strathspey Archive: "The Piper and the Penguin"

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"The Piper and the Penguin"

Message 48007 · Colleen Putt · 30 Jan 2007 14:00:03 · Top

We've been doing this in my class over the last couple of weeks, and
the dancers really like it. I got the instructions from dance cribs
and the ever-useful Pilling. I know it's a Goldring dance, but the
dancers and I are intrigued by the title. Can anyone enlighten me
about the inspiration?
Cheers,
Colleen Putt
Bedford, Nova Scotia

"The Piper and the Penguin"

Message 48008 · Sophie Rickebusch · 30 Jan 2007 14:36:43 · Top

If you enter "piper" and "penguin" in Google pictures, you will find the photo
which inspired the title of the dance. It is also reproduced in the "Scotia
suite" book from which the dance is taken (for more details about the book and
how it came about, see http://www.rscds.org/shop/scotiast.htm ).

I've taught it to dancers in Switzerland and in France and they enjoyed it too.

Sophie

Selon cputt@staff.ednet.ns.ca:

> We've been doing this in my class over the last couple of weeks, and
> the dancers really like it. I got the instructions from dance cribs
> and the ever-useful Pilling. I know it's a Goldring dance, but the
> dancers and I are intrigued by the title. Can anyone enlighten me
> about the inspiration?

--
Sophie Rickebusch
FR - St Martin d'Heres

"The Piper and the Penguin"

Message 48011 · Anselm Lingnau · 30 Jan 2007 14:48:20 · Top

Sophie Rickebusch schrieb:

> If you enter "piper" and "penguin" in Google pictures, you will find the
> photo which inspired the title of the dance.

There are various piper-and-penguin pictures there but the one closest to the
one in the book is the one on »rangerband.org«.

Looking at these pictures it occurred to me that the one in the Scotia Suite
book has apparently been mirrored (publishers will do this if they think it
looks better). Pipers normally wedge the bag under their left arm and play
the chanter with the left hand above the right, so unless Kerr was a very
unusual piper Google has it right.

Anselm
--
Anselm Lingnau, Frankfurt, Germany ..................... anselm@strathspey.org
To know is nothing at all; to imagine is everything. -- Anatole France

"The Piper and the Penguin"

Message 48013 · Sophie Rickebusch · 30 Jan 2007 16:29:56 · Top

Selon Anselm Lingnau <anselm@strathspey.org>:

> Looking at these pictures it occurred to me that the one in the Scotia Suite
> book has apparently been mirrored (publishers will do this if they think it
> looks better).

Or possibly someone at some point in the last 100 or so years accidentally
turned the negative the wrong way round or made a paper to paper copy (which
would revert the picture unless you did it in two steps) - it was easily done
before digitalisation came into reproduction photography!

> Pipers normally wedge the bag under their left arm and play
> the chanter with the left hand above the right, so unless Kerr was a very
> unusual piper Google has it right.

Interesting - do all pipers play the same way, even left-handed ones?

Sophie
--
Sophie Rickebusch
FR - St Martin d'Heres

"The Piper and the Penguin"

Message 48014 · Colleen Putt · 30 Jan 2007 16:22:05 · Top

Thanks to all who replied.
Cheers,
Colleen

"The Piper and the Penguin"

Message 48066 · John Cahill · 3 Feb 2007 03:03:21 · Top

At 07:29 AM 1/30/2007, Sophie wrote:

> > Pipers normally wedge the bag under their left arm and play
> > the chanter with the left hand above the right, so unless Kerr was a very
> > unusual piper Google has it right.
>
>Interesting - do all pipers play the same way, even left-handed ones?

Mostly, but by no means exclusively. For solo piping it never made any
difference. But with the advent of pipe bands in the 19th century, uniformity
became more necessary (symmetry and, I would think, the hazards of
counter-marching with drones coming at you from both sides of the aisle
being the prime motivators here.)

There are still some folks who play on the right side. It doesn't seem to
have anything to do with being right or left
handed. I'm told it's a "regional"
thing, i.e., the way it's taught in that part of the country. (I'm thinking a
South Uist tradition but feel free to correct me here. The memory isn't
what it used to be. If it ever was.)

And there are some who play with the right hand on top instead of the left. My
friend George plays that way. I played in the same band
with him for 2 years before I noticed. In fact,
to be precise, I never did "notice".
It was pointed out to me.

Cheers,

-John-
Lakewood, California
33.8540° N, 118.1330° W

"The Piper and the Penguin"

Message 48069 · Dick&Maureen Daniel · 3 Feb 2007 16:39:18 · Top

>From: John Cahill
re Question - do all pipers play the same way, even left-handed
>>ones?
Answer
>Mostly, but by no means exclusively. For solo piping it never made any
>difference. But with the advent of pipe bands in the 19th century,
>uniformity
>became more necessary (symmetry and, I would think, the hazards of
>counter-marching with drones coming at you from both sides of the aisle
>being the prime motivators here.)
>
>There are still some folks who play on the right side. It doesn't seem to
>have anything to do with being right or left handed. I'm told it's a
>"regional"
>thing, i.e., the way it's taught in that part of the country. (I'm
>thinking a
>South Uist tradition but feel free to correct me here. The memory isn't
>what it used to be. If it ever was.)
>
>And there are some who play with the right hand on top instead of the left.
> My
>friend George plays that way. I played in the same band
>with him for 2 years before I noticed. In fact, to be precise, I never did
>"notice".
>It was pointed out to me.
>Lakewood, California
>33.8540° N, 118.1330° W
>

Hi John,
Congrats on an extremely interesting and informative response. This is a
subject to which I had never really given any thought before, but I'll have
a new eye for piper practices in future.
Incidentally, the most entertaining pipers I've seen recently were young
lads.
One seemed to have the ability to extend the range of possible notes way
beyond the standard and "bend" notes at will.
The other put on a solo display, where he came literally bounding into and
around the room playing his intro number.
I suppose they were demonstrating the appeal of divergence from the
"Traditional" [Like Ceilidh vs SCD] and the exuberance of youth. That's not
saying that Traditional is a lesser skill of course.
Also interesting to see you using definitive Lat/Long address, but it may be
a little too revealing..
Everyone doesn't embrace the situation of letting the world and his man
"know exactly where you live" [I just checked it out]
Take care out there,
Regards,
Dick Daniel

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"The Piper and the Penguin"

Message 48071 · John Cahill · 4 Feb 2007 01:37:16 · Top

At 07:39 AM 2/3/2007, you wrote:
>Hi John,
>Congrats on an extremely interesting and informative response. This
>is a subject to which I had never really given any thought before,
>but I'll have a new eye for piper practices in future.
>Incidentally, the most entertaining pipers I've seen recently were young lads.
>One seemed to have the ability to extend the range of possible notes
>way beyond the standard and "bend" notes at will.
>The other put on a solo display, where he came literally bounding
>into and around the room playing his intro number.
>I suppose they were demonstrating the appeal of divergence from the
>"Traditional" [Like Ceilidh vs SCD] and the exuberance of
>youth. That's not saying that Traditional is a lesser skill of course.
>Also interesting to see you using definitive Lat/Long address, but
>it may be a little too revealing..
>Everyone doesn't embrace the situation of letting the world and his
>man "know exactly where you live" [I just checked it out]
>Take care out there,
>Regards,
>Dick Daniel

[Veering wildly off topic and hoping because it's Saturday and nothing
much is going on, no-one will notice.]

Ah, yes the young folks with the India rubber fingers. God put them on
earth in order to keep me humble. So I'm told. It actually hasn't worked
so far. They mostly keep me envious.

The note "bending" is an import from the uillean pipe world, greatly frowned
upon by the unco traditional in the highland pipe world. I first
heard it on the
78th's old recording of "Lagan Love". It made the hair on the back of my neck
stand up.

As for extending the scale, there are a few possibilities. The
standard highland
pipe scale has 9 notes: low G through high A. If you think of it as an A major
instrument with a built-in diminished 7th and a built-in augmented 4th and an
G on the bottom you'll have the basics. And then forget about the A having
anything to do with concert pitch A. It's probably closer to concert
pitch B flat
than anything else these days (the pitch has risen steadily over the past 40
years) but it probably isn't really B flat either. Now those who
want to tinker
with that - like the young folks in your example - can do a couple of
things. If
it's properly tuned there is a "false fingering" that can bring the C
down to a C
natural. And on certain chanters with certain reeds a high B can be produced.
Both of those are pretty standard fingerings on lowland or border pipes.
After that, you need to start adding keys and you wind up with a Brian Boru
chanter such as some of the old Irish regiments' pipe bands used.

The lat/long co-ordinates are fairly broad but centered around city hall, IIRC.
Anyone using those to target a smart missile at me is probably going to get
the mayor and the city council instead.

Cheers,

-John-
The piper, not the penguin,
no matter what it looks like in
my Prince Charlie.

"The Piper and the Penguin"

Message 48072 · Pia Walker · 4 Feb 2007 14:50:16 · Top

For piping enthusiasts, I particularly like Hamish and Finn Moore - superb
pipers from Perthshire - they also break the mould with regards to the
regimental style of piping which is what most people know of.

Pia

-----Original Message-----
From: strathspey-bounces-pia=intamail.com@strathspey.org
[mailto:strathspey-bounces-pia=intamail.com@strathspey.org]On Behalf Of John
Cahill
Sent: 04 February 2007 00:37
To: SCD news and discussion
Subject: Re: "The Piper and the Penguin"

At 07:39 AM 2/3/2007, you wrote:
>Hi John,
>Congrats on an extremely interesting and informative response. This
>is a subject to which I had never really given any thought before,
>but I'll have a new eye for piper practices in future.
>Incidentally, the most entertaining pipers I've seen recently were young
lads.
>One seemed to have the ability to extend the range of possible notes
>way beyond the standard and "bend" notes at will.
>The other put on a solo display, where he came literally bounding
>into and around the room playing his intro number.
>I suppose they were demonstrating the appeal of divergence from the
>"Traditional" [Like Ceilidh vs SCD] and the exuberance of
>youth. That's not saying that Traditional is a lesser skill of course.
>Also interesting to see you using definitive Lat/Long address, but
>it may be a little too revealing..
>Everyone doesn't embrace the situation of letting the world and his
>man "know exactly where you live" [I just checked it out]
>Take care out there,
>Regards,
>Dick Daniel

[Veering wildly off topic and hoping because it's Saturday and nothing
much is going on, no-one will notice.]

Ah, yes the young folks with the India rubber fingers. God put them on
earth in order to keep me humble. So I'm told. It actually hasn't worked
so far. They mostly keep me envious.

The note "bending" is an import from the uillean pipe world, greatly frowned
upon by the unco traditional in the highland pipe world. I first
heard it on the
78th's old recording of "Lagan Love". It made the hair on the back of my
neck
stand up.

As for extending the scale, there are a few possibilities. The
standard highland
pipe scale has 9 notes: low G through high A. If you think of it as an A
major
instrument with a built-in diminished 7th and a built-in augmented 4th and
an
G on the bottom you'll have the basics. And then forget about the A having
anything to do with concert pitch A. It's probably closer to concert
pitch B flat
than anything else these days (the pitch has risen steadily over the past 40
years) but it probably isn't really B flat either. Now those who
want to tinker
with that - like the young folks in your example - can do a couple of
things. If
it's properly tuned there is a "false fingering" that can bring the C
down to a C
natural. And on certain chanters with certain reeds a high B can be
produced.
Both of those are pretty standard fingerings on lowland or border pipes.
After that, you need to start adding keys and you wind up with a Brian Boru
chanter such as some of the old Irish regiments' pipe bands used.

The lat/long co-ordinates are fairly broad but centered around city hall,
IIRC.
Anyone using those to target a smart missile at me is probably going to get
the mayor and the city council instead.

Cheers,

-John-
The piper, not the penguin,
no matter what it looks like in
my Prince Charlie.

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"The Piper and the Penguin"

Message 48073 · Dick&Maureen Daniel · 4 Feb 2007 20:21:55 · Top

>John-
>The piper, not the penguin,
>no matter what it looks like in
>my Prince Charlie......wrote....

>Ah, yes the young folks with the India rubber fingers. God put them on
>earth in order to keep me humble. So I'm told. It actually hasn't worked
>so far. They mostly keep me envious.
>The note "bending" is an import from the uillean pipe world, greatly
>frowned
>upon by the unco traditional in the highland pipe world. Anyone using
>those to target a smart missile at me is probably going to get
>the mayor and the city council instead.

>
Thanks John,

I know some trad pipers who do frown on the practices of these youngsters,
but variety is the spice of life [they say]
Getting back to the Piper and the Penguin, I was recently at a dance where
all the women in the set finished this dance by waddling like penguins, with
their arms straight down, and hands sticking out at ninety degrees. I found
it extremely appropriate, hilarious and enchanting.

Any other "Nutty" diversions from defined dances out there??

Regards,
Dick Daniel
Glasgow

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"The Piper and the Penguin"

Message 48074 · Anselm Lingnau · 5 Feb 2007 00:22:07 · Top

Dick Daniel wrote:

> Any other "Nutty" diversions from defined dances out there??

Around here people will often hiss during the appropriate bit of The Snake
Pass. Buzzing in The Bees of Maggieknockater hasn't really caught on so far,
nor has producing train noises in Waverley. I've seen people flapping their
arms in The Flight of the Falcon but am not entirely convinced that it
improves the dance :^)

Anselm
--
Anselm Lingnau, Frankfurt, Germany ..................... anselm@strathspey.org
Second, Mr. "I-Was-Educated-In-Europe": I do TOO know where Vietnam (or, as it
is sometimes called, "Indonesia") is located: It is located overseas.
-- Dave Barry, *Map-wise readers catch geographical `gaff'*

"The Piper and the Penguin"

Message 48077 · Don Andrews · 5 Feb 2007 10:01:21 · Top

Hissing in the Snake Pass? No need. It's a winding moorland road, not
uncommonly blocked with snow, ice, fog, etc, between Sheffield and
Manchester (England).
Cheers
Don Andrews
(Leeds - England)
----- Original Message -----
From: "Anselm Lingnau" <anselm@strathspey.org>
To: "SCD news and discussion" <strathspey@strathspey.org>
Sent: Sunday, February 04, 2007 11:22 PM
Subject: Re: "The Piper and the Penguin"

> Dick Daniel wrote:
>
>> Any other "Nutty" diversions from defined dances out there??
>
> Around here people will often hiss during the appropriate bit of The Snake
> Pass. Buzzing in The Bees of Maggieknockater hasn't really caught on so
> far,
> nor has producing train noises in Waverley. I've seen people flapping
> their
> arms in The Flight of the Falcon but am not entirely convinced that it
> improves the dance :^)
>
> Anselm
> --
> Anselm Lingnau, Frankfurt, Germany .....................
> anselm@strathspey.org
> Second, Mr. "I-Was-Educated-In-Europe": I do TOO know where Vietnam (or,
> as it
> is sometimes called, "Indonesia") is located: It is located overseas.
> -- Dave Barry, *Map-wise readers catch geographical
> `gaff'*
>

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The Snake Pass

Message 48079 · Anselm Lingnau · 5 Feb 2007 11:49:01 · Top

Don Andrews wrote:

> Hissing in the Snake Pass? No need. It's a winding moorland road, not
> uncommonly blocked with snow, ice, fog, etc, between Sheffield and
> Manchester (England).

That figures. The sound must be that of the air escaping a punctured tyre :^)

Anselm
--
Anselm Lingnau, Frankfurt, Germany ..................... anselm@strathspey.org
Dost thou love life? Then do not squander time; for that's the stuff life is
made of. -- Benjamin Franklin

New Scotland .. was "The Piper and the Penguin"

Message 48095 · simon scott · 6 Feb 2007 01:47:57 · Top

When the dance "New Scotland Strathspey" was popular (late 70's I think) I
saw a very funny Ceilidh act at Pinewoods Week. In the intimate wood
building near the lake eight young dancers came out to dance the "Nude
Scotland Strathspey". They were all attired in a white towel and performed
the dance beautifully. On the final chord all the lights in the place went
out leaving everyone in total darkness. When, after a moment, the lights
came on again, there were only eight white towels left on the floor.
Simon
Vancouver

Dick Daniel wrote:

> Any other "Nutty" diversions from defined dances out there??

Around here people will often hiss during the appropriate bit of The Snake
Pass. Buzzing in The Bees of Maggieknockater hasn't really caught on so far,

nor has producing train noises in Waverley. I've seen people flapping their
arms in The Flight of the Falcon but am not entirely convinced that it
improves the dance :^)

Anselm

New Scotland .. was "The Piper and the Penguin"

Message 48096 · Parbleuoui · 6 Feb 2007 13:26:35 · Top

In einer eMail vom 06.02.2007 01:49:12 Westeuropäische Normalzeit schreibt
simon.scott@telus.net:

> Buzzing in The Bees of Maggieknockater hasn't really caught on so far,
>
> nor has producing train noises in Waverley. I've seen people flapping their
> arms in The Flight of the Falcon but am not entirely convinced that it
> improves the dance :^)
>
> Anselm
>

New Scotland .. was "The Piper and the Penguin"

Message 48097 · Parbleuoui · 6 Feb 2007 13:29:46 · Top

In einer eMail vom 06.02.2007 01:49:12 Westeuropäische Normalzeit schreibt
simon.scott@telus.net:

> Buzzing in The Bees of Maggieknockater hasn't really caught on so far,
>
> nor has producing train noises in Waverley. I've seen people flapping their
> arms in The Flight of the Falcon but am not entirely convinced that it
> improves the dance :^)
>
> Anselm
>

...much mistaken, Anselm! You should have heard Keith 'playing the bee' last
September in Cologne!
We all tried it then, he was better!!
Or join us when we 're dancing the Wild Goose Chase -- but don't forget your
wings!

It's so lovely!

Gabrielle

'The Piper and the Penguin'

Message 48075 · campbell · 5 Feb 2007 08:35:07 · Top

Dick wrote:

> This is a
> subject to which I had never really given any thought before, but I'll
> have
> a new eye for piper practices in future.

Me too. I had the pleasure of attending a Burns Supper on Saturday
(evidently the third biggest in the world) where the Cape Town Highlanders
were in attendance. We are fortunate to have a band of this quality here,
they are currently receiving regular annual invitations to the Edinburgh
Tatoo. Unfortunately I only received John's email this morning and so
didnt check out which hand was on top, but I was able to confirm that the
whole band had their pipes on their left hand side.

> Incidentally, the most entertaining pipers I've seen recently were young
> lads.

The CT Highlanders showcased their youngest recruit, an 11 year old
drummer, who dazzled us with his drumming technique. All their drummers
interestingly are from the section of our South African population who
were denied such opportunities in earlier years. As a consequence (?)
they introduced us to their new range of musical pieces which they
classified as Afro-Celt Fusion! Lovely stuff. The Highland dancers who
performed were also dancing to non-traditional music such as selections
from Runrig.

By the way, is the huge gap evident here between Burns Supper organisers
and Scottish Country Dancers the same elsewhere? It was bizarre to find
the evening ending with a disco and not a suggestion of even a Strip the
Willow. The two groups dont seem to talk to each other at all.

Campbell Tyler
Cape Town

'The Piper and the Penguin'

Message 48076 · Pia Walker · 5 Feb 2007 09:47:22 · Top

Would you not also have to arrange the drones differently - if you have the
bag under the other arm, your base-drone would be to the outside - as it is
heaver than the others, it would threaten to fall down at all times.

I didn't think that dancing was part of the Burns tradition at all.
Although it is nice when it happens. And am I much mistaken in that it is
an old male tradition? In the same style as funerals - i.e. women are not
allowed to be in on the fun.

Pia

-----Original Message-----
From: strathspey-bounces-pia=intamail.com@strathspey.org
[mailto:strathspey-bounces-pia=intamail.com@strathspey.org]On Behalf Of
Campbell Tyler
Sent: 05 February 2007 07:35
To: SCD news and discussion
Subject: Re: 'The Piper and the Penguin'

Dick wrote:

> This is a
> subject to which I had never really given any thought before, but I'll
> have
> a new eye for piper practices in future.

Me too. I had the pleasure of attending a Burns Supper on Saturday
(evidently the third biggest in the world) where the Cape Town Highlanders
were in attendance. We are fortunate to have a band of this quality here,
they are currently receiving regular annual invitations to the Edinburgh
Tatoo. Unfortunately I only received John's email this morning and so
didnt check out which hand was on top, but I was able to confirm that the
whole band had their pipes on their left hand side.

> Incidentally, the most entertaining pipers I've seen recently were young
> lads.

The CT Highlanders showcased their youngest recruit, an 11 year old
drummer, who dazzled us with his drumming technique. All their drummers
interestingly are from the section of our South African population who
were denied such opportunities in earlier years. As a consequence (?)
they introduced us to their new range of musical pieces which they
classified as Afro-Celt Fusion! Lovely stuff. The Highland dancers who
performed were also dancing to non-traditional music such as selections
from Runrig.

By the way, is the huge gap evident here between Burns Supper organisers
and Scottish Country Dancers the same elsewhere? It was bizarre to find
the evening ending with a disco and not a suggestion of even a Strip the
Willow. The two groups dont seem to talk to each other at all.

Campbell Tyler
Cape Town

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'The Piper and the Penguin'

Message 48085 · John Cahill · 5 Feb 2007 18:53:03 · Top

At 12:47 AM 2/5/2007, Pia wrote:
>Would you not also have to arrange the drones differently - if you have the
>bag under the other arm, your base-drone would be to the outside - as it is
>heaver than the others, it would threaten to fall down at all times.

Yes, indeed. The drone stocks would have to be tied in differently and the
blow stem angled toward the left rather than the right. And with the growing
popularity of synthetic bags with their pre-cut holes, an already rare way of
playing pipes will no doubt become even more so.

Cheers,

-John-
Lakewood, California
33.8540° N, 118.1330° W

Burns' suppers

Message 48078 · Andrew Smith · 5 Feb 2007 11:25:48 · Top

Campbell Tyler wrote:
"By the way, is the huge gap evident here between Burns Supper organisers
and Scottish Country Dancers the same elsewhere? It was bizarre to find
the evening ending with a disco and not a suggestion of even a Strip the
Willow. The two groups dont seem to talk to each other at all."
I am pleased to report that RSCDS-Bristol has just held its 7th Burns Supper
and Dance, and our programme, to live music, is generally designed to cater
for both dancers (principally) and non-dancers, so that non-dancing partners
and friends can, and do, come along and enjoy themselves as well. Tickets
are usually sold out a month before.
Andrew,
Bristol, UK.

Burns' suppers

Message 48080 · Anselm Lingnau · 5 Feb 2007 11:55:20 · Top

Andrew Smith schrieb:

> I am pleased to report that RSCDS-Bristol has just held its 7th Burns
> Supper and Dance, and our programme, to live music, is generally designed
> to cater for both dancers (principally) and non-dancers, so that
> non-dancing partners and friends can, and do, come along and enjoy
> themselves as well. Tickets are usually sold out a month before.

This year we had the opportunity to take a team of musicians and dancers to a
Burns night held by the officers of an RAF unit near Ramstein (a large
military air base 150km or so south-west of Frankfurt). The good people there
wanted to have some dancing for the first time and had asked us to provide
music and instruction (calling) for Ceilidh dancing. It was very good fun
although the actual dinner, speeches etc. went on to about midnight before
the dancing would even start, at which point some of those attending had to
be propped up in their chairs :^)

It seems that whether there is dancing at a Burns supper depends largely on
whether the participants are interested in dancing. Presumably the Bard
himself wouldn't have minded strutting his fancy stuff if the opportunity
arose, so who's to complain? As for Burns suppers being all-male affairs,
then who is going to reply to the »Toast to the Lassies«? :^)

Anselm
--
Anselm Lingnau, Frankfurt, Germany ..................... anselm@strathspey.org
You can create a good impression on yourself by being right, [...] but for
creating a good impression on others there's nothing to beat being totally
and catastrophically wrong. -- Michael Frayn

Burns' suppers

Message 48081 · campbell · 5 Feb 2007 12:36:13 · Top

Anselm wrote:

>As for Burns suppers being all-male affairs,
> then who is going to reply to the »Toast to the Lassies«? :^)

Evidently in Cape Town until about 10 years ago lassies were not invited
and so it was left to a man to reply to the toast - ????!!! I am only
reporting what I was told on Saturday.

Campbell Tyler
Cape Town

Burns' suppers

Message 48082 · Tait Family · 5 Feb 2007 12:22:51 · Top

Anselm,
traditionally in Scotland all Burns Suppers were men only affairs so of
course the reply to the Lassies was given by a man - it has become accepted
for women to attend and take part in Burns Suppers and given the
responsibility to reply to the toast to them. Here in Melbourne, Victoria,
one Caledonian Society even held an all female Burns Supper (gentlemen were
invited of course) where only women did all the mens' roles as well as their
own! It was a "one off" occasion, but good fun. I know for a fact - being
a SCD teacher as well as a Burns Club secretary here in Melbourne, that
there are several all male Burns Suppers still held annually in Scotland.

kind regards,

Bev Tait
----- Original Message -----
From: "Anselm Lingnau" <anselm@strathspey.org>
To: "SCD news and discussion" <strathspey@strathspey.org>
Sent: Monday, February 05, 2007 9:55 PM
Subject: Re: Burns' suppers

Andrew Smith schrieb:
> I am pleased to report that RSCDS-Bristol has just held its 7th Burns
> Supper and Dance, and our programme, to live music, is generally designed
> to cater for both dancers (principally) and non-dancers, so that
> non-dancing partners and friends can, and do, come along and enjoy
> themselves as well. Tickets are usually sold out a month before.

This year we had the opportunity to take a team of musicians and dancers to
a
Burns night held by the officers of an RAF unit near Ramstein (a large
military air base 150km or so south-west of Frankfurt). The good people
there
wanted to have some dancing for the first time and had asked us to provide
music and instruction (calling) for Ceilidh dancing. It was very good fun
although the actual dinner, speeches etc. went on to about midnight before
the dancing would even start, at which point some of those attending had to
be propped up in their chairs :^)

It seems that whether there is dancing at a Burns supper depends largely on
whether the participants are interested in dancing. Presumably the Bard
himself wouldn't have minded strutting his fancy stuff if the opportunity
arose, so who's to complain? As for Burns suppers being all-male affairs,
then who is going to reply to the »Toast to the Lassies«? :^)

Anselm
--
Anselm Lingnau, Frankfurt, Germany .....................
anselm@strathspey.org
You can create a good impression on yourself by being right, [...] but for
creating a good impression on others there's nothing to beat being totally
and catastrophically wrong. -- Michael
Frayn

Burns' suppers

Message 48083 · Jim Healy · 5 Feb 2007 13:49:51 · Top

Greetings!

Just recovering from Saturday's (late) Scottish Dancing Cote d'Azur Burns Night in Mougins. A fun night that is very much along the lines described by Anselm. A mixed crowd of RSCDS style dancers and friends who come along for a Scottish evening. The haggis is addressed and ceremonially disembowelled but there is no Immortal Memory or Toast to the Lassies. (Aside: my experience of lassies replying to that toast is that they regularly wipe the floor with the men). A mix of ballroom, ceilidh and RSCDS-style dances with a musician brought out from Scotland for the occasion. A great night and never mind the sore feet from the hard floor.

Jim Healy
Monaco and Perth


Burns' suppers

Message 48094 · simon scott · 6 Feb 2007 01:23:14 · Top

Presumably the Bard
himself wouldn't have minded strutting his fancy stuff if the opportunity
arose, so who's to complain? As for Burns suppers being all-male affairs,
then who is going to reply to the >Toast to the Lassies<? :^)

Anselm

I believe I'm right in saying that traditionally Burns Clubs and Suppers
were often, or usually, men only. Some still are. It was the tradition
that a man would give the reply to the lassies on their behalf.

In the past century or so lassies have become more involved in the military,
pipe bands, police and fire forces, business, politics, society, etc, etc,
They have also taken more part in Burns events and suppers, so they now give
their own reply, often very well and humorously.

As for dancing, the Vancouver RSCDS Branch dance program is all SCDing, some
easier ones are included for visitors who may attend. There are other Burns
Suppers held in the city, maybe two dozen plus others. At them there may be
other dancing or none at all.

Simon
Vancouver

Test Please ignore

Message 48122 · Thomas G. Mungall, III · 20 Feb 2007 00:18:59 · Top

Test

There hasn't been a post since February 8 from what I can tell.

Tom

Burns Night was 'The Piper and the Penguin'

Message 48087 · Thomas G. Mungall, III · 5 Feb 2007 20:45:57 · Top

Campbell,

No gap here in Louisiana. I attended both the Baton Rouge and New Orleans
Burns Nights. We had Scottish Country Dancing at both events. At the Baton
Rouge Burns Supper, hosted by the Caledonian Society of Baton Rouge, the
local SCD group did three demo dances and we had only one general
participation dance. I've noticed that in more recent years the Baton Rouge
Burns Night has gotten away from having ballroom & disco dancing in favor of
strictly ceilidh & country dancing. I personally like a wee bit of it all.

At the New Orleans Caledonian Society's Burns Night, the New Orleans RSCDS
group did a few demo dances, but we also had quite a number of general
participation country & ceilidh dances as well. In the past, prior to
Hurricane Katrina, the New Orleans Burns Night was usually held in a posh
country club or university owned ballroom and included several hours of
general dancing which included Scottish ceilidh, country, popular, disco and
ballroom dancing.

Post-Katrina, the New Orleans Caledonian Society has been, like the city in
general, in a rebuilding mode. I understand that there are still society
members that we do not know their whereabouts! Just trying to find a
location for the event is tough even a year and a half on. Many of the past
venues were either damaged or destroyed. Restaurants, country clubs,
ballrooms and convention centers in New Orleans have a tough time getting
wait & kitchen help which drives the cost through the roof. Last year's
Burns Night was very small and held in a church's parish hall where,
post-Katrina, our SCD group has been removed to. It was a pot-luck
(self-catered) dinner of Scottish and New Orleans favorites. We had to
remove the tables and chairs after dinner in order to dance. This year's
event was much the same, except it was held in the church's gym which is
larger.

Yours aye,
Tom Mungall
Baton Rouge, La, USA

----- Original Message -----
From: "Campbell Tyler" <campbell@tyler.co.za>
> By the way, is the huge gap evident here between Burns Supper organisers
> and Scottish Country Dancers the same elsewhere? It was bizarre to find
> the evening ending with a disco and not a suggestion of even a Strip the
> Willow. The two groups dont seem to talk to each other at all.

Burns Night

Message 48099 · Andrew Buxton · 7 Feb 2007 16:18:38 · Top

"University owned ballrooms" on a par with "posh country clubs" - this is a different world from academia in the UK!

Andrew Buxton
University of Sussex

"Thomas G. Mungall, III" <atheling@cox.net> wrote:

In the past, prior to Hurricane Katrina, the New Orleans Burns Night was usually held in a posh country club or university owned ballroom and included several hours of general dancing which included Scottish ceilidh, country, popular, disco and
ballroom dancing.


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Burns Night

Message 48100 · Thomas G. Mungall, III · 7 Feb 2007 18:03:47 · Top

Andrew,
The facilities were quite different. The food that was catered at the
University of New Orleans (UNO) Ballroom actually cost less than it did at
the country club but was actually better in many respects. Here in Baton
Rouge, Louisiana State University (LSU) has a facility called the Faculty
Club which is actually open to the public and the food there is as good as
many of the better restaurants around here. American Universities are quite
a bit different from British institutions of the same name.
Tom Mungall
Baton Rouge, La, USA

----- Original Message -----
From: "Andrew Buxton" <andrew.buxton@yahoo.co.uk>

"University owned ballrooms" on a par with "posh country clubs" - this is a
different world from academia in the UK!

Andrew Buxton
University of Sussex

"Thomas G. Mungall, III" <atheling@cox.net> wrote:

In the past, prior to Hurricane Katrina, the New Orleans Burns Night was
usually held in a posh country club or university owned ballroom and
included several hours of general dancing which included Scottish ceilidh,
country, popular, disco and
ballroom dancing.

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'The Piper and the Penguin'

Message 48098 · Dick&Maureen Daniel · 7 Feb 2007 13:36:43 · Top

Campbell Tyler wrote....
>Subject: Re: 'The Piper and the Penguin'
>Date: Mon, 5 Feb 2007 09:35:07 +0200 (SAST)

>By the way, is the huge gap evident here between Burns Supper organisers
>and Scottish Country Dancers the same elsewhere? It was bizarre to find
>the evening ending with a disco and not a suggestion of even a Strip the
>Willow. The two groups dont seem to talk to each other at all.
>
>The gap does tend to exist [In my experience in Scotland] between RSCDS
>[Not a complaint, but an observation] and Burns Suppers, but most Ceilidh
>and non-RSCDS [including RSCDS Associated Clubs] SCDs have a Burns night
>dance [though not necessarily on the correct night - just the nearest to it
>they can arrange]. These are primarily dancing, with a token Burns Supper
>in the middle of the night's programme. "Proper" Burns suppers are
>generally a far more serious affair along pretty strict procedural
>guidelines and invariably on the correct night. They frequently include
>very little dancing or only "ceilidh" dances - [never known one with any
>other kind of dancing though Old Tyme and Ballroom are common to ceilidhs].
> The "piping in" of the haggis, address to the haggis, Tae the Lassies and
>retort are almost invariably incorporated, together with "Burns"
>recitations and "Burns" songs.

Regards,
Dick Daniel,
Glasgow

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"The Piper and the Penguin"

Message 48012 · Andrew Buxton · 30 Jan 2007 15:10:08 · Top

It looks on the photo as though the peguin is secured to stop it escaping from the music!

Andrew Buxton
Brighton, UK

Sophie Rickebusch <sophie.rickebusch@free.fr> wrote:
If you enter "piper" and "penguin" in Google pictures, you will find the photo
which inspired the title of the dance. It is also reproduced in the "Scotia
suite" book from which the dance is taken (for more details about the book and
how it came about, see http://www.rscds.org/shop/scotiast.htm ).

I've taught it to dancers in Switzerland and in France and they enjoyed it too.

Sophie

Selon cputt@staff.ednet.ns.ca:

> We've been doing this in my class over the last couple of weeks, and
> the dancers really like it. I got the instructions from dance cribs
> and the ever-useful Pilling. I know it's a Goldring dance, but the
> dancers and I are intrigued by the title. Can anyone enlighten me
> about the inspiration?

--
Sophie Rickebusch
FR - St Martin d'Heres


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"The Piper and the Penguin"

Message 48009 · Anselm Lingnau · 30 Jan 2007 14:40:53 · Top

Colleen Putt wrote:

> I know it's a Goldring dance, but the
> dancers and I are intrigued by the title. Can anyone enlighten me
> about the inspiration?

The dance is from a publication titled

THE SCOTIA SUITE OF SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCES

honouring the achievements of

WILLIAM SPEIRS BRUCE

and commemorating

THE VOYAGE OF THE SCOTIA

The research vessel of

THE SCOTTISH NATIONAL ANTARCTIC EXPEDITION
1902-1904

etc. etc., put out by the RSCDS together with the Royal Scottish Geographic
Society, on the occasion of the expedition's centenary in 2002. On the page
with the dance there is an actual photograph of the man and bird.

According to [1], the piper in question is Gilbert Kerr, and I'm sure it is on
account of the unaccustomed volume of sound rather than the quality of his
playing that the penguin in the picture is apparently tied to a weight to
prevent its escape! The penguin's mien does give the impression that it would
rather leave. (Unfortunately the photograph itself isn't on-line, but if you
search around the site you can find a picture containing some members of the
expedition bringing in a crate of penguins captured in order to record their
voices on phonograph.)

The Scotia Suite contains seven dances by Roy Goldring, all of which are on
the easy side but rather nice -- what you would expect from their
devi^H^H^H^Hauthor. There is also original music by Muriel Johnstone, which
has been recorded by Neil Barron on a CD available from the Society.

Anselm

[1]
http://www.nahste.ac.uk/cgi-bin/view_isad.pl?id=GB-0248-DC-404-831&view=basic
--
Anselm Lingnau, Frankfurt, Germany ..................... anselm@strathspey.org
The trouble with the rat race is that even if you win, you're still a rat.
-- Lily Tomlin

"The Piper and the Penguin"

Message 48015 · Steve Wyrick · 30 Jan 2007 16:39:16 · Top

On Tue, 30 Jan 2007 14:40:53 +0100
Anselm Lingnau <anselm@strathspey.org> wrote:
...There is also original music by Muriel Johnstone, which
> has been recorded by Neil Barron on a CD available from the Society.
>

Although I understand that the tune that the Society picked for the dance
isn't the one that Muriel intended to be used for it... -Steve
--
Steve Wyrick - Concord, California

"The Piper and the Penguin"

Message 48017 · Rebecca Sager · 30 Jan 2007 17:58:01 · Top

And let me (again) recommend The Music Makars' interpretation on their CD Catch the Wind - with The Black Bear for the middle portion - it makes the dance for me!
Becky

Becky Sager
Marietta GA USA

-- Steve Wyrick <sjwyrick@ca.astound.net> wrote:
On Tue, 30 Jan 2007 14:40:53 +0100
Anselm Lingnau <anselm@strathspey.org> wrote:
...There is also original music by Muriel Johnstone, which
> has been recorded by Neil Barron on a CD available from the Society.
>

Although I understand that the tune that the Society picked for the dance
isn't the one that Muriel intended to be used for it... -Steve
--
Steve Wyrick - Concord, California

"The Piper and the Penguin"

Message 48010 · Cord Walter · 30 Jan 2007 14:48:13 · Top

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Hash: SHA1

cputt@staff.ednet.ns.ca wrote:
> We've been doing this in my class over the last couple of weeks, and the
> dancers really like it. I got the instructions from dance cribs and the
> ever-useful Pilling. I know it's a Goldring dance, but the dancers and I
> are intrigued by the title. Can anyone enlighten me about the inspiration?

The dance is from the Collection "The Scotia Suite" [1], the title
references a photograph [2] of - exactly - a piper and a penguin in the
antarctic [3]. Apparently it was a popular postcard motive back then.

- -cord

[1] http://www.rscds.org/shop/scotiast.htm
[2] http://static.flickr.com/74/159878815_f6a920accb_m.jpg
[3] For reasons unknown the penguin is chained to the piper's led ;)
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