strathspey Archive: Internet dances

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Internet dances

Message 37686 · Campbell Downie · 11 Feb 2004 04:41:17 · Top

Hi

For some time I have made a hobby of collecting dances that have been posted individually on the
strathspey server. I have noticed that it is often not possible to trace these dances by means of the
search facility on the server page

I have therefore compiled a file containing instructions for 262 of these dances. I do not pretend it is
comprehensive, but it contains many interesting dances.

The file was prepared in Wordperfect (.wpd) format, but I have also saved a version in MSWord
(.doc) format. Some of the formatting is lost in the second version but it is still quite clear. The wpd
version is 640K, the doc version is 1170K. Zipped by Winzip the files measure 194K and 171K
respectively

I should be very pleased to send this information to anyone who can make use of it
Please let me know which version you would prefer

Cheers

Campbell

Campbell Downie
PO Box 101269
Scottsville 3209
South Africa
Tel & Fax +27 (0)33 3961238
Cell 083 949 5640

Internet dances

Message 37687 · Pia Walker · 11 Feb 2004 09:46:02 · Top

Yes please - what a wonderful thing - .doc format for me, please!

I have just filled in one of these survey forms which ask what our hobbies
are - have you noticed they never have things like dancing, and collecting
internet dances :>) - perhaps we should insist that as a minority ethnic
underground culture it is against our human rights - the Geneva Convention
and pure bad manners not to have our hobbies stated on survey forms :>)

Pia
----- Original Message -----
From: "Campbell Downie" <calmdown@futurenet.co.za>
To: "strathspey" <strathspey@strathspey.org>
Sent: Wednesday, February 11, 2004 3:41 AM
Subject: Internet dances

> Hi
>
> For some time I have made a hobby of collecting dances that have been
posted individually on the
> strathspey server. I have noticed that it is often not possible to trace
these dances by means of the
> search facility on the server page
>
> I have therefore compiled a file containing instructions for 262 of these
dances. I do not pretend it is
> comprehensive, but it contains many interesting dances.
>
> The file was prepared in Wordperfect (.wpd) format, but I have also saved
a version in MSWord
> (.doc) format. Some of the formatting is lost in the second version but
it is still quite clear. The wpd
> version is 640K, the doc version is 1170K. Zipped by Winzip the files
measure 194K and 171K
> respectively
>
> I should be very pleased to send this information to anyone who can make
use of it
> Please let me know which version you would prefer
>
> Cheers
>
> Campbell
>
>
>
> Campbell Downie
> PO Box 101269
> Scottsville 3209
> South Africa
> Tel & Fax +27 (0)33 3961238
> Cell 083 949 5640
>

Internet dances

Message 37688 · Christina France · 11 Feb 2004 10:13:29 · Top

Campbell,
Yes please in doc format.
Thanks
Christina

Internet dances

Message 37691 · Eric Clyde · 11 Feb 2004 16:25:57 · Top

Thanks for going to all of that work. I would like a copy in Word Perfect
format, please.

Eric Clyde
Ottawa Branch

----- Original Message -----
From: "Campbell Downie" <calmdown@futurenet.co.za>
To: "strathspey" <strathspey@strathspey.org>
Sent: Tuesday, February 10, 2004 10:41 PM
Subject: Internet dances

> Hi
>
> For some time I have made a hobby of collecting dances that have been
posted individually on the
> strathspey server. I have noticed that it is often not possible to trace
these dances by means of the
> search facility on the server page
>
> I have therefore compiled a file containing instructions for 262 of these
dances. I do not pretend it is
> comprehensive, but it contains many interesting dances.
>
> The file was prepared in Wordperfect (.wpd) format, but I have also saved
a version in MSWord
> (.doc) format. Some of the formatting is lost in the second version but
it is still quite clear. The wpd
> version is 640K, the doc version is 1170K. Zipped by Winzip the files
measure 194K and 171K
> respectively
>
> I should be very pleased to send this information to anyone who can make
use of it
> Please let me know which version you would prefer
>
> Cheers
>
> Campbell
>
>
>
> Campbell Downie
> PO Box 101269
> Scottsville 3209
> South Africa
> Tel & Fax +27 (0)33 3961238
> Cell 083 949 5640
>
>

Internet dances

Message 37693 · Anselm Lingnau · 11 Feb 2004 16:55:25 · Top

Campbell --

Thank you very much for your trouble! Would you be willing to send me a
version to put on the Strathspey Server for everyone to download? I think
this could save you some work, with 400 subscribers all writing to you for
your copy? (I can't imagine anyone *not* wanting this.)

Happy dancing,
Anselm

Internet dances

Message 37698 · Lara D. Friedman~Shedlov · 11 Feb 2004 17:45:24 · Top

Anselm, Please let us know when/if this file becomes available on the
Strathspey web site. / Lara

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Lara Friedman~Shedlov "Thwart not the librarian!"
ldfs@bigfoot.com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

On Wed, 11 Feb 2004, Anselm Lingnau wrote:

> Campbell --
>
> Thank you very much for your trouble! Would you be willing to send me a
> version to put on the Strathspey Server for everyone to download? I think
> this could save you some work, with 400 subscribers all writing to you for
> your copy? (I can't imagine anyone *not* wanting this.)
>
> Happy dancing,
> Anselm
>
>
>

Internet dances

Message 37702 · Anselm Lingnau · 11 Feb 2004 18:50:09 · Top

> Anselm, Please let us know when/if this file becomes available on the
> Strathspey web site. / Lara

Grr. That message was supposed to go just to Campbell. -- Well, this only goes
to show that nobody is safe from posting private stuff to the list every so
often ... especially when the party in question isn't quite thinking clearly
after a three-day-long last-minute rush to get a 400+ page book ready for the
print shop on a very tight deadline. (And no, this is not the long-awaited
Strathspey anniversary competition book of dances -- just a ponderous tome on
how to pass the »LPIC« professional Linux certification.)

Now returning to your regular SCD broadcast ...

Anselm

Internet dances

Message 37703 · John Chambers · 11 Feb 2004 20:37:40 · Top

Lara Friedman~Shedlov wrote:
| Anselm, Please let us know when/if this file becomes available on the
| Strathspey web site. / Lara

Yeah; and html would be a more useful format that a word
doc. (And Word can produce html these days.)

This might generally be a good idea, in light of the recent
discussions of Microsoft getting patents on some of their
formatting tricks. This implies a threat to prosecute
people who decode and read Word docs using unapproved
software. It may now be illegal for people running non-MS
software to read Word docs in some parts of the world.

Internet dances

Message 37705 · Jim Healy · 11 Feb 2004 22:15:32 · Top

Greetings!

John Chambers wrote:
>Yeah; and html would be a more useful format than a word
>doc. (And Word can produce html these days.)
Given Anselm's comments on his workload, I have no wish to encourage him to
take on more stuff but if someone were to consider doing some reformatting
of Campbell's magnum opus, I would have thought pdf would be better. Unless,
of course, Micro$oft has bought Adobe when I wasn't looking.

Jim Healy
Perth, Scotland

ps one of my favourite MS claims, from the Hotmail pages, is:
<Some elements © 1999 - 2004 Microsoft® Corporation. All rights reserved.>

very helpful!

_________________________________________________________________
Tired of 56k? Get a FREE BT Broadband connection
http://www.msn.co.uk/specials/btbroadband

Internet dances

Message 37706 · Lara D. Friedman~Shedlov · 11 Feb 2004 23:24:02 · Top

Considering the *quality* of HTML that MSWord creates, I'd have to agree
with Jim that PDF would be preferable to converting the document to HTML
(unless someone is willing to do the HTML without the intervention of Bill
Gates).

/ Lara

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Lara Friedman~Shedlov "Thwart not the librarian!"
ldfs@bigfoot.com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

On Wed, 11 Feb 2004, Jim Healy wrote:

> Given Anselm's comments on his workload, I have no wish to encourage him to
> take on more stuff but if someone were to consider doing some reformatting
> of Campbell's magnum opus, I would have thought pdf would be better. Unless,
> of course, Micro$oft has bought Adobe when I wasn't looking.
>

Internet dances

Message 37707 · Anselm Lingnau · 12 Feb 2004 00:20:32 · Top

Jim Healy wrote:

> Given Anselm's comments on his workload, I have no wish to encourage him to
> take on more stuff but if someone were to consider doing some reformatting
> of Campbell's magnum opus, I would have thought pdf would be better.

Actually what I had in mind is running the Word document through OpenOffice's
PDF generator, which is supposed to be quite good. Now that the book thing is
out of the way I hope to have more time for that kind of thing ... and the
Archos MP3 hard-disk jukebox gadget that I picked up »reduced to clear« after
Tom Cole sang its praises the other day (drool).

Anselm

Internet dances

Message 37718 · John Chambers · 12 Feb 2004 16:17:03 · Top

Jim Healy comments:
|
| ps one of my favourite MS claims, from the Hotmail pages, is:
| <Some elements © 1999 - 2004 Microsoft® Corporation. All rights reserved.>
|
| very helpful!

This sort of vagueness about just what is copyrighted is fairly common in the
publishing industry. One of the conventional examples in discussions of the
subject is that most published versions of things like the works of
Shakespeare have copyright notices. Similarly, a lot of collections of old
music have copyright notices on the bottom of every page. This sometimes
alarms people when they first see it. How can a publisher claim to own the
works of Shakespeare or Playford after all these centuries? Are they just
lying to their readers?

The explanation, of course, is that copyright can cover the work itself, or
it can cover the physical representation. In the case of Shakespeare, the
actual words are long out of copyright, but a particular printed version can
be covered by copyright. So you can sit down and retype the words (or perform
or record them) without asking the publisher's permission. But if you run the
pages through a copying machine or scanner for anything other than personal
use, you have violated the copyright on that printed edition.

This has come up in discussions of ABC transcriptions of old music. An ABC
transcription (or performance or recording) of a 200-year-old tune is legal.
Scanning a printed page might not be, depending on when that page was first
published.

A recent example is the Mel Bay edition of the "Ryan's Mammoth Collection" of
tunes, which was published in the 1880's. It was republished by Cole as "1000
Fiddle Tunes" in the 1940's, using the same plates as the original. Their
publication was of dubious ethicality, since it changed the title and
included no attribution to the original editor or publisher, but it was
almost certainly legal. They had a very vague copyright notice implying that
they owned the music (including titles), but there's little chance that this
claim would hold up in court. Many musicians have recorded tunes in the book,
with no challenge from Cole, so their lawyers probably recognized that their
claim was invalid.

Mel Bay republished it a few years ago, with Patrick Skye as the editor,
again using the original printed material but with a good historical intro
with full attribution. Legally, they can claim a copyright for the
introductory text, but not on the printed music itself or any of the tunes. I
have a copy, and notice that the pages of music don't include a copyright
claim. There is one at the start of the book that is somewhat vague, but not
as general as Cole's claim. (The book is very well done, with wire binding so
it sits well on a music stand. I recommend it to anyone considering buying a
copy. We should encourage any publishers who do such a good job. And, unlike
Cole, Mel Bay has a good record on "intellectual property" issues.)

The ABC user crowd has already had a couple of reports of a publisher sending
email saying that a tune on a web site is in violation of a book that they
published. The person sends back a reply like "That tune way published by
so-and-so in Edinburgh in 1754. How do you claim to own it?" The publisher is
never heard from again. This makes it clear that the publisher knows very
well that they are making a (semi-)fraudulent claim, and know better than to
push it with someone who knows even the minimum about copyright law.

So it's valuable to include anything you know about the origins of a tune or
dance. This information can be very useful when a publisher tries to claim
something that isn't rightfully theirs. And it can help the rightful owners
of new tunes or dances if someone does make commercial use of their work
without permission.

(Microsoft is a notorious bad case. A couple years ago there was a bit of a
fuss when they started extracting images from email and web pages on their
msn.com machines and using them in their ads. Their defense was that their
contract stated that anything on their machines was owned by Microsoft. The
fuss caused them to back down on this practice. But their contracts still
tend to say something like this. So be careful of anything that you leave on
any machine owned by Microsoft or msn.com; you may be giving it to them to do
with as they please.)

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