strathspey Archive: Bill Clement

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Bill Clement

Message 34376 · Alan Harrison · 6 Mar 2003 13:54:11 · Top

Hi Again,
I have had a direct reply regarding Bill's birthday. If anyone wants to
pass a message to him via me I will print them off, put them in a folder
and present them to him at the party. I'm sure that he would appreciate
it. Please head your mail "Bill Clement" so that I can identify them easily.

Best Regards,
Alan & Julie Harrison
RSCDS Leeds Branch
http://www.piper-alan.co.uk/

Bill Clement

Message 34380 · Ron Taylor · 6 Mar 2003 17:37:27 · Top

Alan, will you please convey my very best wishes to Bill and say I hope he
hasa wonderful birthday, tell hom I miss
seeing him at Society meetings in Edinburgh.

Thank you

Ron Taylor
RON29@blueyonder.co.uk

----- Original Message -----
From: "Alan Harrison" <a.j.harrison@Bradford.ac.uk>
To: <strathspey@strathspey.org>
Sent: Thursday, March 06, 2003 4:53 AM
Subject: Bill Clement

> Hi Again,
> I have had a direct reply regarding Bill's birthday. If anyone wants to
> pass a message to him via me I will print them off, put them in a folder
> and present them to him at the party. I'm sure that he would appreciate
> it. Please head your mail "Bill Clement" so that I can identify them
easily.
>
> Best Regards,
> Alan & Julie Harrison
> RSCDS Leeds Branch
> http://www.piper-alan.co.uk/
>

Email Address query

Message 34390 · Helen P. · 7 Mar 2003 08:14:18 · Top

Several times, now, I've seen comments like:

> You left no private email address.

This seems odd, since all I do is "Forward" the message to see the sender's
address (included as part of the text).

Are there some email programs that can't do this?

-- Helen

Email Address query

Message 34391 · Alan Paterson · 7 Mar 2003 08:26:50 · Top

"Helen P." wrote:
>
> Several times, now, I've seen comments like:
>
> > You left no private email address.
>
> This seems odd, since all I do is "Forward" the message to see the sender's
> address (included as part of the text).
>
> Are there some email programs that can't do this?
>
> -- Helen

...and the particular message which provoked this had (in my e-mail
client - Netscape) Catherine's address prominently displayed in the
"From" field of her message.

No 2 e-mail clients do it the same apparently. Isn't the variety just
wonderful?

Alan

Email Address query

Message 34393 · Steve Wyrick · 7 Mar 2003 15:37:29 · Top

Alan Paterson wrote:

> "Helen P." wrote:
>>
>> Several times, now, I've seen comments like:
>>
>>> You left no private email address.
>>
>> This seems odd, since all I do is "Forward" the message to see the sender's
>> address (included as part of the text).
>>
>> Are there some email programs that can't do this?
>>
>> -- Helen
>
> ...and the particular message which provoked this had (in my e-mail
> client - Netscape) Catherine's address prominently displayed in the
> "From" field of her message.
>
> No 2 e-mail clients do it the same apparently. Isn't the variety just
> wonderful?
>
> Alan

In any of the popular e-mail programs like Communicator, Outlook Express,
Eudora, etc. there's a way to view the entire header of the message and find
the originator's e-mail address, although the method varies between programs
(I've never had experience with AOL so I wonder if they hide this info?
It's the sort of thing they'd do!). So for example, the header on your
message reads as follows:

Return-Path:
<strathspey-return-34391-sjwyrick=ca.astound.net@strathspey.org>
Received: from egal.our-isp.org ([195.88.176.20])
by ca.astound.net (8.12.8/8.12.8) with SMTP id h277SmG1010175
for <sjwyrick@ca.astound.net>; Thu, 6 Mar 2003 23:28:49 -0800 (PST)
Received: (qmail 12694 invoked by uid 3000); 7 Mar 2003 07:26:50 -0000
Mailing-List: contact strathspey-help@strathspey.org; run by ezmlm
Precedence: bulk
X-No-Archive: yes
List-Post: <mailto:strathspey@strathspey.org>
List-Help: <mailto:strathspey-help@strathspey.org>
List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:strathspey-unsubscribe@strathspey.org>
List-Subscribe: <mailto:strathspey-subscribe@strathspey.org>
Reply-To: strathspey@strathspey.org
Delivered-To: mailing list strathspey@strathspey.org
Received: (qmail 12686 invoked from network); 7 Mar 2003 07:26:50 -0000
Message-ID: <3E6849B9.A5185360@paranor.ch>
Date: Fri, 07 Mar 2003 08:26:49 +0100
From: Alan Paterson <alan.paterson@paranor.ch>
X-Mailer: Mozilla 4.76 [en] (WinNT; U)
X-Accept-Language: en
MIME-Version: 1.0
To: strathspey@strathspey.org
Subject: Re: Email Address query
References: <5.1.1.5.0.20030306124953.00a88020@imap.brad.ac.uk>
<000b01c2e441$bdf432e0$9e151e3e@000>
<002001c2e47a$98499f60$7464f7a5@oemcomputer>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Status:

This tells me a number of interesting things, including your address, what
e-mail client and operating system you're using, and how to unsubscribe or
subscribe to this list! -Steve
--
Steve Wyrick -- Concord, California

Set & Link finesse

Message 34392 · Helen P. · 7 Mar 2003 09:24:13 · Top

Note: This is a fiddly-detail discussion about Set & Link.

Two-couple Set & Link:

An experienced teacher suggested that the person on the right might step
*slightly* inwards at bar 3 (versus immediately pivoting on the spot to cast
off). That way, both people start moving as a unit, heading in the same
direction. Then the left person continues inwards, while smoothly handing
the right person into the cast.

It looks better, and both the release of hands and the *slightly* wider
casting off feel more natural and less abrupt.

In the more usual way of dancing this figure, many dancers drop hands too
suddenly, and the very tight pivot by the right person looks (and often
feels) awkward - and out of sync with the smoother steps of the left person.

Three-Couple Set & Link:

There are sometimes difficulties with a dancer in the right position who
casts off too fast, and passes the middle person. Even if the middle person
does a rapid pivot, a wide cast by the right person may still put him/her
ahead. It's hard to give direct visual or tactical cues, because the right
person simply can't see behind; and if s/he abruptly drop hands before bar
3, there's no physical contact either.

If the middle person then does that slight inward step, it can make it
easier for the right person to make this mistake, because the middle person
is not physically blocking the right person from going too far.

However, if the right person has been taught to not drop hands too quickly
(typically, many people let go *before* the end of bar 2), then that inward
step together and *slightly* delayed hand release makes it much hard to err.
These two dancers then cover better during the casting off, and all three
dancers are more unified.

So, Learned Colleagues, what are your opinions about this?

-- Helen (MD USA)

Set & Link finesse

Message 34394 · Adam Hughes · 7 Mar 2003 16:12:35 · Top

Helen P. wrote:
> So, Learned Colleagues, what are your opinions about this?

They haven't answered, so a fool steps in...

> Two-couple Set & Link:
>
> An experienced teacher suggested that the person on the right
> might step *slightly* inwards at bar 3...

I ought not reply until after hearing from Kate who teaches our class
(and is from time to time on strathspey), but surely this is a given?
Since you are facing inward there has to be some motion in that
direction; even if the first step of you your first skip change is to
about 2nd position on the right, your body slides leftward, ie inward,
as you turn.

Surely one shouldn't be *pivoting* at any point in a *travelling* step
(by definition). (Or perhaps this is just a sore point for me, because
I am always getting told off for doing exactly that.)

> Three-Couple Set & Link:
> <snip>

Umm, yes. Practice?

What is it about "cast and chase" that confuses people into overtaking?
Having seen beginners doing Gang The Same Gate a few weeks ago, I have
seen it happen in walk throughs, but everyone managed by their second
time though the dance.

Could you get them to dance the Dancing Master first..? ;-)

Adam
Cambridge, UK.

Set & Link finesse

Message 34395 · Volleyballjerry · 7 Mar 2003 18:32:19 · Top

Helen's detailed suggestions are all worth considering and trying, and could
prove very helpful once tried out physically. With all of that detail, I
shall print out her suggestions and bring them with me to class!

We have been dealing with both the two-couple and three-couple set and link
figures, as Terry Glasspool's THE ENCORE and Muriel Johnstone's WHITEADDER
JIG are both on our branch's annual list as well as on upcoming dance
programs.

I find that there is a tendency, only in the two-couple set and link, to
retain the pas de Basque step from the setting into the linking, rather than
changing to a skip change of step. In all honesty I find myself sometimes
tending toward making this error if I don't concentrate on doing otherwise.
Perhaps Helen's suggestion will assist in overcoming this incorrect tendency.
In THE ENCORE there is a particular challenge in that the set and link is
immediately followed by hands around, so that there are two bar of setting,
two bars of skip change, and then the slip step. (The geography of this is
no difficulty, but one's feet do not always perform 100% correctly!)

Even my most experienced dancers have been finding the three-couple set and
link a bit of a challenge, particularly so in Whiteadder Jig (which we
nonetheless very much enjoy), the figure occurring twice, the second time
perpendicular to the first and the two of them sandwiching a turn which is
two women, dancing couple, and two men! For the three-couple version I have
found that dancers -- backing up from Helen's suggestions of finer points --
often simply become confused by basic geography. I have thus found it
helpful to them to emphasize that the left person in the setting line of
three always passes in front of the line, while the other two must cast in
tandem. Also helpful is imagining a box with eight positions (four corners
and four centerpoints between the corners), two of which are always vacant.

Robb Quint
Thousand Oaks, CA, USA

In a message dated 03/07/2003 12:24:35 AM Pacific Standard Time,
leap@mindspring.com writes:

> Subj:Set & Link finesse
> Date:03/07/2003 12:24:35 AM Pacific Standard Time
> From:<A HREF="mailto:leap@mindspring.com">leap@mindspring.com</A>
> Reply-to:<A HREF="mailto:strathspey@strathspey.org">strathspey@strathspey.org</A>
> To:<A HREF="mailto:strathspey@strathspey.org">strathspey@strathspey.org</A>
> Sent from the Internet
>
>
>
> Note: This is a fiddly-detail discussion about Set & Link.
>
> Two-couple Set & Link:
>
> An experienced teacher suggested that the person on the right might step
> *slightly* inwards at bar 3 (versus immediately pivoting on the spot to
> cast
> off). That way, both people start moving as a unit, heading in the same
> direction. Then the left person continues inwards, while smoothly handing
> the right person into the cast.
>
> It looks better, and both the release of hands and the *slightly* wider
> casting off feel more natural and less abrupt.
>
> In the more usual way of dancing this figure, many dancers drop hands too
> suddenly, and the very tight pivot by the right person looks (and often
> feels) awkward - and out of sync with the smoother steps of the left
> person.
>
> Three-Couple Set & Link:
>
> There are sometimes difficulties with a dancer in the right position who
> casts off too fast, and passes the middle person. Even if the middle
> person
> does a rapid pivot, a wide cast by the right person may still put him/her
> ahead. It's hard to give direct visual or tactical cues, because the right
> person simply can't see behind; and if s/he abruptly drop hands before bar
> 3, there's no physical contact either.
>
> If the middle person then does that slight inward step, it can make it
> easier for the right person to make this mistake, because the middle person
> is not physically blocking the right person from going too far.
>
> However, if the right person has been taught to not drop hands too quickly
> (typically, many people let go *before* the end of bar 2), then that inward
> step together and *slightly* delayed hand release makes it much hard to
> err.
> These two dancers then cover better during the casting off, and all three
> dancers are more unified.
>
> So, Learned Colleagues, what are your opinions about this?
>
> -- Helen (MD USA)
>
>

Set & Link finesse

Message 34399 · Helen P. · 8 Mar 2003 07:17:40 · Top

From: "Linda Gaul" <the.gauls@btinternet.com> wrote:
Sent: Friday, March 07, 2003 1:25 PM

> I also suggest that if the dancer on the left (one the dancing
> thru the centre) had his/her hand facing up and the dancer on the right
> has his/her hand on top, the guiding movement is even easier.

Mmm, yes, I always prefer that, too. It give a nice "platform" which helps
stabilize and direct the rightmost person as they start to cast. BTW, I
also love when that's well done in J.B. Milne, allowing 1W to finish the BH
turn still facing 1M, then pull back RSh for a gorgeous swirl into the cast
off.

"Adam Hughes" <adamoutside@yahoo.co.uk> wrote:
> They haven't answered, so a fool steps in...

Ah, but aren't we all Dancing Fools? <g>

> Helen P. wrote:
>> Two-couple Set & Link:
>> An experienced teacher suggested that the person on the right
>> might step *slightly* inwards at bar 3...

"Adam Hughes" <adamoutside@yahoo.co.uk> wrote:
> surely this is a given? Since you are facing inward
> there has to be some motion in that direction

It's more the direction of the right foot, which can extend to the front,
side, or partly behind at bar 3. One can pivot on the left foot, swinging
the right foot from the sideline to directly behind (the body turning to
follow). Yes, then the left shoulder must move inwards as the right
shoulder moves outwards, but the body's center of gravity doesn't.

This seems like what happens in travelling pas de basque, where one "follows
the foot" extending into a jete.

"Adam Hughes" <adamoutside@yahoo.co.uk> wrote:
>> Three-Couple Set & Link:
> What is it about "cast and chase" that confuses people into overtaking?

Maybe part of it is that the rightmost person can start pulling back the
right shoulder to cast more quickly, since that hand is free.

Robb Quint <Volleyballjerry@aol.com> wrote:
> I find that there is a tendency, only in the two-couple set and link, to
> retain the pas de Basque step from the setting into the linking, rather
than
> changing to a skip change of step...
> Perhaps Helen's suggestion will assist in overcoming this incorrect
tendency.

Interesting point. Seems like the step forward and delayed hand release
would indeed make it harder to do pas de basque.

Speaking of Muriel Johnstone, tomorrow I'll be dancing to her delightful
live playing with Keith Smith. Can't wait! <G>

-- Helen (MD USA)

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