anthropology at Boston Univ. He has been documenting Morris and longsword
for close to 30 years, in books, articles, and videos.

Pat
Charlottesville, Virginia
USA

Morris/morris dance?

Message 50320 · GOSS9@telefonica.net · 1 Nov 2007 10:53:11 · Top

Hi Jan, it has been a while.

The weather her is really bad on Mallorca, got a bit of snow
yesterday, so I am staying inside and your post caught my interest, so
I did a little research.

I realized that we are a specialized bunch and not a part of the
general population, so I went in two directions. The Grove musical
dictionary, Cecil Sharp, and the EFDSS publications all use upper case.

The OED, Encyclopaedia Britannica, and some othere refrence sources,
including some general ones on dance use lower case.

While we are sort of back where you started, I have reached some
conclusions based on a pattern I have found from the linguistic side.
If the modifier is based on a proper noun in English, it is usually in
upper case, especially if the proper noun is related to a particular
part of the world using its English term such as "German", Polish,
Scottish, etc. On the other hand, when the word is either obscure, or
that form used in anothr language, as in allemande, pol[s]ka/polonaise,
schottische/esossais, it is not.

Since all the sources I found that give a derevation for "morris" as
"Moorish" then the latter is in upper case, while the former is not
(supported by the OED and Britannica). So, following these sources,
unless we use upper case for: allemande, polka, strathspey*, we should
not for "morris" unless it is part of the title of a specific dance.
-----
*Checked, OED, Britannica, EFDSS, Grove, and Miss M (original WYJTD),
do not put Strathspey in upper case, but the SOBHD does. On the other
hand, the SOBHD does not refer to strathspey setting steps, calling
them "fling" steps, so all their references are to a particular dance.

My conclusion, no for the generic, as in your "Welsh morris dance",
no.

As an aside, the English point of view, even in foreign language
sources is interesting. While all list this as a European phenomena,
the model seems to be English. The Italian "morisco" having common
origins has evolved beyond its ritual context. Here on Mallorca, the
tradition is very alive, as it also is in the Basque country, but not
in the Celtic areas. Because the dancers run around a lot, the local
word is "cosaires" (In historic times piracy was an important part of
the Mallorquín economy, so the word applies to these guys who also did
a lot of hit and run). While several teams (called "colles" [groups),
or "penyes" [circles groups clubs], derived from the word for "pine
cone" - image - compare the view of a pine cone from above with that of
a rugby scrum, or American football huddle.

The most ancient, and viable team here is in the next village,
Algaida. They are so proud of it that its roundabout features the
statue of a "cossair" in the center, complete with bells, similar
costume, ribbons, and handkerchief. The singular handkershief is
because in the right hand he holds a boquet of basil (good for driving
off mosquitos and dimonis). While the majority of teams here, follow
the pattern of male bonding and drinking society, who actually practice
and perform sometimes. The team in Algaida is more liberated in that
the woman is a woman, though all the dancers are male. To create a
balance, there are several women who take turns in this role, and their
are women in the band (pipes [xeremia] and pipe and tabor [flabiol i
tambor]. In the all male groups where the woman is a man in drag, he is
usually bearded even though the beard might not be home grown. In
Palma, the morris team is all male, including the woman, but all the
hoby horse teams (cavellets) have a real female as leader. Some of the
local saints get a bit confused in that on midsummer night´s eve (Nit
de Sant Joan), they mix evangelist with paptist, so the Baptist (male
dancer) sdances with the lamb of the Apocolips in his arms (in the UK,
they would call the RSPCA), but the morris team, the only traditional
team I have seen, is female and represent eagles (back to Revelations),
replacing the horse with the bird, looking more like a peacock. There
is an historic heraldic element here also as the coat of arms is an
eagle, allusion to Rome, and has eagles supporters.

In the extended English Morris traditions, e.g. coconut dancers, we
also have "moretons" (Moors), "indios", and some others who wear big
heads. While many of these have the stick clashing tradition, two from
our county town, Manacor have versions I have not seen in the UK. The
cossairs here have a stick in the right hand, and a targe in the left
for some of their dances, which involve clashing these objects in
various ways. The other "moretons" dressed as "moors" have wooden
blocks strapped onto their hands, shoulders, belt, and kneecaps. During
a part of the choreography, I will call setting or shuffling, the
effect of the hand held clacking the shoulders, belt and knees, sounds
like hardshoe step dancing.

Except for the final dance of the sequence when the dimoni is actually
killed by the virgin, he has little to do with the set. His costume
looks like the "green man" though his mask (often a reproduction to one
hundreds of years old kept in the city hall), suggests that of the wild
man on English coats of arms, except he has real goat horns. Beneath
his tail is a goat´s bell, and he carries a club or hay fork. In the
early part of the ritual, his function is to precede the dancers to the
boundary crosses, clearing the roads, and creating a large enough area
for the dancers, driving the people back with his club. The kid thing
is to sneak up behind him and ring his bell, causing him to turn around
and chase the kids - this can be tricky trying to draw the line between
being fearsome and dangerous, and being a character of fun and
ridicule.

If ever in Mallorca, I recommend lunch at "Cal Dimoni" (house of the
demon), in Algaida, which has about 100 demon masques on one wall, some
original, some reproduction - good traditional food also.

Program format

Message 50114 · Robert Lambie · 24 Oct 2007 23:40:08 · Top

The RSCDS references to old manuscripts or publications have to be taken as
meaning "loosely based on", unfortuately, and often are rather wild flights
of fancy. Most other organisations in the world of country dancing seem to
be printing the original beside their interpretations these days, which is
rather more honest. I wonder when the RSCDS will get its act together?

>From: Anselm Lingnau <anselm@strathspey.org>
>Reply-To: SCD news and discussion <strathspey@strathspey.org>
>To: SCD news and discussion <strathspey@strathspey.org>
>Subject: Re: Program format
>Date: Wed, 24 Oct 2007 08:49:34 +0200
>
>Brian Charlton wrote:
>
> > My guess as to the reason for this is that the original data used to
> > compile DanceData did not include it.
>
>I suppose this is really my fault rather than Alan's -- I think the data is
>essentially there, it's just that I've been following the example of the
>Pilling book by not mentioning the author's name with RSCDS dances. (Which
>is
>silly really, as a big part of the justification for this service is that
>Pilling does NOT give ANY source for all the dances in the book that are
>not
>by either RSCDS, Drewry, Cosh or Foss.) Also, many of the RSCDS dances are
>nominally from old dance books and/or the living tradition with no deviser
>known.
>
>I'll look into changing this but as I'm in the process of moving house (a
>terrible experience; don't do it) I don't have a time frame yet.
>
>Anselm
>--
>Anselm Lingnau, Frankfurt, Germany .....................
>anselm@strathspey.org
>The First Rule of Program Optimization: Don't do it.
>The Second Rule of Program Optimization (for experts only!): Don't do it
>yet.
> -- Michael
>Jackson

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Richmond, Virginia dance Programme

Message 50094 · e.ferguson · 23 Oct 2007 23:37:37 · Top

I feel strongly that when naming or describing a dance, it is disrespectful
to omit the name of the artist/deviser. In other fields of art (e.g.
music, sculpture, painting, literature, film) such disrespect is very rare.

I agree with Harry Ways that Stella's Virginia dance Programme is excellent
in listing both the source publication and the deviser.

I hope that Anselm will add the devisers' names to the dances with RSCDS
book as source; is there any reason to treat these differently?

Happy dancing,

Eric

On 23 Oct 2007 at 14:48, Anselm Lingnau wrote:

> <......> If you register as a my.strathspey user, then this is exactly
> what you get if you use the »dance selection« feature in the DanceData web
> frontend and then select »Export« from the »Manage« screen. Here's a
> specimen output from that function:

> 1. The Laird of Milton's Daughter J32 3C/4 RSCDS XXII 10
> 2. The Compliment S32 2C/4 Goldring: Goldring 12more
> 3. Duke of Perth R32 3C/4 RSCDS I 8
> 4. The Flying Spur J32 3C/4 Drewry: Canadian
> 5. The Gentleman S32 3C/4 RSCDS XXXV 5
> 6. J.B. Milne R32 3C/4 Foss: Angus Fitchet

> <.....>

--
Eric T. Ferguson,
van Reenenweg 3,
3702 SB ZEIST Netherlands
tel: 030-2673638
e-mail: e.ferguson@antenna.nl

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