strathspey Archive: muirland willie figure in strathspey time?

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muirland willie figure in strathspey time?

Message 39322 · Herbold.Bruce · 28 Sep 2004 19:10:03 · Top

Okay, my brain is turning to tapioca, I admit it. I read somewhere in
the last year or so a dance description that was very much like Muirland
Willie's meanwhile figure but in Strathspey tempo. Does anybody out
there know where I should look to find it again?

thanks,

Bruce Herbold
SF Branch

muirland willie figure in strathspey time?

Message 39323 · Carl Spain · 28 Sep 2004 19:19:22 · Top

Might you be thinking of Mrs Hamilton of Wishaw (Book 23/9, John Drewry)?

On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 10:07:26 -0700, herbold.bruce@epamail.epa.gov
<herbold.bruce@epamail.epa.gov> wrote:
> Okay, my brain is turning to tapioca, I admit it. I read somewhere in
> the last year or so a dance description that was very much like Muirland
> Willie's meanwhile figure but in Strathspey tempo. Does anybody out
> there know where I should look to find it again?
>
> thanks,
>
> Bruce Herbold
> SF Branch
>
>

muirland willie figure in strathspey time?

Message 39324 · Norma or Mike Briggs · 28 Sep 2004 19:20:56 · Top

Don't know the dance that Bruce is looking for, but I'll never forget
the very brief summary of Muirland Willie that one of our dancers came
up with some time ago:

1. All hell breaks loose.
2. Nothing much happens.

Mike
--
----------------------------------------------------
Norma Briggs Voice 608 835 0914
Michael J Briggs Fax 608 835 0924
BRIGGS LAW OFFICE
1519 Storytown Road Oregon WI 53575-2521 USA
----------------------------------------------------
www.briggslawoffice.com
----------------------------------------------------

muirland willie figure in strathspey time?

Message 39326 · Herbold.Bruce · 28 Sep 2004 19:39:44 · Top

Wow, I got two immediate responses suggesting Mrs Hamilton of Wishaw
(does everybody else's class always say "gesundheit" when they say that
dance name or is just my batch of smart-alecs?). But that is not the
dance I'm thnking of (or trying to think of) -- it was something in a
recently published, non-RSCDS book (I'm pretty sure).

[overuse of parentheses and dashes is probably another function of my
detriorating mental condition]

Bruce
{still SF Branch}

muirland willie figure in strathspey time?

Message 39335 · Ron Mackey · 29 Sep 2004 01:05:20 · Top

> Wow, I got two immediate responses suggesting Mrs Hamilton of Wishaw
> (does everybody else's class always say "gesundheit" when they say that
> dance name or is just my batch of smart-alecs?). But that is not the
> dance I'm thnking of (or trying to think of) -- it was something in a
> recently published, non-RSCDS book (I'm pretty sure).
>

Is my memory going too? I have the feeling that Ian Boyd used
the figure or variations thereof in some of his dances?? Are you there
Ian?

tourbillon- for those of us not paying attention.

Message 39345 · Nina Mussellam · 29 Sep 2004 05:42:25 · Top

Yes, I know that this figure/progression was discussed a while ago
and:::::::::
NO!! I did not pay attention...............:(((( hanging head

Therefore I am asking for clarification now as I see that it is in a dance
called "Spirit of the Dance" by Bob Blackie and is on the Oct social program
of the Van Isle group ( Vancouver Is, BC)
Is this correct???????
On Bar 1-2 , 1C and 2C turn their partners(2hands) and end with 1L in her
own place with her ptnr beside her in 2nd L's place AND 2C turn so that 2M
is in his own place with his ptnr on his left hand( in 1M place)

I picture this as 1M taking hands on bar 1 and but releasing his left hand
and leading his partner in a sweep onto the ladies side for bar 2.

on bar 3-4 , they set on the sides( holding partner's hand), but facing the
couple on the opp side.

on bar 5-6, they turn with 2 hands again on the sides of the set instead of
across the dance and therefore the 1L breaks the 2 hand turn and leads with
her partner to finish in 2M place and her partner finishes in 2L place.

2C has ended in 1st place on opp sides also?

bar 7-8 lead nicely into the casting off..................

Have I pictured this correctly?

Thanks - now to figure out the 3 couple Rights and Lefts or maybe it's best
to leave that until I've had some sleep(grin)
Nina Mussellam

tourbillon- for those of us not paying attention.

Message 39362 · mlamontbrown · 29 Sep 2004 21:27:20 · Top

Just in case you didn't get any private replies, your description seems
pretty accurate.

Malcolm

Malcolm & Helen Brown
York - UK

> -----Original Message-----
> From: Nina Mussellam [mailto:ninaquilts@shaw.ca]
> Sent: 29 September 2004 04:34
> To: strathspey@strathspey.org
> Subject: tourbillon- for those of us not paying attention.
>
> Yes, I know that this figure/progression was discussed a while ago
> and:::::::::
> NO!! I did not pay attention...............:(((( hanging head
>
> Therefore I am asking for clarification now as I see that it is in a dance
> called "Spirit of the Dance" by Bob Blackie and is on the Oct social
program
> of the Van Isle group ( Vancouver Is, BC)
> Is this correct???????
> On Bar 1-2 , 1C and 2C turn their partners(2hands) and end with 1L in her
> own place with her ptnr beside her in 2nd L's place AND 2C turn so that 2M
> is in his own place with his ptnr on his left hand( in 1M place)
>
> I picture this as 1M taking hands on bar 1 and but releasing his left hand
> and leading his partner in a sweep onto the ladies side for bar 2.
>
> on bar 3-4 , they set on the sides( holding partner's hand), but facing
the
> couple on the opp side.
>
> on bar 5-6, they turn with 2 hands again on the sides of the set instead
of
> across the dance and therefore the 1L breaks the 2 hand turn and leads
with
> her partner to finish in 2M place and her partner finishes in 2L place.
>
> 2C has ended in 1st place on opp sides also?
>
> bar 7-8 lead nicely into the casting off..................
>
> Have I pictured this correctly?
>
> Thanks - now to figure out the 3 couple Rights and Lefts or maybe it's
best
> to leave that until I've had some sleep(grin)
> Nina Mussellam

tourbillon- for those of us not paying attention.

Message 39424 · Chris1Ronald · 1 Oct 2004 17:02:04 · Top

Nina,
To your description, I would just add that on bar 1 first woman and second man dance strongly inwards on a diagonal as they take hands with their partner. In this way, they can help their partner around, and shorten the distance he or she needs to travel. And the same method applies on bar 5, when first man and second woman are the ones who dance diagonally inwards.

By the way, the tourbillon was devised by Barry Priddey, and is one of my favourite figures of progression.

Chris.

muirland willie figure in strathspey time?

Message 39488 · Priscilla M. Burrage · 8 Oct 2004 16:41:44 · Top

Quoting Norma or Mike Briggs <brigglaw@earthlink.net>:

> Don't know the dance that Bruce is looking for, but I'll never forget
> the very brief summary of Muirland Willie that one of our dancers came
> up with some time ago:
>
> 1. All hell breaks loose.
> 2. Nothing much happens.

Reminds me of the time Torf was aksed to brief glasgow Highlanders at the TAC
AGM. He said,"There are two down-ups. On the first down-up, you down-up; and
on the second, three dancers scurry around and the fourth wonders whether or
not he should be scurrying around. You know the rest."

La Bastringe

Message 39489 · Monica Bielke · 8 Oct 2004 17:10:58 · Top

Maybe I'm not spelling it right, but I've been web-searching for dance
instructions on this one and had no luck yet. Any suggestions?

Mine are packed in a box somewhere and I can't find them.

Monica
"Courage is the price that life exacts for granting peace." Amelia
Earhart

La Bastringe

Message 39490 · Marilyn Knight · 8 Oct 2004 17:17:26 · Top

It might be 'La Bastinge'(minus the 'r'???)

Marilynn Latta Knight
Membership
South Carolina Chamber of Commerce

-----Original Message-----
From: Monica Bielke [mailto:sequoia@the-dojo.com]
Sent: Friday, October 08, 2004 11:11 AM
To: strathspey@strathspey.org
Subject: La Bastringe

Maybe I'm not spelling it right, but I've been web-searching for dance
instructions on this one and had no luck yet. Any suggestions?

Mine are packed in a box somewhere and I can't find them.

Monica
"Courage is the price that life exacts for granting peace." Amelia
Earhart

La Bastringe

Message 39492 · Colleen Putt · 8 Oct 2004 17:23:18 · Top

It's La Bastringue, after a fiddle tune and song of the same name.
"Mademoiselle, voulez-vous dancez La Bastringue, La Bastringue? Mademoiselle,
voulez-vous dancez? La Bastringue est commencee."
Cheers,
Colleen

> It might be 'La Bastinge'(minus the 'r'???)
>
> Marilynn Latta Knight
> Membership
> South Carolina Chamber of Commerce
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Monica Bielke [mailto:sequoia@the-dojo.com]
> Sent: Friday, October 08, 2004 11:11 AM
> To: strathspey@strathspey.org
> Subject: La Bastringe
>
> Maybe I'm not spelling it right, but I've been web-searching for dance
> instructions on this one and had no luck yet. Any suggestions?
>
> Mine are packed in a box somewhere and I can't find them.
>
> Monica
> "Courage is the price that life exacts for granting peace." Amelia
> Earhart
>
>

La Bastringe

Message 39491 · adriana linden · 8 Oct 2004 17:21:34 · Top

Here's a website with instructions:
http://www.folkdance.com/html/la_bastringue.html

Cheers,
Adriana Linden
Montréal QC

--- Monica Bielke <sequoia@the-dojo.com> wrote:
> Maybe I'm not spelling it right, but I've been web-searching for dance
> instructions on this one and had no luck yet. Any suggestions?
>
> Mine are packed in a box somewhere and I can't find them.
>
> Monica
> "Courage is the price that life exacts for granting peace." Amelia
> Earhart
>
>

______________________________________________________________________
Post your free ad now! http://personals.yahoo.ca

La Bastringe

Message 39493 · Alasdair Graham · 8 Oct 2004 17:25:01 · Top

Try La Bastringue
as this brings up dance instructions in Google.

Alasdair Graham
Dumbarton, Scotland.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Monica Bielke" <sequoia@the-dojo.com>
To: <strathspey@strathspey.org>
Sent: Friday, October 08, 2004 4:11 PM
Subject: La Bastringe

> Maybe I'm not spelling it right, but I've been web-searching for dance
> instructions on this one and had no luck yet. Any suggestions?
>
> Mine are packed in a box somewhere and I can't find them.
>
> Monica
> "Courage is the price that life exacts for granting peace." Amelia
> Earhart
>
>

---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.774 / Virus Database: 521 - Release Date: 07/10/2004

La Bastringe

Message 39495 · SMiskoe · 8 Oct 2004 19:17:17 · Top

Great mixer, good song, good tune. The gist of the song is
Young lady will you dance with me?
Yes, I will.
Old man will you dance again?
No I will not.
Why?
Because my corns hurt.

Sylvia Miskoe, Concord NH USA

La Bastringe

Message 39497 · Richard Goss · 8 Oct 2004 22:43:30 · Top

Since this is an SCD site, I am assuming that your question is in this context. The "la" suggests that your "Bastringe" is one of the later figures (probably 4 or 5) of a quadrille. There are generic French names to the quadrille figures, but there are also specific names for the figures in specific quadrilles.

For example, many quadrilles, have the names of military units (Lancers being an example that is often confused as something different than a quadrille when in fact it is simply an example of one). Often in these cases, the tunes, while parallel to those in the generic figure names, are associated in some way with the military unit. Besides military units, quadrilles are named after places, operas, and other criteria. For example, the ACL label that produced a lot of early SCD music also published a quadrille called "Trial by Jury" in which all of the figures were danced to G&S tunes from that operetta. The same can be said of popular Italian opears and Spanish zarsuelas popular in the UK.

There is no record that some of these were even danced. For example some collections of Scottish dance music list quadrilles that are simply a collection of Scottish or Irish tunes, arranged in quadrille formation.

The RSCDS dance (figures out of order and not fitting the music) "Circassian Circle" is both a longways improper (ecossaise) generic dance, while the tune is from the first figure of a quadrille. Quadrille figures are actually separate dances, in this case 2x32 bars long with the head couples doing the dance, followed by the sides. NB: I mentioned the RSCDS problem as there are other versions that fit the music better. For example ours is 1. rights and lefts, 2. set 2x turn partner, 3. ladies chain, 4 pousette, making it an ABAB dance figuring that the A´s are skip change and the B´s are pdb. However the music is AABB, and the other, pre RSCDS versions are rights and lefts into ladies chain (all skip change), then set 2x, turn into pousette (all pdb). The transitions are smoother as the rights and lefts without the polite turn flows right into ladies chain. At the end of the chain, simply change hands and leave them joined for the set 2x, turn both hands, and pousette.

NB: Circassians were a Turkish military unit made up of kidnapped Christian children, usually from Yugolavia. They were not allowed to marry until they retired, so had no sense of loyalty to family or country of origin, and since they were well treated by the sultan, were highly reliable professional soldiers sent wherever in the Turkish empire. On retirement, they often were given highly rewarded positions in the civil service, or given land when they got married. They are muslims and still around, often as guards for the various Arab royal families. They look like Europeans and dress like cossacks.

La Bastringe

Message 39498 · Martin · 8 Oct 2004 23:28:33 · Top

LE bastringue (French noun): low-class dance hall.

Also the name of a trad dance from French speaking Canada.

Origin obscure.

Martin,
in Grenoble, France.

http://perso.wanadoo.fr/scots.in.france/scd.htm

La Bastringe

Message 39500 · SallenNic · 9 Oct 2004 03:05:53 · Top

In a message dated 8/10/04 10:29:41 pm, mj.sheffield@wanadoo.fr writes:

> LE bastringue (French noun): low-class dance hall.
>
> Also the name of a trad dance from French speaking Canada.
>
> Origin obscure.
>
> Martin,
> in Grenoble, France.
>

Dance from Quebec (?) always known as LA Bastringue - odd :-)

Nicolas B., Lanark, Scotland http://www.nicolasbroadbridge.com

La Bastringe

Message 39502 · Martin · 9 Oct 2004 11:55:03 · Top

Hi, Nicolas,
you wrote:

>Dance from Quebec (?) always known as LA Bastringue - odd :-)

That's what I thought, but my dictionaries say LE, much to my surprise.

Quebec-France: two nations divided by a common language?

Can anyone think of a way of tying this thread to SCD?

Martin

La Bastringe

Message 39505 · Richard Goss · 9 Oct 2004 16:15:21 · Top

Two people already did (myself and one other). La Bastringe is the specific name of a figure*, probably number 4 or 5, in a quadrille.
-----
Quadrilles usually had 5 or six figures, each of which would be equivalent to a country dance in length. The progression if 2x32 bars would be head couples then side couples as in Circassian Circle which comes from the first quadrille figure, or 4x32 (or 40) as in the central part of our "Eightsome Reel".

I just found two examples in the unpacked part of my music library.
<<The Scottish Dance Album>> published by Paterson, n.d. (but price is 1/6 puts it in the range of the original SCD books - I could probably figure it out based on the adverts on the back and the addresses in London, Edinburgh, New York, Toronto, and Wellington). It is 28 pages long, contains music (no dance notes) for the following::
8 country dances published by the Society.
4 Highland dances using music still current in competitions.
3 Highland Schottisches using music also published by the Society
Eightsome Reel, and two quadrilles:
.....
Bonnie Dundee Quadrilles (reel time)
1. Bonnie Dundee & Whistle and I´ll Come tae you.
2. White Cockade & Torryburn Lassies
3. Hundred Pipers (jig)
4. Clean Pease Strae & Boatie Rows
5. Soldier´s Joy & My Love She´s but a Lassie Yet
6. Corn Rigs & Piper o´Dundee & Kate Dalrymple
Coda: Auld Lang Syne

St Patrick Quadrille (jig time)
1. St Patrick´s Day & Donnybrook Boy
2. Tenpenny Bit & Rory o´More
3. Garry Owen & Father o´Flynn
4. Young May Moon & Biddy of Sligo
5. Irish Washerwoman & Gentle Maiden
6. Humours of Donnybrook & Love´s Young Dream & Rakes of Mallow

Typically quadrille figures are 2 or 4 repeats. Most quadrilles are made up of related tunes and not medleys as this example. In the case of "La Bastringe" the other 4 or 5 tunes would be related in some way. Another difference is that the different figures use different types of tunes, reel, jig, scottische (strathspey?), polka, waltz.

The connection with SCD is that many of the quadrills using the same figures as those published by the Society survive in Scotland, and some have kept their French generic or specific names. In the case of my example, I think the book is just a pop collection of dance tunes assembled in such a way as to make the publication sell. Another connection with the early Society is that we used the same publisher as the adverts on the back (J. Michael Diack). He lists 3:
<<Seventeen Scottish Songs: very simply arranged for very young pianists>>, which contains at least 9 tunes to which I know 4 dances-
<<Nine Scottish Songs: very simple>>, containing 6 to which I know dances.
<<My Ain Countree: a few Scottish lilts strung together, moderately difficult>> containing 9 to which I know 5 dances.
NB: There are some other tunes included above that have been used by Drewry for dances that I could not do without a cue.


La Bastringe

Message 39506 · Norma or Mike Briggs · 9 Oct 2004 17:07:15 · Top

Don't know what the connection is, if any, between La Bastringue and the
quadrilles. La B is a big circle dance. TMK, quadrilles are square
dances. Maybe Richard would elucidate.

The SCD connection, at least locally: The Silk and Thistle Dancers, a
class of the Chicago branch, each year dance La Bastringue as an
intermission dance at Frolic on the Fox, their informal ball.

I know a couple dance musicians who refer to the tune as La Bastrange.
To bring this back to Scotland, there is a well-known march whose title
I've heard perverted to The Boring Rocks of Aden.

Any other jokey names for tunes or dances out there?

Mike
--
----------------------------------------------------
Norma Briggs Voice 608 835 0914
Michael J Briggs Fax 608 835 0924
BRIGGS LAW OFFICE
1519 Storytown Road Oregon WI 53575-2521 USA
----------------------------------------------------
www.briggslawoffice.com
----------------------------------------------------

La Bastringe

Message 39507 · Mike Mudrey · 9 Oct 2004 17:27:43 · Top

>La Bastringue and the quadrilles.

To add confusion, LaBastringue is normally danced as the last figure in the
Quadrille de ste basil in quebec.

The Quadrille is typically two or three couples facing two or three
couples. (figures are similar to the Claire Plain Set or the Allegemeine
Francaise).. In the last figure, all dancers join into a larger set for the
finale.

Does this help, Mike?

I can bring the directions for the Quadrille to the Madison Scottish County
Dancers weekly dance held on the Campus of the University of Wisconsin
every Sunday evening (notice the plug!!).

Another Mike from Madison!

La Bastringe

Message 39508 · Richard Goss · 9 Oct 2004 17:33:07 · Top

Many of the early quadrilles expanded into cotillions that were danced by the entire room in a circle. Just as 8-some expanded into 16-some (horrible dance), 32-some (lots of fun, and fond memories with Bill Ireland at the dems the summer school used to do at Pitlochery. Then of course there is the book <<The General Danced at Dawn>> that has a 128-some (mind boggling).

Regarding my previous post, I just thought of another way of dating the book edited by Diack. In looking at his his items, there is only one that seems a bet contemporary as compared to the others. This is, as you mentioned, "The Barren Rocks of Aden". I first became aware of this tune at ceilidh dancing as one of those for the "Gay Gordons". I think the connection with the Gordon Highlanders, is that it was written to commemorate their posting in what is now Yemen, on the Gulf of Aden. So if anyone knew the time of their stay there, or the date of that tune we would then have a date, after which this book would have to have been published. Because of the price and dances, I would say before 1930, at which time Diack was editing Society publications, and the country dance tunes he includes were all published by the Society before that time.

Barren Rocks of Aden [was: Re: La Bastringe]

Message 39513 · John Cahill · 9 Oct 2004 20:12:30 · Top

At 08:33 AM 10/9/2004, Richard Goss wrote:

>Regarding my previous post, I just thought of another way of dating the
>book edited by Diack. In looking at his his items, there is only one that
>seems a bet contemporary as compared to the others. This is, as you
>mentioned, "The Barren Rocks of Aden". I first became aware of this tune
>at ceilidh dancing as one of those for the "Gay Gordons". I think the
>connection with the Gordon Highlanders, is that it was written to
>commemorate their posting in what is now Yemen, on the Gulf of Aden. So if
>anyone knew the time of their stay there, or the date of that tune we
>would then have a date, after which this book would have to have been
>published. Because of the price and dances, I would say before 1930, at
>which time Diack was editing Society publications, and the country dance
>tunes he includes were all published by the Society before that time.

As happens to a lot of pipe tunes "Barren Rocks of Aden" is often
attributed to
"Traditional" but it seems to be one of James Mauchline's
(1817-1896). Roderick
Cannon discusses the tune several times in "The Highland Bagpipe and Its Music"
and mentions that Mauchline claimed to have written it "as early as
1843". If he did,
quoth Cannon, "he was breaking new ground in pipe music, and he may have been
aware of the fact." Vide pg. 43.

Cheers,

-John-

Barren Rocks of Aden [was: Re: La Bastringe]

Message 39516 · Richard Goss · 9 Oct 2004 20:53:55 · Top

I agree that the word "trad" attached to tune or dance is often just lazyness on the part of the publisher or editor. For example, most American and British Christmas Carols have known authors, or at least a tune name that refers to the book from which it was taken as CofS and CofE hardback hymnals.

I am afraid that I don´t know much about regimental history, beyond the fact that the Gordons were one and were stationed in Aden. My knowledge of British colonies and protectorates, gets confused when it comes to the Middle East. I do seem to remember that, if we look at the bottom part of the Arabian peninsula, that there were protectected sultanates of Muscat and Oman, and there was a different arrangment involving UK regiments up until at least the 1950´s in what is now called Yemen. So, if your writer was a member of a Scottish regiment he could have written it while he was there, or if not, it could have been written back in the UK, when some of the regiment returned and described the place.

I have a library problem. My house, pre Columbus is only partially renovated. I had planning permission to finish the job based on plans filed in May. They were supposed to start this autumn. Unfortunately the town dicided to bury the power lines and dug a trench 5 feet deep, so people on my side have little draw bridges to get out their front doors. To make matters worse, I started poking around in the trench one night and found some medieval pottery which I dutifly left in place and reported this to the town hall. All work stopped, permits were put on hold. and the right wing half of my neighbors are unhappy about the dust (the greens support my actions though). As of now, since there is no money for proper digging, the archaeologists from the capital poked around, then recommended that the work start again except they get to watch and then when the hole is filled in some special stuff will be included to protect what´s left and the paving will be less than permanent. So we are
waiting for this report to get back to the town hall so projects can restart. This means that my library of over 5,000 books is still pretty much in boxes. The library shelving company has already finished their part, but can´t install without the room being finished, wired and plumbed, and every book I want seems to be inaccessable.

Needless to say, I did find something you might find of interest. Adan, called the Gibraltar of the East, became of interest to the UK when Napoleon conquered Egypt and threatened access to India. In 1799 the British occupied a rocky island of Perim, but this was so inhospitable that in 1802 they got access to Aden from its Sultan making a part of the Indian province of Bombey. With steam navigation in the Red Sea a larger portion was captured from the Sultan in 1839, and in 1868 and 1888 the accession was legalized by purchase, though still under the Viceroy of India. Crown coloney in 1937, and 1962 a protectorate promising independence in 1968. Independance as part of the People´s Republic of South Yemen in 1967, and Aden as capital in 1968.

In other words, the Gordons could have been there and found it barren any time between 1799 and 1967 when British presence was ended. This still makes the tune younger than the others in my book, and, since the Gordons probably had a batallion overseas during most of this time, your composer was alive, we are no closer to solving my pre 1930s for the book problem. A lot of British military music came out of the Napoleonic period but this tune has more of a Victorian feel to it, so I would go for about the 1840 to 1888 period that fits your composer.

Barren Rocks of Aden

Message 39522 · Ron Mackey · 10 Oct 2004 02:04:34 · Top

> In other words, the Gordons could have been there and found it barren any time between 1799 and 1967 when British presence was ended. This still makes the tune younger than the others in my book, and, since the Gordons probably had a batallion overseas during most of this time, your composer was alive, we are no closer to solving my pre 1930s for the book problem. A lot of British military music came out of the Napoleonic period but this tune has more of a Victorian feel to it, so I would go for about the 1840
to 1888 period that fits your composer.
>


Do The Gordon Highlanders not have a website. Or does one have to
go to a War Office w/s to get at the regimental histories. Or perhaps
The Imperial War Museum can help?

Barren Rocks of Aden

Message 39530 · Jean Martin · 10 Oct 2004 12:05:50 · Top

Dear Ron
There is a very good Gordon Highlanders Museum in Aberdeen. Its website is
www.gordonhighlanders.com
There is a secretary on duty every day but the actual museum is staffed by
ex Gorodn Highlanders who are usually very knowledgeable about the history
of the regiment and keen to help.
Jean Martin
----- Original Message -----
From: "Ron Mackey" <Ron.Mackey@btinternet.com>
To: <strathspey@strathspey.org>
Sent: Sunday, October 10, 2004 1:04 AM
Subject: Re: Barren Rocks of Aden

> > In other words, the Gordons could have been there and found it barren
any time between 1799 and 1967 when British presence was ended. This still
makes the tune younger than the others in my book, and, since the Gordons
probably had a batallion overseas during most of this time, your composer
was alive, we are no closer to solving my pre 1930s for the book problem. A
lot of British military music came out of the Napoleonic period but this
tune has more of a Victorian feel to it, so I would go for about the 1840
> to 1888 period that fits your composer.
> >
>
>
> Do The Gordon Highlanders not have a website. Or does one have to
> go to a War Office w/s to get at the regimental histories. Or perhaps
> The Imperial War Museum can help?

La Bastringe

Message 39509 · adriana linden · 9 Oct 2004 18:15:55 · Top

I've heard tell that in the US South, the tune we know as "La Tempete" has
morphed into "Tom Pete" in some circles...

Adriana Linden
Montreal QC

--- Norma or Mike Briggs <brigglaw@earthlink.net> wrote:
> Don't know what the connection is, if any, between La Bastringue and the
> quadrilles. La B is a big circle dance. TMK, quadrilles are square
> dances. Maybe Richard would elucidate.
>
> The SCD connection, at least locally: The Silk and Thistle Dancers, a
> class of the Chicago branch, each year dance La Bastringue as an
> intermission dance at Frolic on the Fox, their informal ball.
>
> I know a couple dance musicians who refer to the tune as La Bastrange.
> To bring this back to Scotland, there is a well-known march whose title
> I've heard perverted to The Boring Rocks of Aden.
>
> Any other jokey names for tunes or dances out there?
>
> Mike
> --
> ----------------------------------------------------
> Norma Briggs Voice 608 835 0914
> Michael J Briggs Fax 608 835 0924
> BRIGGS LAW OFFICE
> 1519 Storytown Road Oregon WI 53575-2521 USA
> ----------------------------------------------------
> www.briggslawoffice.com
> ----------------------------------------------------
>
>

______________________________________________________________________
Post your free ad now! http://personals.yahoo.ca

La Bastringe

Message 39511 · Richard Goss · 9 Oct 2004 19:46:18 · Top

At Cecil Sharp house, I heard that it was known at Berea (Kentucky), as the Kentucky Tempest. Yes, historicly some quadrilles were "flattened" into what are called by some as "union" dances, sort of a double Circassian Circle, with two couples facing two couples, but the figures that would be done in a quadrille at right angles to each other can, and were, done at a 45º angle, as in four hands across, and back, repeat others.

La Bastringe

Message 39518 · Brian Charlton · 10 Oct 2004 00:23:22 · Top

G'Day, All,

Martin asks if anyone can tie this thread to SCD.

John Taylor and Andrew Imbrie play La Bastringue on their Album "Steppin'
Out" and describe the dance in the cover notes.

Brian Charlton,
Sydney, Australia

-----Original Message-----
From: Martin [mailto:mj.sheffield@wanadoo.fr]
Sent: Saturday, 9 October 2004 5:11 PM
To: strathspey@strathspey.org
Subject: Re: La Bastringe

Hi, Nicolas,
you wrote:

>Dance from Quebec (?) always known as LA Bastringue - odd :-)

That's what I thought, but my dictionaries say LE, much to my surprise.

Quebec-France: two nations divided by a common language?

Can anyone think of a way of tying this thread to SCD?

Martin

La Bastringe

Message 39520 · Monica Bielke · 10 Oct 2004 00:38:16 · Top

Brian Charlton
> Martin asks if anyone can tie this thread to SCD.
> John Taylor and Andrew Imbrie play La Bastringue on their Album
"Steppin' Out" and describe the dance in the cover notes.

Which is the way I first heard of it, so it never occurred to me it
would be "Off-topic"(TM).
Unfortunately, the album is hiding in my box-filled garage, so I asked
you-all. It's nice to be on the Strathspey list again after so long.

Monica
"We are continually faced by great opportunities, brilliantly disguised
as insoluble problems."
anonymous

La Bastringe

Message 39531 · SallenNic · 10 Oct 2004 12:19:31 · Top

In a message dated 9/10/04 5:16:24 pm, adrianalinden@yahoo.com writes:

> I've heard tell that in the US South, the tune we know as "La Tempete" has
> morphed into "Tom Pete" in some circles... 
>
> Adriana Linden
> Montreal QC
>

"Tom Pate" was published in Seven Midland Dances by Sybil Clark in 1955. She
was given it by Miss Edith Palmer of Warkton, Northants., who said it had been
included in every village dance and social for at least the previous forty
years.

Nicolas B., Lanark, Scotland http://www.nicolasbroadbridge.com

A Dance - or tune - by any other name. . . .

Message 39514 · John Cahill · 9 Oct 2004 20:20:36 · Top

At 08:06 AM 10/9/2004, Mike wrote:

>I know a couple dance musicians who refer to the tune as La Bastrange. To
>bring this back to Scotland, there is a well-known march whose title I've
>heard perverted to The Boring Rocks of Aden.
>
>Any other jokey names for tunes or dances out there?

I have a friend who missed a band practice at which new tunes
were put on the table. He called me to find out what they were
so he could get a head start. He couldn't find one of them in
any of his books or any index. Whether the cause was his
hearing, the telephone line, or my elocution I don't know, but
ever since "Siege of Delhi" has been called "Seafood Deli"
after the non-existent tune he searched for so unsuccessfully.

Our SCD class tried valiantly - and eventually successfully -
to learn a fiendishly difficult dance named after some sort of
boat. A Drewry dance, I think, but I don't actually remember.
In fact, at this point I can't even recall the real name of the
dance because it forever after became "Das Boot" after the
gruelling U boat movie of the same name. (Is there a "St.
John's Boat"? Could that be the name? Memory's the first
thing to go they say. . .)

Cheers,

-John-

A Dance - or tune - by any other name. . . .

Message 39515 · Russell Ham · 9 Oct 2004 20:37:58 · Top

Sounds like you're thinking of St. Nicholas' Boat. It _does_
have its moments--and that's about all I can recall of it!

RBH

John Cahill wrote:

> Our SCD class tried valiantly - and eventually successfully -
> to learn a fiendishly difficult dance named after some sort of
> boat. A Drewry dance, I think, but I don't actually remember.
> In fact, at this point I can't even recall the real name of the
> dance because it forever after became "Das Boot" after the
> gruelling U boat movie of the same name. (Is there a "St.
> John's Boat"? Could that be the name? Memory's the first
> thing to go they say. . .)
>
> Cheers,
>
> -John-
>
>

A Dance - or tune - by any other name. . . .

Message 39519 · Monica Bielke · 10 Oct 2004 00:29:48 · Top

The St. Nicholas Boat. I think so too. One of my favorite Drewry
dances, with what we call "choo-choo-train" reels in it (since we're
talking about altered dance terms and tunes :-).

In our early days of SCD classes, a friend and I used to say "wild
abdomen" intead of controlled abandon.

Thanks for all the help with La Bastringue, everyone. My class will
thank you too, I hope. :-)
Monica
Boise, Idaho

> Sounds like you're thinking of St. Nicholas' Boat. It _does_
> have its moments--and that's about all I can recall of it!
> RBH
>
>
> John Cahill wrote:
> > Our SCD class tried valiantly - and eventually successfully -
> > to learn a fiendishly difficult dance named after some sort of
> > boat. A Drewry dance, I think, but I don't actually remember.
> > In fact, at this point I can't even recall the real name of the
> > dance because it forever after became "Das Boot" after the
> > gruelling U boat movie of the same name. (Is there a "St.
> > John's Boat"? Could that be the name? Memory's the first
> > thing to go they say. . .)
>

A Dance - or tune - by any other name. . . .

Message 39542 · John Cahill · 11 Oct 2004 00:19:29 · Top

That's it!

Cheers,

-John-

At 11:42 AM 10/9/2004, you wrote:
>Sounds like you're thinking of St. Nicholas' Boat. It _does_
>have its moments--and that's about all I can recall of it!
>
>RBH

A Dance - or tune - by any other name. . . .

Message 39543 · Norma or Mike Briggs · 11 Oct 2004 01:13:23 · Top

Once upon a time, there were two brothers in a remote part of Scotland,
farming adjacent farms. Their name was MacHine.

The first brother's land was rich and productive. He made a lot of
money. He had a fine team of horses to pull his plow.

The second brother's farm was nothing but rocks and thin sandy soil. He
made very little money. He had to pull his plow himself, because he was
. . .

The MacHine without horses.
--
----------------------------------------------------
Norma Briggs Voice 608 835 0914
Michael J Briggs Fax 608 835 0924
BRIGGS LAW OFFICE
1519 Storytown Road Oregon WI 53575-2521 USA
----------------------------------------------------
www.briggslawoffice.com
----------------------------------------------------

A Dance - or tune - by any other name. . . .

Message 39525 · John Chambers · 10 Oct 2004 03:39:39 · Top

At 08:06 AM 10/9/2004, Mike wrote:

>I know a couple dance musicians who refer to the tune as La Bastrange. To
>bring this back to Scotland, there is a well-known march whose title I've
>heard perverted to The Boring Rocks of Aden.
>
>Any other jokey names for tunes or dances out there?

A few years ago, the following parody of tune names popped
up on a number of mailing lists. Think "heavy Brit accent",
or try playing it to catch the joke. (Any SCD musician will
know this tune.)

X:807
T:My Son's A Prawn
C:anon.
R:Reel
F:http://abc.musicaviva.com/tunes/anon/my-sons-a-prawn/my-sons-a-prawn-1.abc
%Posted 26 Apr 1999 at ABC-users by Richard Robinson as a joke.
M:4/4
L:1/4
K:A
P:A
e/d/|
"A"cA A/B/A/F/|"A"E/F/A/B/ d/c/B/A/|\
"Bm"dB B/c/B/A/|"E7"B/c/d/e/ g/f/e/d/|\
"A"cA A/B/A/F/|"A"E/F/A/B/ d/c/B/A/|\
"D"B/c/d/e/ f/e/f/a/|"E7"e/d/c/B/ "A"A:|

A Dance - or tune - by any other name. . . .

Message 39534 · lizandbernie.hewitt · 10 Oct 2004 21:28:46 · Top

It's not often that I don't get a joke - but this one had me perplexed for
ages. Having coverted the text to a .abc file, printed out the music, then
tried to work out how the words "My Sons's a Prawn fitted to it" it was only
after I'd played it through 4 or 5 times did the awful truth dawn - and it
is awful - the joke that is.

Got any more? (In fact, if you have, hang on to them please.)

Bernie Hewitt
lizandbernie.hewitt@btopenworld.com
+44 (0)131 339 1677

----- Original Message -----

From: "John Chambers" <jc@trillian.mit.edu>
To: <strathspey@strathspey.org>; <strathspey@strathspey.org>
Sent: Sunday, October 10, 2004 2:47 AM
Subject: Re: A Dance - or tune - by any other name. . . .

> At 08:06 AM 10/9/2004, Mike wrote:
>
> >I know a couple dance musicians who refer to the tune as La Bastrange. To
> >bring this back to Scotland, there is a well-known march whose title I've
> >heard perverted to The Boring Rocks of Aden.
> >
> >Any other jokey names for tunes or dances out there?
>
> A few years ago, the following parody of tune names popped
> up on a number of mailing lists. Think "heavy Brit accent",
> or try playing it to catch the joke. (Any SCD musician will
> know this tune.)
>
> X:807
> T:My Son's A Prawn
> C:anon.
> R:Reel
>
F:http://abc.musicaviva.com/tunes/anon/my-sons-a-prawn/my-sons-a-prawn-1.abc
> %Posted 26 Apr 1999 at ABC-users by Richard Robinson as a joke.
> M:4/4
> L:1/4
> K:A
> P:A
> e/d/|
> "A"cA A/B/A/F/|"A"E/F/A/B/ d/c/B/A/|\
> "Bm"dB B/c/B/A/|"E7"B/c/d/e/ g/f/e/d/|\
> "A"cA A/B/A/F/|"A"E/F/A/B/ d/c/B/A/|\
> "D"B/c/d/e/ f/e/f/a/|"E7"e/d/c/B/ "A"A:|
>
>

A Dance - or tune - by any other name. . . .

Message 39535 · Iain Boyd · 10 Oct 2004 22:29:43 · Top

Dear John,

For the benefit of those of us who can not read music
(in any form) let alone play a musical instrument -
would you please explain.

Iain Boyd

> A few years ago, the following parody of tune names
> popped
> up on a number of mailing lists. Think "heavy Brit
> accent",
> or try playing it to catch the joke. (Any SCD
> musician will
> know this tune.)
>
> X:807
> T:My Son's A Prawn
> C:anon.
> R:Reel
>
F:http://abc.musicaviva.com/tunes/anon/my-sons-a-prawn/my-sons-a-prawn-1.abc
> %Posted 26 Apr 1999 at ABC-users by Richard Robinson
> as a joke.
> M:4/4
> L:1/4
> K:A
> P:A
> e/d/|
> "A"cA A/B/A/F/|"A"E/F/A/B/ d/c/B/A/|\
> "Bm"dB B/c/B/A/|"E7"B/c/d/e/ g/f/e/d/|\
> "A"cA A/B/A/F/|"A"E/F/A/B/ d/c/B/A/|\
> "D"B/c/d/e/ f/e/f/a/|"E7"e/d/c/B/ "A"A:|
>
>

=====
Postal Address -

P O Box 11-404
Wellington
New Zealand

Find local movie times and trailers on Yahoo! Movies.
http://au.movies.yahoo.com

A Dance - or tune - by any other name. . . .

Message 39540 · John Chambers · 10 Oct 2004 23:40:35 · Top

That's gotta be about the worst rewording of a title that I've heard.
I can't think of anything that even comes close.

Well, there was one shaggy-dog story that I heard at a dance camp
some years ago. They had just finished teaching The Duke of Perth,
and this fellow started telling the story of its origin. It seems
that it was created back in the days of the anti-whisky laws. The
dance crowd was used to the tradition wild, drunken parties with
people staggering through the steps, getting sick on the side, and so
on. To make the story much shorter than it was, they decided that the
only thing to do was to create a new dance commemmorating the sorry
state of affairs. And they named the dance after their newly-sober
state, The Dearth of Puke.

The original was told in a properly academic tone of voice, and got
the intended loud groan at the end.

There's gotta be a few more equally bad ...

| It's not often that I don't get a joke - but this one had me perplexed for
| ages. Having coverted the text to a .abc file, printed out the music, then
| tried to work out how the words "My Sons's a Prawn fitted to it" it was only
| after I'd played it through 4 or 5 times did the awful truth dawn - and it
| is awful - the joke that is.
|
| Got any more? (In fact, if you have, hang on to them please.)
|
| Bernie Hewitt
| lizandbernie.hewitt@btopenworld.com
| +44 (0)131 339 1677
|
| ----- Original Message -----
|
| From: "John Chambers" <jc@trillian.mit.edu>
| To: <strathspey@strathspey.org>; <strathspey@strathspey.org>
| Sent: Sunday, October 10, 2004 2:47 AM
| Subject: Re: A Dance - or tune - by any other name. . . .
|
|
| > At 08:06 AM 10/9/2004, Mike wrote:
| >
| > >I know a couple dance musicians who refer to the tune as La Bastrange. To
| > >bring this back to Scotland, there is a well-known march whose title I've
| > >heard perverted to The Boring Rocks of Aden.
| > >
| > >Any other jokey names for tunes or dances out there?
| >
| > A few years ago, the following parody of tune names popped
| > up on a number of mailing lists. Think "heavy Brit accent",
| > or try playing it to catch the joke. (Any SCD musician will
| > know this tune.)
| >
| > X:807
| > T:My Son's A Prawn
| > C:anon.
| > R:Reel
| >
| F:http://abc.musicaviva.com/tunes/anon/my-sons-a-prawn/my-sons-a-prawn-1.abc
| > %Posted 26 Apr 1999 at ABC-users by Richard Robinson as a joke.
| > M:4/4
| > L:1/4
| > K:A
| > P:A
| > e/d/|
| > "A"cA A/B/A/F/|"A"E/F/A/B/ d/c/B/A/|\
| > "Bm"dB B/c/B/A/|"E7"B/c/d/e/ g/f/e/d/|\
| > "A"cA A/B/A/F/|"A"E/F/A/B/ d/c/B/A/|\
| > "D"B/c/d/e/ f/e/f/a/|"E7"e/d/c/B/ "A"A:|
| >
| >
|
|
|

A Dance - or tune - by any other name. . . .

Message 39541 · John Chambers · 10 Oct 2004 23:45:08 · Top

| Dear John,
|
| For the benefit of those of us who can not read music
| (in any form) let alone play a musical instrument -
| would you please explain.
|
| Iain Boyd

Do I have to? Oh, well; I suppose the musicians here have
all figured it out by now and done all the groaning they're
likely to do. The tune is Mason's Apron.

| > A few years ago, the following parody of tune names
| > popped
| > up on a number of mailing lists. Think "heavy Brit
| > accent",
| > or try playing it to catch the joke. (Any SCD
| > musician will
| > know this tune.)
| >
| > X:807
| > T:My Son's A Prawn
| > C:anon.
| > R:Reel
| >
| F:http://abc.musicaviva.com/tunes/anon/my-sons-a-prawn/my-sons-a-prawn-1.abc
| > %Posted 26 Apr 1999 at ABC-users by Richard Robinson
| > as a joke.
| > M:4/4
| > L:1/4
| > K:A
| > P:A
| > e/d/|
| > "A"cA A/B/A/F/|"A"E/F/A/B/ d/c/B/A/|\
| > "Bm"dB B/c/B/A/|"E7"B/c/d/e/ g/f/e/d/|\
| > "A"cA A/B/A/F/|"A"E/F/A/B/ d/c/B/A/|\
| > "D"B/c/d/e/ f/e/f/a/|"E7"e/d/c/B/ "A"A:|
| >
| >
|
| =====
| Postal Address -
|
| P O Box 11-404
| Wellington
| New Zealand
|
| Find local movie times and trailers on Yahoo! Movies.
| http://au.movies.yahoo.com
|

A week in the sun

Message 39494 · Priscilla M. Burrage · 8 Oct 2004 17:30:41 · Top

Well, I've read a guidebook on Puerto Rico that included a chapter on Vieques.
It said that most people go there because of the 22 white sand beaches. Great
if we were about forty yeears younger and didn't run scared of skin cancer.
(You know Peter sees the skin doc once a year now as he hasn't had a serious
spot for over ten years. And even went a whole year without needing to have a
rough spot removed.) We had been to Puerto Rico itself about five years ago
after a the second English week on St. Croix. It's not a comfortable island to
visit as you don't know whether you're visiting a potential US state, an
independent Hispanic country, or a US possession convinced it isn't getting
enough of a handout.

Then I looked up flying to Puerto Rico vs. flying to the Virgin Islands. It's
the same price even though the Virgin Islands flight stops at San Juan,
PR!!!(!)
And if we stopped off at Puerto Rico, we'd have to pay for the next little leg
of the journey which upsets my Scottish genes. . .

Guess we are in favor of St. John, having said that, Maho Bay on St. John is our
first choie, as the Concordia complex is in an inconvenient spot for travel or
eating out or buying fresh food to eat in.

OK, so we're for the Harmony apartments above the Maho tents. Can enjoy the
Maho activities; get to Trunk Bay in about ten minutes for the NP snorkel
trail; drive to Cruz Bay for supper out or grocery shopping, a visit with
Louisa and Paco, who live there, etc. Maho is also close to the Annaberg sugar
plantation ruins (fixed up by the National Park guys).

Peter would rent a car with his discount. A jeep is recommended, but he would
probably go for four-wheel plus a bit of non-dust comfort.

The rest of this email shows that I earned my living planning the logistics of
change.

How do we get there? Well, to fly from either Madison or Burlington takes one
grueling day or a stayover on St. Thomas. As we would not be able to plan on
meeting part way through the trip, the safest approach is to get to St. Thomas
and stay overnight at a cheap hotel, rare, but available. (Best Western Carib,
one bay east of the airport, $100/night. Most of the others are above $200.)
We could then meet at breakfast the next morning.

The drive from the airport in the SW part of ST. Thomas to Red Hook on NW corner
goes over the top of the mountain with great views. On the way, Coki Bay with
its Coral Sea dome out in the bay would be a grat place to stop, but what do we
do with the luggage? Then, we'd pass a large supermarket were we might find
supplies not available on St. John. I'll ask Louisa. But again, what do we do
to safeguard the luggage? And how long would the taxi guy wait?

(When we did a bareboat charter out of Red Hook seven years ago, we stayed at a
B&B in Charlotte Amalie and took a taxi to Red Hook. The taxi driver said he
didn't mind waitng while we shopped. But then he went west to pick up his girl
friend, gave us a tour along a north coast of ST. thomas, left the girl friend
off at the Magen Bay hotel she worked in, waited for us at th supermarket,
drove us to Red Hook, and charged the total mileage, but no waiting time.
Interesting.)

Taking the ferry together, picking up the car in Cruz Bay near the ferry dock,
shopping in Cruz Bay, going through the National Park Hdqtrs building there at
the docks, and driving to Maho Bay would take about four or five hours at
island pace.

Then, I don't want to plan our time at Maho Bay, but we should reserve a day for
Annaberg and the eastern end of the island; another day for Cinnamon and Trunk
Bays; a day or two vegging out at Maho; a day on the water; two days to get
there and one day to get to St. Croix. That's 7-8 days of which 5-6 would be
at Maho.

How does this sound?

A week in the sun

Message 39496 · Pia Walker · 8 Oct 2004 19:41:39 · Top

Wonderful - can I come? :>)

Pia
----- Original Message -----
From: "Priscilla M. Burrage" <pburrage@uvm.edu>
To: <strathspey@strathspey.org>
Sent: Friday, October 08, 2004 4:30 PM
Subject: A week in the sun

> Well, I've read a guidebook on Puerto Rico that included a chapter on
Vieques.
> It said that most people go there because of the 22 white sand beaches.
Great
> if we were about forty yeears younger and didn't run scared of skin
cancer.
> (You know Peter sees the skin doc once a year now as he hasn't had a
serious
> spot for over ten years. And even went a whole year without needing to
have a
> rough spot removed.) We had been to Puerto Rico itself about five years
ago
> after a the second English week on St. Croix. It's not a comfortable
island to
> visit as you don't know whether you're visiting a potential US state, an
> independent Hispanic country, or a US possession convinced it isn't
getting
> enough of a handout.
>
> Then I looked up flying to Puerto Rico vs. flying to the Virgin Islands.
It's
> the same price even though the Virgin Islands flight stops at San Juan,
> PR!!!(!)
> And if we stopped off at Puerto Rico, we'd have to pay for the next little
leg
> of the journey which upsets my Scottish genes. . .
>
> Guess we are in favor of St. John, having said that, Maho Bay on St. John
is our
> first choie, as the Concordia complex is in an inconvenient spot for
travel or
> eating out or buying fresh food to eat in.
>
> OK, so we're for the Harmony apartments above the Maho tents. Can enjoy
the
> Maho activities; get to Trunk Bay in about ten minutes for the NP snorkel
> trail; drive to Cruz Bay for supper out or grocery shopping, a visit with
> Louisa and Paco, who live there, etc. Maho is also close to the Annaberg
sugar
> plantation ruins (fixed up by the National Park guys).
>
> Peter would rent a car with his discount. A jeep is recommended, but he
would
> probably go for four-wheel plus a bit of non-dust comfort.
>
> The rest of this email shows that I earned my living planning the
logistics of
> change.
>
> How do we get there? Well, to fly from either Madison or Burlington takes
one
> grueling day or a stayover on St. Thomas. As we would not be able to plan
on
> meeting part way through the trip, the safest approach is to get to St.
Thomas
> and stay overnight at a cheap hotel, rare, but available. (Best Western
Carib,
> one bay east of the airport, $100/night. Most of the others are above
$200.)
> We could then meet at breakfast the next morning.
>
> The drive from the airport in the SW part of ST. Thomas to Red Hook on NW
corner
> goes over the top of the mountain with great views. On the way, Coki Bay
with
> its Coral Sea dome out in the bay would be a grat place to stop, but what
do we
> do with the luggage? Then, we'd pass a large supermarket were we might
find
> supplies not available on St. John. I'll ask Louisa. But again, what do
we do
> to safeguard the luggage? And how long would the taxi guy wait?
>
> (When we did a bareboat charter out of Red Hook seven years ago, we
stayed at a
> B&B in Charlotte Amalie and took a taxi to Red Hook. The taxi driver said
he
> didn't mind waitng while we shopped. But then he went west to pick up his
girl
> friend, gave us a tour along a north coast of ST. thomas, left the girl
friend
> off at the Magen Bay hotel she worked in, waited for us at th supermarket,
> drove us to Red Hook, and charged the total mileage, but no waiting time.
> Interesting.)
>
> Taking the ferry together, picking up the car in Cruz Bay near the ferry
dock,
> shopping in Cruz Bay, going through the National Park Hdqtrs building
there at
> the docks, and driving to Maho Bay would take about four or five hours at
> island pace.
>
> Then, I don't want to plan our time at Maho Bay, but we should reserve a
day for
> Annaberg and the eastern end of the island; another day for Cinnamon and
Trunk
> Bays; a day or two vegging out at Maho; a day on the water; two days to
get
> there and one day to get to St. Croix. That's 7-8 days of which 5-6 would
be
> at Maho.
>
> How does this sound?
>

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