strathspey Archive: Question about dances

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Question about dances

Message 44778 · Victor Jason Raymond · 20 Mar 2006 20:41:15 · Top

Dear All,

I probably ought to ask Linda Lieberman this question, but I'll toss
it out here. Forgive me if I'm just incapable of finding dances on my own.

I'm looking for dances that include the following figure (and I
suspect it is a small number):

At *some* point in the dance, the first couple dances down, picking
up second lady as they go by: 2L-1M-1L. As they are dancing down,
second man follows behind first man. They all turn over their
(right?) shoulders and dance up the line of the dance, the two ladies
stepping forward to be on either side of second man, with first man
now trailing. I don't recall how the figure ends, as there might be
several ways to finish.

If anyone might point me towards dances with this figure, I would be
grateful. Thank you. (Suggestions on how to search for this stuff
would also be appreciated)

Victor

Victor J Raymond
vraymond "at" iastate.edu

Question about dances

Message 44784 · Chris1Ronald · 20 Mar 2006 22:18:03 · Top

Victor,

If it was the second man leading down with the two ladies and the first man
trailing, and the men reversing roles on the way back up, I would think of
The Glasgow Highlanders. If it was first man leading the ladies down with
second man in front of them, dancing backwards, and the men reversing roles on
the way back, I would think of The Royal Albert Country Dance. But I cannot
off the top of my head think of any dance that exactly fits your description.

I hope that helps, anyway,

Chris, New York.

Question about dances

Message 44785 · Thomas G. Mungall, III · 20 Mar 2006 22:32:49 · Top

Victor,

Possibly "The Triumph"?

Tom Mungall
Baton Rouge, La, USA

----- Original Message -----
From: "Victor Raymond" <vraymond@iastate.edu>

> I'm looking for dances that include the following figure (and I
> suspect it is a small number):
>
> At *some* point in the dance, the first couple dances down, picking
> up second lady as they go by: 2L-1M-1L. As they are dancing down,
> second man follows behind first man.

Question about dances

Message 44793 · elissa h · 21 Mar 2006 01:28:51 · Top

That's the one I was thinking of too!

Oh, and I don't like that dance much, either. :-)

On Mar 20, 2006, at 4:32 PM, Thomas G. Mungall, III wrote:

> Victor,
>
> Possibly "The Triumph"?
>
> Tom Mungall
> Baton Rouge, La, USA
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Victor Raymond" <vraymond@iastate.edu>
>
>
>> I'm looking for dances that include the following figure (and I
>> suspect it is a small number):
>>
>> At *some* point in the dance, the first couple dances down, picking
>> up second lady as they go by: 2L-1M-1L. As they are dancing down,
>> second man follows behind first man.

The Triumph

Message 44796 · Sophie Rickebusch · 21 Mar 2006 08:52:45 · Top

Except in The Triumph you have only 2 people leading down (2M+1W) and 3 leading
up (1M who was following joins with the other two in "Triumph" hold)

It's one of those "love it or hate it" dances, I think... I personally quite
like it as it's a bit different but not too strenuous (ie. interesting enough
for first couple, but gives the others the chance to rest), so it works well
towards the end of a dance programme. I would probably get fed up with it if it
appeared too often though.

Sophie

> That's the one I was thinking of too!

> > Possibly "The Triumph"?

> >> At *some* point in the dance, the first couple dances down, picking
> >> up second lady as they go by: 2L-1M-1L. As they are dancing down,
> >> second man follows behind first man.

--
Sophie Rickebusch
CH - Wettswil a. A.

The Triumph

Message 44798 · Fiona Grant · 21 Mar 2006 09:17:36 · Top

Elissa writes:
Oh, and I don't like that dance much, either. :-)

Hi Elissa

Some dances are fascinating from a historical point of view though, and this
often changes how I feel about dancing them.

Some Cornish dancers told me that in their part of the country The Triumph
is a wedding dance, and there are lots of variations or triumphs throughout
the British Isles. The first couple represent the bride and groom, the
second the brides parents, the third the grooms parents and the fourth the
best man and maid.

See: http://www.an-daras.com/dance/d_danceindex_p_triumph.htm

Best wishes
Fiona
Bristol, Sout West England.

More info from website above:

TRIUMPH: BACKGROUND INFORMATION

Informant: Mrs Baker, Rilla Mill, 1981

Old Cornwall Society Magazine (1925 31) The Recorder of the Old Cornwall
Society summarizes a lecture concerning the West Looe May Fair held in a
field (or barn if wet) the Triumph along with the Cushion dance are referred
to as stately, being slow and graceful. She comments that the Triumph was
still being done in Looe (i.e. 1925 1930) and that the other dances named
were last used in the district down to about '25 years ago'. Other dances
mentioned are the four handed, six handed and eight handed reels noted
elsewhere in Corollyn. Unfortunately these dances seemed to have been viewed
as fairly commonplace by the Looe Old Cornwall Society and not worth noting
in detail. Mrs Baker, whom we met in May 1981 (?), could remember the
Triumph being done when she was a small girl. She was unable to describe the
moves or pattern but she was emphatic about the steps which were a vigorous
stamp hop, as she demonstrated to us in her wellington boots! The Triumph is
a fairly well known British dance with variants recorded from Scotland down
to Cornwall. Sometimes called the 'Old Triumph' it is listed as a Berkshire
long ways set in the Carey manuscripts, La Triumph in the 'Ladies Pocket
Book' by Stalker and the Triumph quadrille in Blessi's art of dancing l831.
Cecil Sharp noted this dance as did Bult in 'Old Devon Dances'. These are
all kept at the Vaughan Williams memorial library, Cecil Sharp House and
make fascinating reading. In order to add `flesh` to the references we had
to triumph we borrowed the pattern of the dance as noted by Bult. With some
reservation it might be added as this clearly comes from the wrong side of
the Tamar! People unfamiliar with this part of Cornwall might feel that
geography is on our side as the moves we have borrowed come from but a few
miles further East. Culture is not on our side, however, as there continues
a strong tendency in this area to disassociate with traditions English and
Devonshire over the Tamar border. Mrs Baker describes a 'stamp hop' hornpipe
step and this we have used, hopefully reconstructing the vigorous dance she
remembers. DANCE NOTATIONS Formation

A three couple long ways set. Step: A Stamp Hop step throughout. Bars (A)

1 8 First Lady and second man lead down the centre of the dance while first
man crosses the set and goes down behind the ladies. First and second man
bring lady back up the centre lady holds outside hands of both men, they
join inside hands to form an arch over her head. First lady is returned to
her place.
9 16 Repeat bars 1 8, this time with second lady and first man leading down
the set and second man crossing to go down behind the ladies. (B)
17 24 Head Couple lead down the set and return.
25 32 Head couple swing down the set (elbow link) and as they pass each
couple casts UP the set and swings until all the couples are swinging. Dance
is repeated three times

TUNE/SONG The suggested tunes for this dance are Syans Den Bal, Zeak Waltz
and Maggie May's Hornpipe, although any 32 bar Hornpipe would be suitable.

The Triumph

Message 44801 · mlamontbrown · 21 Mar 2006 09:59:52 · Top

Fiona wrote:

> Some Cornish dancers told me that in their part of the country The Triumph
> is a wedding dance, and there are lots of variations or triumphs throughout
> the British Isles. The first couple represent the bride and groom, the
> second the brides parents, the third the grooms parents and the fourth the
> best man and maid.

There is a description of this dance in Under the Greenwood Tree by Thomas Hardy
(Chapter Seven - The Tranter's Party) published in 1872 -
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/2662/2662.txt for those people who don't have a copy
to hand. (Bill Ireland pointed this out to us at St Andrews about 10 years ago)

Malcolm L Brown
York

2 chords

Message 44830 · Mike Mudrey · 22 Mar 2006 01:32:00 · Top

Without at least one chord....How does one acknowledge ones partner?

2 chords

Message 44831 · L. Friedman-Shedlov · 22 Mar 2006 05:27:25 · Top

On Tue, 21 Mar 2006, M.G. Mudrey, Jr. wrote:

> Without at least one chord....How does one acknowledge ones partner?
>

No one is suggesting that there isn't at least one chord. We are simply
suggesting that there needn't be two chords.

/ Lara

********************************
Lara Friedman~Shedlov "Librarians -- Like Google, but
ldfs@bigfoot.com warm-blooded"
********************************

>
>
>

The Triumph

Message 44833 · elissa h · 22 Mar 2006 11:33:24 · Top

Thanks for the great background information. It certainly makes it
more interesting.

Elissa
On Mar 21, 2006, at 3:17 AM, Fiona Grant wrote:

>
>
> Some dances are fascinating from a historical point of view though,
> and this
> often changes how I feel about dancing them.
>
> Some Cornish dancers told me that in their part of the country The
> Triumph
> is a wedding dance, and there are lots of variations or triumphs
> throughout
> the British Isles. The first couple represent the bride and groom, the
> second the brides parents, the third the grooms parents and the
> fourth the
> best man and maid.
>

The Triumph

Message 44843 · Fiona Grant · 22 Mar 2006 20:04:19 · Top

Malcolm wrote:
There is a description of this dance in Under the Greenwood Tree by Thomas
Hardy
(Chapter Seven - The Tranter's Party) published in 1872 -
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/2662/2662.txt for those people who don't have
a copy to hand. (Bill Ireland pointed this out to us at St Andrews about 10
years ago)

Hi Malcolm
This is one of the most eloquent, entertaining, exhilarating descriptions of
country dancing I have ever read! It's worth reading the next chapter too:
CHAPTER VIII: THEY DANCE MORE WILDLY

Many thanks for sharing the link with us.
Fiona
Bristol, UK

Under the Greenwood Tree

Message 44844 · Anselm Lingnau · 22 Mar 2006 20:30:26 · Top

Fiona Grant wrote:

> This is one of the most eloquent, entertaining, exhilarating descriptions
> of country dancing I have ever read!

I've put chapters 7 and 8 of the book on the Strathspey Server; you can get it
from the »History« section (for lack of a better place to put it).

Anselm
--
Anselm Lingnau, Frankfurt, Germany ..................... anselm@strathspey.org
Love is a fire. But whether it is going to warm your hearth or burn down your
house, you can never tell. -- Joan Crawford

Question about dances

Message 44803 · Wesley Harry · 21 Mar 2006 11:20:36 · Top

Sounds like Glasgow Highlanders.
Do you need a copy of the original instructions? If so mail me.
Regards,
Wesley

----- Original Message -----
From: "Victor Raymond" <vraymond@iastate.edu>
To: <strathspey@strathspey.org>
Sent: Monday, March 20, 2006 7:41 PM
Subject: Question about dances

> Dear All,
>
> I probably ought to ask Linda Lieberman this question, but I'll toss it
> out here. Forgive me if I'm just incapable of finding dances on my own.
>
> I'm looking for dances that include the following figure (and I suspect it
> is a small number):
>
> At *some* point in the dance, the first couple dances down, picking up
> second lady as they go by: 2L-1M-1L. As they are dancing down, second man
> follows behind first man. They all turn over their (right?) shoulders and
> dance up the line of the dance, the two ladies stepping forward to be on
> either side of second man, with first man now trailing. I don't recall
> how the figure ends, as there might be several ways to finish.
>
> If anyone might point me towards dances with this figure, I would be
> grateful. Thank you. (Suggestions on how to search for this stuff would
> also be appreciated)
>
> Victor
>
>
> Victor J Raymond
> vraymond "at" iastate.edu

UNSUBSCRIBE

Message 44839 · B McIntyre · 22 Mar 2006 18:30:48 · Top

Wesley Harry <wesharry@tiscali.co.uk> wrote: Sounds like Glasgow Highlanders.
Do you need a copy of the original instructions? If so mail me.
Regards,
Wesley

----- Original Message -----
From: "Victor Raymond"
To:
Sent: Monday, March 20, 2006 7:41 PM
Subject: Question about dances

> Dear All,
>
> I probably ought to ask Linda Lieberman this question, but I'll toss it
> out here. Forgive me if I'm just incapable of finding dances on my own.
>
> I'm looking for dances that include the following figure (and I suspect it
> is a small number):
>
> At *some* point in the dance, the first couple dances down, picking up
> second lady as they go by: 2L-1M-1L. As they are dancing down, second man
> follows behind first man. They all turn over their (right?) shoulders and
> dance up the line of the dance, the two ladies stepping forward to be on
> either side of second man, with first man now trailing. I don't recall
> how the figure ends, as there might be several ways to finish.
>
> If anyone might point me towards dances with this figure, I would be
> grateful. Thank you. (Suggestions on how to search for this stuff would
> also be appreciated)
>
> Victor
>
>
> Victor J Raymond
> vraymond "at" iastate.edu


---------------------------------
Relax. Yahoo! Mail virus scanning helps detect nasty viruses!

UNSUBSCRIBE

Message 44868 · George Watt · 24 Mar 2006 16:20:47 · Top

George Watt.
4 Ancrum Drive,
Dundee.
DD2 2JB
Scotland.

tel. 01382 642131

>From: B McIntyre <abonnyscot@yahoo.com>
>Reply-To: SCD news and discussion <strathspey@strathspey.org>
>To: SCD news and discussion <strathspey@strathspey.org>
>Subject: UNSUBSCRIBE
>Date: Wed, 22 Mar 2006 09:30:48 -0800 (PST)
>
>
>
>Wesley Harry <wesharry@tiscali.co.uk> wrote: Sounds like Glasgow
>Highlanders.
>Do you need a copy of the original instructions? If so mail me.
>Regards,
>Wesley
>
>----- Original Message -----
>From: "Victor Raymond"
>To:
>Sent: Monday, March 20, 2006 7:41 PM
>Subject: Question about dances
>
>
> > Dear All,
> >
> > I probably ought to ask Linda Lieberman this question, but I'll toss it
> > out here. Forgive me if I'm just incapable of finding dances on my own.
> >
> > I'm looking for dances that include the following figure (and I suspect
>it
> > is a small number):
> >
> > At *some* point in the dance, the first couple dances down, picking up
> > second lady as they go by: 2L-1M-1L. As they are dancing down, second
>man
> > follows behind first man. They all turn over their (right?) shoulders
>and
> > dance up the line of the dance, the two ladies stepping forward to be on
> > either side of second man, with first man now trailing. I don't recall
> > how the figure ends, as there might be several ways to finish.
> >
> > If anyone might point me towards dances with this figure, I would be
> > grateful. Thank you. (Suggestions on how to search for this stuff would
> > also be appreciated)
> >
> > Victor
> >
> >
> > Victor J Raymond
> > vraymond "at" iastate.edu
>
>
>
>
>---------------------------------
>Relax. Yahoo! Mail virus scanning helps detect nasty viruses!

Prague Dancing

Message 44874 · Ron Mackey · 25 Mar 2006 00:42:30 · Top

Hello, help please.
I friend of mine has a daughter who is heading for
Prague for a spell.
I would be pleased to receive information on the who, when
and where of SCD in Prague.
TIA

Prague Dancing

Message 44883 · Cord Walter · 26 Mar 2006 16:18:20 · Top

Ron Mackey schrieb:
> Hello, help please.
> I friend of mine has a daughter who is heading for
> Prague for a spell.
> I would be pleased to receive information on the who, when
> and where of SCD in Prague.

I attended a workshop / social in Prague in 1997 (?). If I remember
correctly, it was organised by the Dvorana Dance Group...
http://www.dvorana.cz/dance/index.html

Maybe this helps.

-cord
--
Cord Walter
email: cord.walter@gmx.de

"Ich liege in der Hängematte, also bin ich"
(Paul E. Pop)

Prague Dancing

Message 44884 · Martin Mulligan · 26 Mar 2006 19:49:10 · Top

Try the Caledonian Club of Prague:

http://caledonianclub.czweb.org/en/index.html

martin
(St John's, Newfoundland)

On 24-Mar-06, at 8:12 PM, Ron Mackey wrote:

>
> Hello, help please.
> I friend of mine has a daughter who is heading for
> Prague for a spell.
> I would be pleased to receive information on the who, when
> and where of SCD in Prague.
> TIA
>

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