strathspey Archive: New Dances

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New Dances

Message 37133 · Eddy West · 30 Nov 2003 08:53:08 · Top

Dear All

I have just posted a page of Scottish Country Dances on the Web. Please
look at these dances and if interested download and try them. Feedback
would be much appreciated.

The address is: http://homepages.igrin.co.nz/scotdance/

A sample dance is:

Clare's Welcome
32 bar reel for three couples in a four couple longwise set.
For my daughter Clare on her return from England.
Devised by Eddy West 1992, revised 2003

1-8 First second and third couples dance outward symmetrical reels
of three - first and third couples dance out, second couples
dance in
and up to start, on bar three first couple cross down to the
bottom of the
opposite reel, on bar seven first couple meet in the middle
and turn with right hands to
finish in the middle at the top facing opposite sides, second
couple dance up to the top at
the end and face in.

9-16 First and second couples dance a reel of four across the dance,
at the end first couple pass right shoulders to face first
corners

17-24 First couple dance "Corners pass and turn" with first and then
second corners.
17 First couple pass first corners giving right shoulders.
18 First corners turn with right hands while first couple
curl round to face in.
19 First couple pass first corners giving right shoulders.
20 First couple pass right shoulders to face second corners
while first corners curl into place.
21 First couple pass second corners giving right shoulders.
22 Second corners turn with right hands while first couple
curl round to face in.
23 First couple pass second corners giving right shoulders.
24 First couple pass right shoulders to finish in second
place on own sides while second corners curl into place

25-32 Second, first and third couples dance six hands round and back.

Repeat having passed a couple</p>
Suggested recorded music : "Dance of Diamonds"
recorded by Andrew Rankine on "London Highland Club Diamond Jubilee"

I hope this web site is of interest.

Eddy

does anyone have instructions for:::::::::::

Message 37267 · Nina Mussellam · 6 Dec 2003 07:09:09 · Top

I'm hoping to go to the Vanisle workshop in march 2004( vancouver island BC)
and can find all crib sheets except for 2 dances.
Does anyone have instructions for:
Welcome To The Dance 4X32 Jig ( is this around the room?)
Coat's Ceilidh Calypso 3X32 Reel ( John Drewry Greenburn Book)

Thank you.
Nina Mussellam

New Dances

Message 37378 · John Williams · 22 Dec 2003 09:58:14 · Top

Dear Eddy,
Thanks for this info on your web site.
Unfortunately although I have repeated tried to access it, Iam unable to.
Has it changed. Would appreciate any suggestions of what I may be doing
wrong, if anything. I have also tried a few permutations without success.
Iam very impressed with "Clare's Welcome"........it seems to work well and
is "pleasantly different".
Have a good Christmas : will we see you at all at Hamilton??
Warm regards to Gillian and yourself.
John.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Eddy West" <edg@igrin.co.nz>
To: <strathspey@strathspey.org>
Sent: Sunday, November 30, 2003 8:52 PM
Subject: New Dances

> Dear All
>
> I have just posted a page of Scottish Country Dances on the Web. Please
> look at these dances and if interested download and try them. Feedback
> would be much appreciated.
>
> The address is: http://homepages.igrin.co.nz/scotdance/
>
> A sample dance is:
>
> Clare's Welcome
> 32 bar reel for three couples in a four couple longwise set.
> For my daughter Clare on her return from England.
> Devised by Eddy West 1992, revised 2003
>
> 1-8 First second and third couples dance outward symmetrical reels
> of three - first and third couples dance out, second couples
> dance in
> and up to start, on bar three first couple cross down to the
> bottom of the
> opposite reel, on bar seven first couple meet in the middle
> and turn with right hands to
> finish in the middle at the top facing opposite sides, second
> couple dance up to the top at
> the end and face in.
>
> 9-16 First and second couples dance a reel of four across the dance,
> at the end first couple pass right shoulders to face first
> corners
>
> 17-24 First couple dance "Corners pass and turn" with first and then
> second corners.
> 17 First couple pass first corners giving right shoulders.
> 18 First corners turn with right hands while first couple
> curl round to face in.
> 19 First couple pass first corners giving right shoulders.
> 20 First couple pass right shoulders to face second corners
> while first corners curl into place.
> 21 First couple pass second corners giving right shoulders.
> 22 Second corners turn with right hands while first couple
> curl round to face in.
> 23 First couple pass second corners giving right shoulders.
> 24 First couple pass right shoulders to finish in second
> place on own sides while second corners curl into place
>
> 25-32 Second, first and third couples dance six hands round and back.
>
> Repeat having passed a couple</p>
> Suggested recorded music : "Dance of Diamonds"
> recorded by Andrew Rankine on "London Highland Club Diamond Jubilee"
>
> I hope this web site is of interest.
>
> Eddy
>
>
>
>
>
>
>

New Dances

Message 37379 · Lydia Hedge · 22 Dec 2003 12:51:09 · Top

Private reply sent.

Lydia

> Dear Eddy,
> Thanks for this info on your web site.
> Unfortunately although I have repeated tried to access it, Iam unable to.
> Has it changed. Would appreciate any suggestions of what I may be doing
> wrong, if anything. I have also tried a few permutations without success.
> Iam very impressed with "Clare's Welcome"........it seems to work well and
> is "pleasantly different".
> Have a good Christmas : will we see you at all at Hamilton??
> Warm regards to Gillian and yourself.
> John.
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Eddy West" <edg@igrin.co.nz>
> To: <strathspey@strathspey.org>
> Sent: Sunday, November 30, 2003 8:52 PM
> Subject: New Dances
>
>
> > Dear All
> >
> > I have just posted a page of Scottish Country Dances on the Web. Please
> > look at these dances and if interested download and try them. Feedback
> > would be much appreciated.
> >
> > The address is: http://homepages.igrin.co.nz/scotdance/
> >
> > A sample dance is:
> >
> > Clare's Welcome
> > 32 bar reel for three couples in a four couple longwise set.
> > For my daughter Clare on her return from England.
> > Devised by Eddy West 1992, revised 2003
> >
> > 1-8 First second and third couples dance outward symmetrical reels
> > of three - first and third couples dance out, second couples
> > dance in
> > and up to start, on bar three first couple cross down to the
> > bottom of the
> > opposite reel, on bar seven first couple meet in the middle
> > and turn with right hands to
> > finish in the middle at the top facing opposite sides, second
> > couple dance up to the top at
> > the end and face in.
> >
> > 9-16 First and second couples dance a reel of four across the dance,
> > at the end first couple pass right shoulders to face first
> > corners
> >
> > 17-24 First couple dance "Corners pass and turn" with first and then
> > second corners.
> > 17 First couple pass first corners giving right shoulders.
> > 18 First corners turn with right hands while first couple
> > curl round to face in.
> > 19 First couple pass first corners giving right shoulders.
> > 20 First couple pass right shoulders to face second corners
> > while first corners curl into place.
> > 21 First couple pass second corners giving right shoulders.
> > 22 Second corners turn with right hands while first couple
> > curl round to face in.
> > 23 First couple pass second corners giving right shoulders.
> > 24 First couple pass right shoulders to finish in second
> > place on own sides while second corners curl into place
> >
> > 25-32 Second, first and third couples dance six hands round and back.
> >
> > Repeat having passed a couple</p>
> > Suggested recorded music : "Dance of Diamonds"
> > recorded by Andrew Rankine on "London Highland Club Diamond Jubilee"
> >
> > I hope this web site is of interest.
> >
> > Eddy
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
>

Good Dances

Message 37384 · ewen rennie · 22 Dec 2003 19:15:50 · Top

What makes a good dance?

For me there are two aspects - involvement and flow.

By invovlement I mean the amount of time each dancer in the set is actually
involved - obviously invovlement in being a corner in Posties Jig is
different from the first movements in Trip to Bavaria but simply counting
the amount of bars each person is dancing gives some idea of the interest in
the dance for each dancer.

So here are a few Involvement Percentages to titillate you:-

Trip to Bavaria 81.25%
Postie's Jig 75%
Black Mountain Reel 65%
Langholm Fair 51.5%
Reel of 51st 48.4%
Haymaker's Jig 37.5%

Flow refers to the naturalness of the move from figure to figure and is more
difficult to quantify but obvious when one tries the dance.

Is this meaningful to others?

Ewen Rennie
Dancer with Aurora

Good Dances

Message 37385 · Anselm Lingnau · 22 Dec 2003 20:39:35 · Top

Ewen Rennie wrote:

> What makes a good dance?
>
> For me there are two aspects - involvement and flow.

Yes, but how is »involvement« related to »goodness«? Evidently a dance where
you don't move most of the time needs inordinate amounts of some other
redeeming quality to be considered »good« (and people seem to consider
Flowers of Edinburgh, a 3-couple dance where, in each turn, 3rd couple serves
as place markers only, a »good« dance, judging from its popularity on social
programmes). On the other hand, a dance that has everybody moving all the
time will be considered too busy by many dancers. Some dances can be improved
by adding »involvement« but only up to a certain point -- adding further
involvement deteriorates the dance again. Where that point lies is very
difficult to figure out in a general sense.

Anselm

Good Dances

Message 37386 · Fyreladdie · 22 Dec 2003 22:21:04 · Top

In a message dated 12/22/03 10:17:19 AM, ewen@renniee.freeserve.co.uk writes:

<< What makes a good dance?

For me there are two aspects - involvement and flow. >>

For me there are many aspects that make a dance good or bad. Dances which are
too busy, give the dancers no time to catch their breath. Dances with 1st
couple only active can be boring. But I would put a whole list of things that
contribute to the success of a dance. Music is one of the most important. Good
music can make a poor dance good. Bad music can kill it. I have experimented
using that philosophy. Without names attached I did dances that were considered
good with mediocre music and received unfavorable response from my classes. But
I have also taken very simple dances and put good music to them and they were
received much better. I have devleoped a workshop for beginning dance
devisers, pointing out the different elements that can create a great dance. The more
of these elements present, the more likely, success.
Bob Mc Murtry
San Francisco Branch

Good Dances

Message 37387 · SMiskoe · 22 Dec 2003 22:35:55 · Top

There is another aspect to the making of a good dance and that is the music
that is used. A good tune will raise a mediocre dance to popular heights while
a poor tune will drag down a good dance. I was recently dancing an 18th
century 40 bar strathspey and realized I was having a blast doing it. Then I
wondered was it the dance, after all 40 bars of strathspey???, or was it the
musical arrangement. I think it was a little of both in this instance.
Flowers is a great dance for middle age and up because:
there's not a lot of involvement for the 2's and 3's,
it has a great tune that everyone is familiar with,
ir reminds us of dancing many years past in fun situations.
Cheers,
Sylvia Miskoe, Concord, NH USA

Good Dances

Message 37388 · hways · 22 Dec 2003 22:51:22 · Top

And Flower would only rate 31% on Ewen's Good Dance scale!

Harry

----- Original Message -----
From: <SMiskoe@aol.com>
To: <strathspey@strathspey.org>
Sent: Monday, December 22, 2003 4:35 PM
Subject: Re: Good Dances

> There is another aspect to the making of a good dance and that is the
music
> that is used. A good tune will raise a mediocre dance to popular heights
while
> a poor tune will drag down a good dance. I was recently dancing an 18th
> century 40 bar strathspey and realized I was having a blast doing it.
Then I
> wondered was it the dance, after all 40 bars of strathspey???, or was it
the
> musical arrangement. I think it was a little of both in this instance.
> Flowers is a great dance for middle age and up because:
> there's not a lot of involvement for the 2's and 3's,
> it has a great tune that everyone is familiar with,
> ir reminds us of dancing many years past in fun situations.
> Cheers,
> Sylvia Miskoe, Concord, NH USA
>

Good Dances

Message 37390 · Lee Fuell · 22 Dec 2003 23:41:19 · Top

Classic example - Soldier's Joy. The dance itself, as a collection of
figures, has little to recommend it, but the lead tune, played with
alacrity, makes it fun. Ditto for Mrs. MacLeod.

Lee

-----Original Message-----
From: SMiskoe@aol.com [mailto:SMiskoe@aol.com]
Sent: Monday, December 22, 2003 3:36 PM
To: strathspey@strathspey.org
Subject: Re: Good Dances

There is another aspect to the making of a good dance and that is the music
that is used. A good tune will raise a mediocre dance to popular heights
while
a poor tune will drag down a good dance. I was recently dancing an 18th
century 40 bar strathspey and realized I was having a blast doing it. Then
I
wondered was it the dance, after all 40 bars of strathspey???, or was it the
musical arrangement. I think it was a little of both in this instance.
Flowers is a great dance for middle age and up because:
there's not a lot of involvement for the 2's and 3's,
it has a great tune that everyone is familiar with,
ir reminds us of dancing many years past in fun situations.
Cheers,
Sylvia Miskoe, Concord, NH USA

Good Dances

Message 37389 · Lee Fuell · 22 Dec 2003 23:38:36 · Top

I've always felt that everyone in the set was "involved" 100% of the time.
Even if the dance only calls for a dancer or couple to be standing in place,
they are still playing a role by defining the geography of the set and
serving as reference points for the other dancers.

In the spirit of Ewen's input, though, I tend to prefer dances that offer
the active couple a chance for a solo at some point in the dance -
especially if that solo offers a nice "moment" with one's partner. I find
these far more satisfying than a dance like Trip to Bavaria or Postie's Jig
where for the most part one's partner is just another dancer in the set.

Lee

-----Original Message-----
From: Anselm Lingnau [mailto:anselm@strathspey.org]
Sent: Monday, December 22, 2003 12:42 PM
To: strathspey@strathspey.org
Subject: Re: Good Dances

Ewen Rennie wrote:

> What makes a good dance?
>
> For me there are two aspects - involvement and flow.

Yes, but how is »involvement« related to »goodness«? Evidently a dance where
you don't move most of the time needs inordinate amounts of some other
redeeming quality to be considered »good« (and people seem to consider
Flowers of Edinburgh, a 3-couple dance where, in each turn, 3rd couple
serves
as place markers only, a »good« dance, judging from its popularity on social
programmes). On the other hand, a dance that has everybody moving all the
time will be considered too busy by many dancers. Some dances can be
improved
by adding »involvement« but only up to a certain point -- adding further
involvement deteriorates the dance again. Where that point lies is very
difficult to figure out in a general sense.

Anselm

Good Dances

Message 37391 · Anselm Lingnau · 22 Dec 2003 23:53:57 · Top

Lee Fuell wrote:

> I've always felt that everyone in the set was "involved" 100% of the time.
> Even if the dance only calls for a dancer or couple to be standing in
> place, they are still playing a role by defining the geography of the set
> and serving as reference points for the other dancers.

Right. This is something that I meant to say but forgot to write down in my
earlier message. Having 8 bars of »no choreography« in a dance doesn't mean 8
bars of catatonia. It is a great opportunity for smiling at our partner (and
other bystanders, passers-by, or musicians in the vicinity) and generally
enjoying the goings-on around us. There is also the anticipation of joining
in once more, of exploding into movement from a standing start, which we're
missing if we never stop dancing.

Here again, it is variety that refreshes -- always having to move can be just
as tedious as always having to stand.

Anselm

Good Dances

Message 37392 · Nina Mussellam · 22 Dec 2003 23:58:52 · Top

----- Original Message -----
From: "Donald Lee Fuell" <fuell@mindspring.com>
> In the spirit of Ewen's input, though, I tend to prefer dances that offer
> the active couple a chance for a solo at some point in the dance -
> especially if that solo offers a nice "moment" with one's partner.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
I too prefer a dance where you and your partner can have a bit of solo or a
bit of time to really show off your covering,flow and mastery of a
particular figure.

There are a few dances where you bow and curtsy at the end and think gee -
the first time in 8 times thru the dance that we've even been able to smile
at each other.

nina in BC

Good Dances

Message 37393 · Fyreladdie · 23 Dec 2003 01:54:52 · Top

In a message dated 12/22/03 2:40:03 PM, fuell@mindspring.com writes:

<< I've always felt that everyone in the set was "involved" 100% of the time.

Even if the dance only calls for a dancer or couple to be standing in place,

they are still playing a role by defining the geography of the set and

serving as reference points for the other dancers. >>

Lee,
I like that way of thought.

Bob Mc Murtry

Good Dances

Message 37394 · Fyreladdie · 23 Dec 2003 01:58:07 · Top

In a message dated 12/22/03 2:55:45 PM, anselm@strathspey.org writes:

<< It is a great opportunity for smiling at our partner (and

other bystanders, passers-by, or musicians in the vicinity) and generally

enjoying the goings-on around us. >>

I agree, entirely. It is social dancing and a few bars to pass comment or
whatever is a nice thing to do. The marathon dances offer different challenges
and sometimes snippettes of social interaction.

Bob Mc Murtry

Good Dances

Message 37402 · Martin · 23 Dec 2003 17:30:19 · Top

Anselm wrote:
> Having 8 bars of »no choreography« in a dance doesn't mean 8
>bars of catatonia. It is a great opportunity for smiling (...) and generally
>enjoying the goings-on around us.

Yes, but one could also do this before or after a dance, while making use
of the seats to take the weight of ones weary feet.
We can also sit out occasionally and chat while the others are dancing; no
need to do every dance.

Personally, I prefer busier flowing dances, over those where I'm just being
a pillar or where corners are required to stop & start in 4-bar bits ( M's
Wedding, Pelorus J, Cramond Bridge, etc).
The worst for me is when I find myself in a 5-cp set (but with only 1
active couple) so I have to stand through 5 position twice, 4 position
twice, join in for bits of 3rd & 2nd positions, then stand out at the top
before becoming active cp -- if there's enough music!
Add to this all the standing about while the MC recites every detail of the
instructions....
No, I'd rather keep moving and have a good rest afterwards.

So what is a good dance for me?
One that stands out from the others, one that has a distinctive figure or
structure, so that you won't confuse it with a dozen others; one where you
don't have to ask yourself "Is it cross & cast or turn & cast?" ? One
where the deviser has not tacked on a circle just to make up the number of
bars even if the rest of the choreography does not require it (see bk 43!)

Anselm also wrote:
>always having to move can be just
>as tedious as always having to stand.

Then why do so many people insist on doing every dance on the program?
Dancing is moving, which cannot be tedious if the dances are "good" ones
(whatever your definition may be).

Martin
in Grenoble, France.
http://perso.wanadoo.fr/scots.in.france/scd.htm

Good Dances

Message 37405 · Jock McVlug · 23 Dec 2003 22:46:07 · Top

Anselm also wrote:
>always having to move can be just
>as tedious as always having to stand.

Could this be 'age' related? Try teaching children a dance where first pair
('couple' is usually not a word I use in kids classes) dance 'solo' for 24
of 32 bars! On the other hand they love a dance where everyone is moving
such as the short version of Virginia Reel (4x32)(bars 1-4- All forward and
back, etc)

Jack, having and wishes everyone to have a Merry Christmas!

Good Dances

Message 37407 · Ron Mackey · 23 Dec 2003 22:49:32 · Top

> Here again, it is variety that refreshes -- always having to move can be just
> as tedious as always having to stand.
>
> Anselm
>

Must say that I'm with Anselm on this. Not too keen when the
deviser implies that 'he who stands still is a cissie'! :)

Good Dances

Message 37396 · Rosemary Coupe · 23 Dec 2003 08:54:40 · Top

----- Original Message -----
From: "ewen rennie" <ewen@renniee.freeserve.co.uk>
To: <strathspey@strathspey.org>
Sent: Monday, December 22, 2003 10:15 AM
Subject: Good Dances

> What makes a good dance?
> > For me there are two aspects - involvement and flow.

If you'll excuse a rather heavy-handed response, Ewen, I'll paste in a list
of possible criteria for good dances which I wrote down a couple of years
ago when thinking about this very question. Looking them over again, I think
the second and third may actually be the same. Here they are.

· Sheer exhilaration. At the top of many people's list of favourites are
dances like "Bratach Bana" and "The Irish Rover" in which the dancing couple
reach cruising speed in the first two bars and never slow down. The dynamic
flow of these dances gives a sensation of free, continuous movement as the
leading couple swirl around the corners and through the middle.

· Completeness of pattern. Some dances are satisfying to dance because they
follow a pattern to its logical end. The flight pattern of the first couple
in the four half-reels of "Mairi's Wedding" takes them through all four
corners of the set; they meet briefly in the middle only to soar away again
and again. The last half of "Australian Ladies" has the same quality of
satisfying completeness.

· Aesthetic wholeness. Some dances stand out because their figures make up a
satisfying whole. In particular, dances with a palindrome shape like
"Farewell to Auchterarder" and "White Heather Jig" may be complex, yet they
are easy to remember because one half of the dance so neatly recapitulates
and reverses the other. The same is true of the first half of "Seton's
Ceilidh Band." These dances satisfy our brains' desire for order.

· Interaction and a sense of interdependence: Dances which need careful
phrasing enable dancers to interact by attuning their movements with one
another. In the mirror reels at the beginning of "Maxwell's Rant," for
example, good phrasing by the third couple is vitally important to make sure
the reels flow smoothly. In the "dolphin" reels in "Pelorus Jack," the
dancing couple feel this interdependence as each picks up and relinquishes
the lead, maintaining the flow of the pattern as they do so. The greater the
interaction between partners and with others in the set, the greater the
social pleasure.

· Irresistible music. A tune like "The De'il amang the Tailors" has a direct
line to any dancer's heart; any set of figures set to that tune would be
encored. "Montgomeries' Rant" is a superb dance in its own right, but the
melding of the fast-moving dance to its driving tune makes it a sure winner.

· Complexity resolved. Some dancers are bravura demonstrations of the
devisor's art in creating and then resolving interesting complications. To
dance them is to marvel at the devisor's ingenuity, and successful arrival
at the end of the dance is a feat of navigation! Such dances include Hugh
Foss' clever fugal dances like "Rob Roy."

Finally (getting back to the thread) I'd say a good balance between moving
and standing still on the part of the supporting couples. "The Diamond
Jubilee" and "MacLeod's Fancy" are both good dances, but "MacLeod's Fancy"
allows a little more breathing space or gazing-at-one's-partner time for
supporting couples, leading perhaps to redoubled energy when supporting
couples become leading couples. "Flowers of Edinburgh" is at one extreme and
"Gates of Edinburgh" at the other (all 3 couples moving for 32 bars). The
ideal is somewhere between the Flowers and the Gates!

Happy Christmas, everyone.

Rosemary Coupe
Vancouver

Good Dances

Message 37397 · Pia Walker · 23 Dec 2003 10:21:12 · Top

A good dance to me is something that has been made for the dancer to dance,
not to trip them up.

Simple to suss out - I would rather spend effort acknowledging my
dance-partners than trying to think where to go next.
Flowing
Interactive - I always feel cheated when I dance with someone and don't see
them throughout the dance
and where you afterwards can say to your partners - "I really enjoyed that!"

Pia

Good Dances

Message 37398 · Andrew Buxton · 23 Dec 2003 10:39:53 · Top

It might shed some light on the question to ask "What makes a bad
dance?" For starters, I would say arbitrary sequences of figures that
are hard to remember and could equally well be done in another order.
Several squares are like that - they have the same standard figures and
dancers (including me) sometimes do them in the "wrong" order -
especially because there are so many bars to remember. Anything over
about 40 bars needs to have a pattern - no problem with the Eightsome
Reel!

Another category is dances where there are fussy little figures that
don't get you anywhere - my pet hate is The Birks of Abergeldie. A
third category is dances with awkward transitions between figures that
don't seem to have been properly thought out. Or some have perhaps been
formalised from freer versions in the past? There's one with a pousette
starting part-way round, whose name I've forgotten, which seems very
contrived. Also The Glasgow Highlanders with its fiddly move to
starting positions.

Andrew Buxton
Brighton, UK

----- Original Message -----
From: "ewen rennie" <ewen@renniee.freeserve.co.uk>
To: <strathspey@strathspey.org>
Sent: Monday, December 22, 2003 10:15 AM
Subject: Good Dances

> What makes a good dance?
> > For me there are two aspects - involvement and flow.

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Good Dances

Message 37404 · Ron Mackey · 23 Dec 2003 22:40:59 · Top

te:

> Ewen Rennie wrote:
>
> > What makes a good dance?
> >
> > For me there are two aspects - involvement and flow.
>On 22 Dec 2003 at 19:41, Anselm Lingnau wro

> Yes, but how is »involvement« related to »goodness«? ...................................
.................etc
>Where that point lies is very
> difficult to figure out in a general sense.
>
> Anselm

But in a specific sense it could lie somewhere between music and movement -
as in a dance such as Belle of Bon Accord??

Seasons greetings to everyone and agreement with the previous comments.

Incidentally, I offer the recently heard variation of the famous toast
1. Here's tae us.
2. Wha's like us?
3. Damn few.
4. An' they're a' deid !

The modification is
4. An they're a' dancers.

A guid New Year tae ane an' a'.

Good Dances

Message 37411 · Garth Martens · 24 Dec 2003 04:14:53 · Top

Another factor in which dances are good is association. If I every time I have danced Flowers of Edinburgh I have managed to find a partner who is an excellent dancer/flirter and is also ravishing... well, the dance will be associated with such revelry... whereas if every time I dance it it's with some wretched frown faced nay sayer.....

G

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Good Dances

Message 37412 · Pia Walker · 24 Dec 2003 15:32:10 · Top

It must be something you said :>)

Pia
----- Original Message -----
From: "Garth Martens" <midnight_strathspey@yahoo.ca>
To: <strathspey@strathspey.org>
Sent: Wednesday, December 24, 2003 3:14 AM
Subject: Re: Good Dances

> Another factor in which dances are good is association. If I every time I
have danced Flowers of Edinburgh I have managed to find a partner who is an
excellent dancer/flirter and is also ravishing... well, the dance will be
associated with such revelry... whereas if every time I dance it it's with
some wretched frown faced nay sayer.....
>
> G
>
>
>
> ---------------------------------
> Post your free ad now! Yahoo! Canada Personals
>

Good Dances

Message 37413 · Garth Martens · 24 Dec 2003 18:53:00 · Top

Hah! Probably... I'm always getting myself into trouble :p

Pia Walker <piawalke@nascr.net> wrote:It must be something you said :>)

Pia
----- Original Message -----
From: "Garth Martens"
To:
Sent: Wednesday, December 24, 2003 3:14 AM
Subject: Re: Good Dances

> Another factor in which dances are good is association. If I every time I
have danced Flowers of Edinburgh I have managed to find a partner who is an
excellent dancer/flirter and is also ravishing... well, the dance will be
associated with such revelry... whereas if every time I dance it it's with
some wretched frown faced nay sayer.....
>
> G
>
>
>
> ---------------------------------
> Post your free ad now! Yahoo! Canada Personals
>

---------------------------------
Post your free ad now! Yahoo! Canada Personals

Good Dances

Message 37406 · Bryan McAlister · 23 Dec 2003 22:47:47 · Top

In message <07d801c3c8b7$9fc27ec0$c0974c51@ewen16aug2002>, ewen rennie
<ewen@renniee.freeserve.co.uk> writes
>What makes a good dance?
>
>For me there are two aspects - involvement and flow.
>
>By invovlement I mean the amount of time each dancer in the set is actually
>involved - obviously invovlement in being a corner in Posties Jig is
>different from the first movements in Trip to Bavaria but simply counting
>the amount of bars each person is dancing gives some idea of the interest in
>the dance for each dancer.
>
>So here are a few Involvement Percentages to titillate you:-
>
>Trip to Bavaria 81.25%

Doesnt explain why Trip to Bavaria which is a meaningless wander around
the floor is a fairly unsatisfactory dance. IMHO
--
Bryan McAlister B Arch RIBA ARIAS
Web page www.bryanmac.demon.co.uk
Email bryan@bryanmac.demon.co.uk
Mobile: 07732 600160 Fax: 0870 052 7625

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