strathspey Archive: Donald Where's Your Troosers

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Donald Where's Your Troosers

Message 3986 · Courtney Cartwright · 24 Apr 1996 22:02:11 · Top

Ian Brockbank Wrote:
>Hi all,
>
>At 01:45 pm 23/4/96 -0600, Huhg Goldie <goldie@duke.usask.ca> wrote:
>> ...
>>
>>I am looking for some fun songs (e.g. Donald Whar's Yer Troosers?) for
>>the Scottish Pavilion of our local "Folkfest". Any other sources would
>>be appreciated.
>
>>From memory:
>
>Ah've just come down from the Isle o' Skye,
>I'm not very big, an' I'm awf'y shy,
>an' the lassies shout when I go by
>"Hey Donald, whaur's yer troosers?"
>
>Refrain:
>Let the wind blow high, let the wind blow low,
>through the streets in ma kilt I go.
>All the lassies shout "Hello,
>hey Donald, whaur's yer troosers?"
>
>A lassie took me tae a ball
>and it was slippery in the hall
>and I was feared that I might fall
>for I hadnae on ma troosers.
>
>Refrain
>
>I once went down tae London town
>and I had some fun on the underground:
>a lady bent down tae pick up half a crown and said
We always sing: They ladies turned their heads around, saying
>[Best posh English accent here]
>"Donald, where are your trousers?"
>
>Refrain
>
>Oh the lassies want me in a' the lan' *
We always sing: The lassies want me, every one
>and let them catch me if they can.
>Ye cannae get the breeks off a hieland man,
>and I don't wear ma troosers.
>
>Refrain
>
>
Ian left out one of the best verses:

I had a cold and ma nose was raw
I hadnae handkercheif ava'
So I lifted up ma kilt just tae give it a blaw
WHEW, DONALD WHERE'S YER TROOSERS?

You cannae shove your granny off the bus (OFF THE BUS)
You cannae shove your granny off the bus (OFF THE BUS)
you cannae shove your granny, 'cause she's your mammy's mammy,
You cannae shove your granny off the bus.

You can shove your other granny off the bus (HEAVE HO)
You can shove your other granny off the bus (HEAVE HO)
You can shove your other granny, 'cause she's your daddy's mammy,
You can shove your other granny off the bus.

Singin' I will if you will, so will I
Singin' I will if you will, so will I
Singin' I will if you will, I will if you will,
I will if you will, so will I.

Sung to the tune of "She'll be comin' round the mountain"

--
Courtney Cartwright
Tucson, Arizona
ccartwri@primenet.com

Donald Where's Your Troosers

Message 3988 · Ian Brockbank, Digital Livingston · 25 Apr 1996 13:26:21 · Top

Hi again all,

Courtney Cartwright <ccartwri@primenet.com> writes (quoting me)

>Oh the lassies want me in a' the lan' *
We always sing: The lassies want me, every one
>and let them catch me if they can.
>Ye cannae get the breeks off a hieland man,
>and I don't wear ma troosers.

Of course! You can tell I learnt it by ear. Thanks for the extra verse,
Courtney. I'd never heard it before (though it was in the DigiTrad
archive). The DigiTrad version also reminded me of a verse I'd missed out -
Tae wear the kilt is my delight, etc.

So below is an agglomerated version based on my memory, Courtney's posting
and the DigiTrad archive version (which is written in English instead of
Scots and doesn't even fit the tune I know at times.)

1. I've just come down from the Isle of Skye,
I'm no very big an' I'm awfy shy,
And the lassies shout when I go by
"Hey Donald, whaur's yer troosers?"

Chorus:
Let the winds blow high, let the winds blow low
Through the streets in ma kilt I go.
All the lassies shout "Hello,
hey Donald, whaur's yer troosers?"

2. A lassie took me tae a ball
And it was slippery in the hall
And I was feared that I would fall
For I hadnae on ma troosers.

3. I once went down tae London town
And I had some fun on the Underground -
a lady bent down tae pick up half a crown and said *
"Donald, where are your trousers?" +

4. The lassies want me, every one
Just let them catch me if they can -
Ye cannae get the breeks off a Hieland man,
And I don't wear ma troosers.

5. I had a cold and ma nose was raw
I hadnae handkercheif at a'
So I lifted up ma kilt just tae give it a blaw
WHEW, DONALD, WHAUR'S YER TROOSERS?

6. Tae wear the kilt is my delight,
And it's not wrong, I know it's right.
How the folks back home would get a fright
If they saw me wearin' troosers

* Courtney knows this line as "The ladies turned there heads around, saying..."
+ The lady's words here should be sung in best posh English accent to
contrast with the Scots in the rest of the song.

Cheers,

Ian
--
\||/ Ian Brockbank, Edinburgh, Scotland - Ian.Brockbank@ecosse.edo.dec.com
o*__\ ------ I survived IVFDF '96! ------

Donald Where's Your Troosers

Message 3993 · Moray McConnachie · 25 Apr 1996 18:41:29 · Top

The reason there may be a little confusion is that the words COurtney cited
in his original posting are the words to some kind of medley with the
well-known Glasgow anthem "You canna shove your granny off a bus" mixed
in there somewhere to the tune She'll be coming round the mountain.
Incidentally, can anyone remember how that equally idiotic number about a
ballacher falling out of a tower-block balcony after his jammy piece
goes? And to what tune?
Yours,
Moray McConnachie

On Thu, 25 Apr 1996, Ian Brockbank, Digital>
> So below is an agglomerated version based on my memory, Courtney's posting
> and the DigiTrad archive version (which is written in English instead of
> Scots and doesn't even fit the tune I know at times.)
>

Donald Where's Your Troosers

Message 3994 · Alan Bell · 25 Apr 1996 19:19:07 · Top

Moray McConnachie wrote:
>
> The reason there may be a little confusion is that the words COurtney cited
> in his original posting are the words to some kind of medley with the
> well-known Glasgow anthem "You canna shove your granny off a bus" mixed
> in there somewhere to the tune She'll be coming round the mountain.
> Incidentally, can anyone remember how that equally idiotic number about a
> ballacher falling out of a tower-block balcony after his jammy piece
> goes? And to what tune?
> Yours,
> Moray McConnachie

I assume you mean "The Jeely Piece Song" by a banjo playing, moustached
scottish folk singer whose name escapes me at the moment.
It comes from the practice of mothers throwing sandwiches (pieces)
from tenement windows to their children playing below, something not
possible once the tenement blocks had been demolished in favour of high
rise flats.

Alan Bell

The Jeely Piece Song
---------------------

I am a syscraper wean
I live on the nuneteenth flaer
An' I'm no goin' oot tae play ony maer.
Since we've moved tae oor new hoose
I'm wastin' away
Cos I'm gettin' one less meal every day.

Chorus:
Oh, ye canna throw pieces oot a twenty story flat
seven thoosand hungry weans'll testify tae that
be it butter, cheese or jeely
be the breed plain or pan
the odds against it reachin earth are ninety nine tae wan.

On the first day, my ma threw a slice o' malted broon
It skited oot the windae an' went up instead o' doon
now evert twenty seven oors it comes intae sight
for my piece went intae orbit and became a satelite.

Chorus

On the next day my maw theought she'd try again
This time the piece collided with a fast low flying plane
The pilot scraped it from his goggles and shouted through the intercom
The Clideside Reds have got me wi' a breed an' Jeely bomb.

Chorus

On the third day my ma would have another go
The Salvation Army band was playin' doon below
'Onward Christian Soldiers' was the song they should have played
But the oom-pah man was playin on a piece an' marmalade

Chorus

Donald Where's Your Troosers

Message 3997 · Andrew J. Smith · 25 Apr 1996 23:07:24 · Top

I thought the appropriate line was "since we moved to Castlemilk, I'm
wasting away". Doubtless it was changed so as to accommodate those who
didn't know where or what Castlemilk is, though if you don't, the song
doesn't make much sense.

A reliable source is "The Scottish Folksinger" edited by Norman Buchan
and somebody else, though I'm sure it's long out of print. I'm not sure
who wrote "Skyscraper Wean" -- it has the feel of a Matt McGinn song.
Anyone know for sure?

*******************************************************************************
Message from:
Andrew J. M. Smith
mstajsx@gsusgi2.gsu.edu
*******************************************************************************

On Thu, 25 Apr 1996, Alan Bell wrote:

> Moray McConnachie wrote:
> >
> > The reason there may be a little confusion is that the words COurtney cited
> > in his original posting are the words to some kind of medley with the
> > well-known Glasgow anthem "You canna shove your granny off a bus" mixed
> > in there somewhere to the tune She'll be coming round the mountain.
> > Incidentally, can anyone remember how that equally idiotic number about a
> > ballacher falling out of a tower-block balcony after his jammy piece
> > goes? And to what tune?
> > Yours,
> > Moray McConnachie
>
> I assume you mean "The Jeely Piece Song" by a banjo playing, moustached
> scottish folk singer whose name escapes me at the moment.
> It comes from the practice of mothers throwing sandwiches (pieces)
> from tenement windows to their children playing below, something not
> possible once the tenement blocks had been demolished in favour of high
> rise flats.
>
> Alan Bell
>
>
> The Jeely Piece Song
> ---------------------
>
> I am a syscraper wean
> I live on the nuneteenth flaer
> An' I'm no goin' oot tae play ony maer.
> Since we've moved tae oor new hoose
> I'm wastin' away
> Cos I'm gettin' one less meal every day.
>
> Chorus:
> Oh, ye canna throw pieces oot a twenty story flat
> seven thoosand hungry weans'll testify tae that
> be it butter, cheese or jeely
> be the breed plain or pan
> the odds against it reachin earth are ninety nine tae wan.
>
>
> On the first day, my ma threw a slice o' malted broon
> It skited oot the windae an' went up instead o' doon
> now evert twenty seven oors it comes intae sight
> for my piece went intae orbit and became a satelite.
>
> Chorus
>
>
> On the next day my maw theought she'd try again
> This time the piece collided with a fast low flying plane
> The pilot scraped it from his goggles and shouted through the intercom
> The Clideside Reds have got me wi' a breed an' Jeely bomb.
>
> Chorus
>
> On the third day my ma would have another go
> The Salvation Army band was playin' doon below
> 'Onward Christian Soldiers' was the song they should have played
> But the oom-pah man was playin on a piece an' marmalade
>
> Chorus
>
> --
> Alan Bell <abell@oxmol.co.uk>
>

Donald Where's Your Troosers

Message 3999 · Anselm Lingnau · 26 Apr 1996 02:03:46 · Top

Andrew J. M. Smith <mstajsx@gsusgi2.Gsu.EDU> wrote:

> A reliable source is "The Scottish Folksinger" edited by Norman Buchan
> and somebody else, though I'm sure it's long out of print. I'm not sure
> who wrote "Skyscraper Wean" -- it has the feel of a Matt McGinn song.
> Anyone know for sure?

It's _The_Scottish_Folksinger_ -- 118 Modern & Traditional Folksongs,
edited by Norman Buchan and Peter Hall, Glasgow, London: Collins 1973
(new ed. 1986), ISBN 0-00-435698-5. The song in question is on page 23
under the name of `Skyscraper Wean'. The book says it's by Adam MacNaughtan
(again!). Here's the tune in ABC format, for those of you who are into
that kind of thing:

T:Skyscraper Wean
C:Adam MacNaughtan
K:G
M:4/4
GA|B2 BB B2 AB|cc cB A3 \
A|c2 c2 c2 Bc|d2 dc B3 \
d|ee ee gg fe|d2 dc B3 \
B|c2 BA c2 A2|c2 BA G2

Anselm

Donald Where's Your Troosers

Message 4001 · Gerry Gray · 26 Apr 1996 15:16:41 · Top

>
> I assume you mean "The Jeely Piece Song" by a banjo playing, moustached
> scottish folk singer whose name escapes me at the moment.
> It comes from the practice of mothers throwing sandwiches (pieces)
> from tenement windows to their children playing below, something not
> possible once the tenement blocks had been demolished in favour of high
> rise flats.
>
> Alan Bell
>

In the sixties I had the fortune of touring with Robin Hall and Jimmy
MacGregor. While I have no idea who wrote 'The Jeely Piece Song' I can
vouch for its popularity whenever they sang it. It was right up there
with 'Red Yo-Yo Wi a Wee Yella String'. It was a fun tour.

- Gerry

Donald Where's Your Troosers

Message 3995 · Anselm Lingnau · 25 Apr 1996 19:23:01 · Top

Moray McConnachie <cerberus@sable.ox.ac.uk> writes:

> Incidentally, can anyone remember how that equally idiotic number about a
> ballacher falling out of a tower-block balcony after his jammy piece
> goes? And to what tune?

The only song I know that involves a jammy piece (if I got the idiom
right) is the famous Jeely Piece Song, whose chorus goes something like

Ye canna fling a piece from a twentieth-story flat
Seven hundred hungry weans can testify to that
If it's butter, jam or jeely, if the breid is plain or pan,
The odds against it reaching Earth are ninety-nine tae wan.

(no guarantee about the numbers, or indeed anything).

This is printed, for example, in a book called _The_Scottish_Folksinger_,
which I had the good fortune to be able to pick up for the price of one
pound Sterling in a Princes Street discount book shop when I was living in
Edinburgh in 1989 or so. In that version of the song nobody actually fell
bodily from the balcony, although the jeely pieces sure got up to some
strange antics. -- Maybe you're confusing this with the famous comedy
song about the misfortunes of an Irish bricklayer :^)

Anselm
--
Anselm Lingnau ......................... lingnau@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de
I have made mistakes, but have never made the mistake of claiming I never made
one. --- James G. Bennet

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