strathspey Archive: briefings...a la Ramblewood!!! YES!

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briefings...a la Ramblewood!!! YES!

Message 32897 · Marilynn Knight · 8 Dec 2002 14:58:41 · Top

The past two Septembers I have attended Ramblewood. I was so impressed by
the briefs/recaps. Very kind, yet succinct, cleanly articulated, in sum,
very professional. I suspect that is the Washington Branch norm??
Personally, I don't care for the 'looking at crib sheets' on the dance
floor, but that is more an 'aesthetics perspective'. If that is what my
partner/set needs, who am I to protest. I do know I do deeply appreciate a
well-delivered brief/recap without extraneous, distracting noise in the
room...


I would rather a walk-through than a sloppily, incoherent talk-through,
especially delivered by a teacher who has a prelim/full. At times like
that, I feel like a closet 'red queen' and wish the RSCDS dance police would
pop up out of nowhere to immediately remove the designations from said
individuals....


Ranting can seem like a Righteous Moment???? :-)


Marilynn Latta Knight

Columbia, SC where we did not lose our power in the Ice Storm.....

briefings...a la Ramblewood!!! YES!

Message 32914 · Patricia Ruggiero · 9 Dec 2002 04:36:04 · Top

Marilynn wrote:

"The past two Septembers I have attended Ramblewood. I was so impressed by
the briefs/recaps. Very kind, yet succinct, cleanly articulated, in sum,
very professional. I suspect that is the Washington Branch norm??"

The Ramblewood committee draws from many of the groups in the mid-Atlantic
region: Washington, Northern Virginia, Baltimore, Delaware Valley, and
others I am neglecting to mention. Organization and content of the weekend
reflect the very high standards of its founders, standards which have been
maintained by successive committees.

Pat
Charlottesville, Virginia USA
where we also did not lose our power in what was mostly a snowfall, with
only a final coating of ice...

briefings...a la Ramblewood!!! YES!

Message 33025 · Elainerb · 14 Dec 2002 00:50:08 · Top

In a message dated 12/8/2002 8:59:21 AM Eastern Standard Time,
marilynnk@scchamber.net writes:

> The past two Septembers I have attended Ramblewood. I was so impressed by
> the briefs/recaps. Very kind, yet succinct, cleanly articulated, in sum,
> very professional. I suspect that is the Washington Branch norm??
>


The Ramblewood committee and MC's are mainly from DC, Virginia and Delaware
Valley area .

Come back next year for more great teaching, and great briefings ( 2
delaware Valley MC's for next year..........)

Elaine (Ramblewood Committee member)

briefings...a la Ramblewood!!! YES!

Message 33029 · Helen P. · 14 Dec 2002 09:29:28 · Top

Scottish Weekend, Inc., (SW) is a private company, which is run for the
personal profit of its members. It is not a part of the RSCDS. In fact, it
has suppressed local RSCDS activities by draining personnel and materials
away from the dances which used to occur in the Washington, DC, area in
summer and early September. The laborers receive no compensation nor
recognition for their work.

If you approve of SW Committee members who:

hostilely scream at the top of their voices at other dancers on the dance
floor;

spend five solid minutes berating an entire room of dancers as if they
were children;

arbitrarily exclude RSCDS members without warning, procedure, or
explanation --
over the protests of dozens of RSCDS teachers, officials, dancers, and
musicians;

do not limit their abusive actions to merely verbal;

openly humiliate a beginner, demanding over and over that he not attend
the next event because he isn't welcome; and

steal RSCDS group names and money to replace RSCDS information for the
newsletter with
pages of unauthorized and unpaid for SW advertising (taking blatant
advantage of the usual editor's absence as she cares for her newborn son);

then by all means attend SW next year.

One of the many, across several U.S. states, who object to this unethical
and abusive behavior,
Helen

Identification of sports injuries requiring surgery

Message 33036 · Eric Clyde · 14 Dec 2002 16:35:01 · Top

There is an interesting news item on the BBC news site on the use of
ultrasound to identify injuries require surgery as distinct from those which
can be treated by other means.
Information can be found at http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/2547101.stm

Eric Clyde
Ottawa Branch

briefings...a la Ramblewood!!! YES!

Message 33048 · Anselm Lingnau · 15 Dec 2002 21:18:04 · Top

Helen P. <leap@mindspring.com> wrote:

> [...]
> then by all means attend SW next year.

and Patricia Ruggiero <ruggierop@earthlink.net> added:

> Will be curious to see what follows. I suppose if HP is vituperative
> enough, Anslem will reprimand her.

I'm not about to reprimand anybody just now, but should like to mention
a propos of nothing in particular and from a purely general and
disinterested point of view that the Strathspey list is a medium for the
discussion of dancing (among other things, see the charter on the
Strathspey Server) but NOT the local politics of dancing, which I would
prefer everybody to take up locally where it belongs rather than in a
forum read by 400+ people world-wide, most of which probably don't
really know what the h*** is going on (nor care). I should also like to
remind everybody concerned that wildly abusive and non-topical threads
on the List have been forcibly closed in the past.

Oh, and by the way, dreadful and unspeakable things have been known to
happen to those who keep spelling my first name incorrectly :^)

Anselm
(wearing his list maintainer's bonnet)
--
Anselm Lingnau (Frankfurt, Germany) Strathspey SCD mailing list maintainer
Send mail to <strathspey-help@strathspey.org> for information about the list
Check out http://www.strathspey.org for lots of interesting stuff about SCD!

trying to get it right. Was: briefings...a la Ramblewood

Message 33053 · Patricia Ruggiero · 16 Dec 2002 04:17:53 · Top

Dear Amslen, oops, Anmels, er, Aslemn, ah, Alsemn...oh, drat, Anselm is just
too hard a name for me to type correctly.....

(sorry!)

Pta, uh, Pat.....

Anselm wrote:
"Oh, and by the way, dreadful and unspeakable things have been known to
happen to those who keep spelling my first name incorrectly :^)

trying to get it right. Was: briefings...a la Ramblewood

Message 33054 · Lee Fuell · 16 Dec 2002 04:28:35 · Top

Good one, Pat. Brings up an interesting question: Why is it easier to type
words that are familiar than words or character strings that are not? For
example, try this: "My widget is an Acme model xyz928." The six characters
that make up "widget" are easier to type than the six in "xyz928." Probably
because the spelling of widget is familiar and doesn't require as much brain
power. You don't really have to think about the characters, just the word -
the characters that make it up come easily. "Anselm" is not a common given
name in the USA, so requires more thought to type than, say, "Robert."

I think it's similar to why non-standard SCD figures are always more
challenging, like starting a circle to the right instead of to the left, or
a Petronella turn to the left as in "Frog in the Middle." (Last sentence
added to make this post on-topic...).

Lee

-----Original Message-----
From: Patricia Ruggiero [mailto:ruggierop@earthlink.net]
Sent: Sunday, December 15, 2002 9:18 PM
To: strathspey@strathspey.org
Subject: trying to get it right. Was: briefings...a la Ramblewood

Dear Amslen, oops, Anmels, er, Aslemn, ah, Alsemn...oh, drat, Anselm is just
too hard a name for me to type correctly.....

(sorry!)

Pta, uh, Pat.....

Anselm wrote:
"Oh, and by the way, dreadful and unspeakable things have been known to
happen to those who keep spelling my first name incorrectly :^)

trying to get it right. Was: briefings...a la Ramblewood

Message 33055 · Patricia Ruggiero · 16 Dec 2002 05:02:50 · Top

Lee wrote:

"....You don't really have to think about the characters, just the word -
the characters that make it up come easily...."

I think you're right about that. As an example, when I was growing up in an
Italian town in southern New Jersey, no one ever misspelled my last name.
But here, in central Virginia, "the South"? Folks can't spell it, folks
can't pronounce it, folks don't even know what kind of a name it is....

"... (Last sentence added to make this post on-topic...)."

And I'll add this, to make this post on-topic: We enjoyed a fine afternoon
of SCD in Richmond, Virginia. Stella Fogg had prepared a strong program.
The music of David Wiesler and Mara Beamish was excellent. The Richmond
folks are a gracious and hospitable group, always welcoming dancers with a
beautifully decorated hall and a most generous refreshments table. Anyone
in the area should not overlook the opportunity to dance with these fine
folks.

Pat Ruggiero
Charlottesville, Virginia
USA

USA / GB

Message 33078 · ron.mackey · 16 Dec 2002 22:26:04 · Top

>
> Do folk in Great Britain ever put an 's' on 'folk'?
>
> For me, it's a plural like sheep, deer, etc.
>
> Martin

Would you agree that 'folk' is the adjective and 'folks' are people?

Happy Dancing
Cheers :)
Ron

Ron Mackey. London Branch (and Croydon)
39, Grove Park Road,
Mottingham
London SE9 4NS

USA / GB

Message 33079 · Colleen Putt · 16 Dec 2002 22:56:14 · Top

----- Original Message -----
From: <ron.mackey@mail.btinternet.com>
To: <strathspey@strathspey.org>
Sent: Monday, December 16, 2002 4:57 PM
Subject: Re: USA / GB

>
> >
> > Do folk in Great Britain ever put an 's' on 'folk'?
> >
> > For me, it's a plural like sheep, deer, etc.
> >
> > Martin
>
> Would you agree that 'folk' is the adjective and 'folks' are people?
>
> Happy Dancing
> Cheers :)
> Ron
>
>
> Ron Mackey. London Branch (and Croydon)
> 39, Grove Park Road,
> Mottingham
> London SE9 4NS

USA / GB

Message 33081 · Alasdair Graham · 16 Dec 2002 23:13:49 · Top

Noun "Folks"
1) Your parents

Noun "Folk"
1) People in general
2) A social division of (usually preliterate) people
3) People descended from a common ancestor
4) The traditional and typically anonymous music that is an expression of
the life of people in a community

Alasdair Graham
From <wordweb.info >
http://www.helensburgh-rscds.fsnet.co.uk/index.htm

----- Original Message -----
From: <ron.mackey@mail.btinternet.com>
To: <strathspey@strathspey.org>
Sent: Monday, December 16, 2002 8:57 PM
Subject: Re: USA / GB

>
> >
> > Do folk in Great Britain ever put an 's' on 'folk'?
> >
> > For me, it's a plural like sheep, deer, etc.
> >
> > Martin
>
> Would you agree that 'folk' is the adjective and 'folks' are people?
>
> Happy Dancing
> Cheers :)
> Ron
>
>
> Ron Mackey. London Branch (and Croydon)
> 39, Grove Park Road,
> Mottingham
> London SE9 4NS

USA / GB

Message 33086 · SallenNic · 17 Dec 2002 00:46:23 · Top

In a message dated 16/12/02 10:16:58 am, martin.sheffield@wanadoo.fr writes:

<< Do folk in Great Britain ever put an 's' on 'folk'?

For me, it's a plural like sheep, deer, etc. >>

Yes, I do; as in, "Come on folks, let's ....."

Nicolas B., Lanark, Scotland.

USA / GB

Message 33123 · Martin.Sheffield · 17 Dec 2002 17:17:25 · Top

Ron wrote:

> Would you agree that 'folk' is the adjective and 'folks' are people?

Yes and no.
Some good folk songs (adj)

The old folk at home are having a ball (plural noun).

And, as far as I remember, all those years ago when I lived in GB, there
was no other form used there.
Times are changing, judging from other people's responses showing that they
feel "folks" to be the plural form.
Could this be due to transatlantic influence?
In the southeast of England "folk" wasn't used much at all -- until tv
presenters started aping their American counterparts.

Why should Americans use a form that was not used in England? 'cause most
of them came from somewhere else!

I'll say no more, or Anselm & Marylinn will flay me alive.

Martin

Martin

USA / GB

Message 33127 · Marilynn Knight · 17 Dec 2002 18:31:02 · Top

Ah, but your spelling is friendly, and amusing to boot, Martine!!!!

-----Original Message-----
From: Martin [mailto:martin.sheffield@wanadoo.fr]
Sent: Tuesday, December 17, 2002 7:56 AM
To: strathspey@strathspey.org
Subject: RE: USA / GB

Marlybin wrote:

>Was I too subtle?

Too subtle for me; I just assumed I had misspelt your name -- again.

Martin

USA / GB

Message 33128 · Marilynn Knight · 17 Dec 2002 18:33:41 · Top

Ah, Mrtn, what a wonderfully aerobic laugh you gave me.... I, who couldn't
flail a flea...oh, maybe on occasion, verbally, but then only when
well-deserved...

-----Original Message-----
From: Martin [mailto:martin.sheffield@wanadoo.fr]
Sent: Tuesday, December 17, 2002 8:03 AM
To: strathspey@strathspey.org
Subject: Re: USA / GB

Ron wrote:

> Would you agree that 'folk' is the adjective and 'folks' are
people?

Yes and no.
Some good folk songs (adj)

The old folk at home are having a ball (plural noun).

And, as far as I remember, all those years ago when I lived in GB, there
was no other form used there.
Times are changing, judging from other people's responses showing that they
feel "folks" to be the plural form.
Could this be due to transatlantic influence?
In the southeast of England "folk" wasn't used much at all -- until tv
presenters started aping their American counterparts.

Why should Americans use a form that was not used in England? 'cause most
of them came from somewhere else!

I'll say no more, or Anselm & Marylinn will flay me alive.

Martin

Martin

USA / GB

Message 33142 · Colleen Putt · 17 Dec 2002 22:00:39 · Top

----- Original Message -----
From: Martin <martin.sheffield@wanadoo.fr>
To: <strathspey@strathspey.org>
Sent: Tuesday, December 17, 2002 9:02 AM
Subject: Re: USA / GB

> Ron wrote:
>
> > Would you agree that 'folk' is the adjective and 'folks' are
people?
>
> Yes and no.
> Some good folk songs (adj)
>
> The old folk at home are having a ball (plural noun).
>
> And, as far as I remember, all those years ago when I lived in GB, there
> was no other form used there.
> Times are changing, judging from other people's responses showing that
they
> feel "folks" to be the plural form.
> Could this be due to transatlantic influence?
> In the southeast of England "folk" wasn't used much at all -- until tv
> presenters started aping their American counterparts.
>
> Why should Americans use a form that was not used in England? 'cause most
> of them came from somewhere else!
>
> I'll say no more, or Anselm & Marylinn will flay me alive.
>
> Martin
>
> Martin
>

USA / GB

Message 33143 · Stella Fogg · 17 Dec 2002 22:17:00 · Top

And it's oh, but I'm longing for my ain folk
Tho' they be but lowly, puir and plain folk
I am far beyond the sea, but my heart will ever be
At hame in dear auld Scotland wi' my ain folk

Stella Fogg
Richmond, VA (sniff, sniff)

Would you agree that 'folk' is the adjective and 'folks' are
> people?
> >
> > Yes and no.
> > Some good folk songs (adj)
> >
> > The old folk at home are having a ball (plural noun).
> >
> > And, as far as I remember, all those years ago when I lived in GB, there
> > was no other form used there.
> > Times are changing, judging from other people's responses showing that
> they
> > feel "folks" to be the plural form.
> > Could this be due to transatlantic influence?
> > In the southeast of England "folk" wasn't used much at all -- until tv
> > presenters started aping their American counterparts.
> >
> > Why should Americans use a form that was not used in England? 'cause
most
> > of them came from somewhere else!
> >
> > I'll say no more, or Anselm & Marylinn will flay me alive.
> >
> > Martin
> >
> > Martin
> >
>

USA / GB

Message 33145 · Helen P. · 17 Dec 2002 23:22:28 · Top

And by way of contrast:

Way down upon de Swanee ribber,
Far, far away,
Dere's wha my heart is turning ebber,
Dere's wha de old folks stay.
All up and down de whole creation,
Sadly I roam,
Still longing for de old plantation,
And for de old folks at home.
_____

Wish I could've made it to the Richmond dance to see all the nice folks...

-- Helen

From: "Stella Fogg" <stellaf@attbi.com>
Sent: Tuesday, December 17, 2002 4:23 PM

> And it's oh, but I'm longing for my ain folk
> Tho' they be but lowly, puir and plain folk
> I am far beyond the sea, but my heart will ever be
> At hame in dear auld Scotland wi' my ain folk
>
> Stella Fogg
> Richmond, VA (sniff, sniff)

USA / GB

Message 33202 · Ian Thomson · 17 Dec 2002 02:11:44 · Top

At 08:57 16/12/02 +0000, you wrote:

> >
> > Do folk in Great Britain ever put an 's' on 'folk'?
> >
> > For me, it's a plural like sheep, deer, etc.
> >
> > Martin
Conversely, in the UK and Australia we say "Maths" whereas in the USA they
say "Math".

Ian

Ian Thomson,
"Braeburn",
27 Thomas Place,
Upper Kedron,
Queensland 4055, Australia.

Ph. (07) 3851 1164

E-mail: i.thomson@qut.edu.au
or ithomson@bretts.net.au

USA / GB

Message 33059 · Martin.Sheffield · 16 Dec 2002 11:15:44 · Top

Do folk in Great Britain ever put an 's' on 'folk'?

For me, it's a plural like sheep, deer, etc.

Martin

USA / GB

Message 33061 · Marilynn Knight · 16 Dec 2002 13:36:21 · Top

Having lived in both GB and USA, may I say how much I love, and appreciate,
what I'd like to consider my 'strathspey family' which is/are so important
to me, in so many ways.
Thanks, Anselm, for making it possible for us to maintain balanced
communication on a subject that clearly we all love.

Sincerely,
Marilynn Latta Knight
In currently clear-sky South Carolina

PS: Thanks for having a unique first name which is so beautifully
phonetic...:)

-----Original Message-----
From: Martin [mailto:martin.sheffield@wanadoo.fr]
Sent: Monday, December 16, 2002 4:26 AM
To: strathspey@strathspey.org
Subject: USA / GB

Do folk in Great Britain ever put an 's' on 'folk'?

For me, it's a plural like sheep, deer, etc.

Martin

USA / GB

Message 33069 · Pia Walker · 16 Dec 2002 18:14:02 · Top

Thank you Cousin Marilynn - And I totally agree with your words about Anslm

Cousin Pie

----- Original Message -----
From: Marilynn Knight <marilynnk@scchamber.net>
To: <strathspey@strathspey.org>
Sent: Monday, December 16, 2002 12:33 PM
Subject: RE: USA / GB

> Having lived in both GB and USA, may I say how much I love, and
appreciate,
> what I'd like to consider my 'strathspey family' which is/are so important
> to me, in so many ways.
> Thanks, Anselm, for making it possible for us to maintain balanced
> communication on a subject that clearly we all love.
>
> Sincerely,
> Marilynn Latta Knight
> In currently clear-sky South Carolina
>
> PS: Thanks for having a unique first name which is so beautifully
> phonetic...:)
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Martin [mailto:martin.sheffield@wanadoo.fr]
> Sent: Monday, December 16, 2002 4:26 AM
> To: strathspey@strathspey.org
> Subject: USA / GB
>
>
> Do folk in Great Britain ever put an 's' on 'folk'?
>
> For me, it's a plural like sheep, deer, etc.
>
> Martin

USA / GB

Message 33074 · Volleyballjerry · 16 Dec 2002 21:16:58 · Top

This "thread" regarding Martin's question on the pluralization of folk seems
to have become a bit "frayed." Though the subject heading states USA / GB,
Martin has asked only about Britain. And the only response that I've seen so
far on this "thread" is a thank-you to Anselm from Marilynn (which of course
we all feel), to which I see no connection to Martin's question.

In any case, I can't speak for Britain, but the "-s" plural often occurs in
the United States as an informal equivalent of "people," e.g.: "Will you all
of you folks join me in a salute to Anselm?"

Robb Quint
Thousand Oaks, CA, USA

USA / GB

Message 33075 · Marilynn Knight · 16 Dec 2002 21:22:34 · Top

Robb,
Was I too subtle????? How about a re-read of my note....???
Marilynn

-----Original Message-----
From: Volleyballjerry@aol.com [mailto:Volleyballjerry@aol.com]
Sent: Monday, December 16, 2002 3:17 PM
To: strathspey@strathspey.org
Subject: Re: USA / GB

This "thread" regarding Martin's question on the pluralization of folk seems

to have become a bit "frayed." Though the subject heading states USA / GB,
Martin has asked only about Britain. And the only response that I've seen
so
far on this "thread" is a thank-you to Anselm from Marilynn (which of course

we all feel), to which I see no connection to Martin's question.

In any case, I can't speak for Britain, but the "-s" plural often occurs in
the United States as an informal equivalent of "people," e.g.: "Will you
all
of you folks join me in a salute to Anselm?"

Robb Quint
Thousand Oaks, CA, USA

USA / GB

Message 33122 · Martin.Sheffield · 17 Dec 2002 17:17:23 · Top

Marlybin wrote:

>Was I too subtle?

Too subtle for me; I just assumed I had misspelt your name -- again.

Martin

trying to get it right.

Message 33058 · Martin.Sheffield · 16 Dec 2002 11:15:41 · Top

Lee wrote:
> Why is it easier to type
>words that are familiar than words or character strings that are not?

I wish that were true.
FamiIiar words seem to get my fingers twitching too fast; I have not once
typed "Srtahtpsey" without having to correct the spelling.

Could you change the name of the list please Asmeln?

Martni,
in Brenogle, Dance.

typing and pslleing

Message 33077 · ron.mackey · 16 Dec 2002 22:26:03 · Top

> Good one, Pat. Brings up an interesting question: Why is it easier to type
> words that are familiar than words or character strings that are not? For
> example, try this: "My widget is an Acme model xyz928." The six characters
> that make up "widget" are easier to type than the six in "xyz928." Probably
> because the spelling of widget is familiar and doesn't require as much brain
> power. You don't really have to think about the characters, just the word -
> the characters that make it up come easily. "Anselm" is not a common given
> name in the USA, so requires more thought to type than, say, "Robert."

Lee,
Is it just possible that the qwerty keyboard is set up to provide
easier use for familiar English/American letter strings? :)

Happy Dancing
Cheers :)
Ron

Ron Mackey. London Branch (and Croydon)
39, Grove Park Road,
Mottingham
London SE9 4NS

typing and pslleing

Message 33089 · Norah Link · 17 Dec 2002 01:53:12 · Top

Actually, it was set up to make them more difficult. In the days when the keyboard was developed, mechanical typewriters had difficulty keeping up with the speed of typists. So the keyboard was designed to put frequently used letters in awkward places where a touch typists would have to use a generally weaker digit, and common letter combinations were set up to often be typed with the same hand - much slower than if they alternated.

Even so, the human adapts quite well, and with the advent of electronic keyboards and spellcheckers that allow us to type like the wind without having to be concerned with errors, we can type a lot faster now. And those familiar letter combinations come to the fore. Although in this particular email I have already had to correct myself several times with letter combinations coming out reversed. Isn't auto spellcheck wonderful - as long as we remember to read and discover what the spellcheck thought was correct!

Happy typing...

cheers,

Norah (Montreal)

>
> From: ron.mackey@mail.btinternet.com
> Date: 2002/12/16 Mon PM 03:57:23 EST
> To: strathspey@strathspey.org
> Subject: typing and pslleing
>
>
>
> > Good one, Pat. Brings up an interesting question: Why is it easier to type
> > words that are familiar than words or character strings that are not? For
> > example, try this: "My widget is an Acme model xyz928." The six characters
> > that make up "widget" are easier to type than the six in "xyz928." Probably
> > because the spelling of widget is familiar and doesn't require as much brain
> > power. You don't really have to think about the characters, just the word -
> > the characters that make it up come easily. "Anselm" is not a common given
> > name in the USA, so requires more thought to type than, say, "Robert."
>
> Lee,
> Is it just possible that the qwerty keyboard is set up to provide
> easier use for familiar English/American letter strings? :)
>
>
> Happy Dancing
> Cheers :)
> Ron
>
>
> Ron Mackey. London Branch (and Croydon)
> 39, Grove Park Road,
> Mottingham
> London SE9 4NS
>

briefings...a la Ramblewood!!! YES!

Message 33038 · Patricia Ruggiero · 14 Dec 2002 18:18:01 · Top

You've no doubt seen Helen P.'s rantings about SW in this forum. Rebecca
Sager from Atlanta has posted the first reply. Will be curious to see what
follows. I suppose if HP is vituperative enough, Anslem will reprimand her.

Missed you at the ChristmasWalk dance.

Pat

-----Original Message-----
From: Elainerb@aol.com [mailto:Elainerb@aol.com]
Sent: Friday, December 13, 2002 6:50 PM
To: strathspey@strathspey.org
Subject: Re: briefings...a la Ramblewood!!! YES!

In a message dated 12/8/2002 8:59:21 AM Eastern Standard Time,
marilynnk@scchamber.net writes:

> The past two Septembers I have attended Ramblewood. I was so impressed by
> the briefs/recaps. Very kind, yet succinct, cleanly articulated, in sum,
> very professional. I suspect that is the Washington Branch norm??
>

The Ramblewood committee and MC's are mainly from DC, Virginia and Delaware
Valley area .

Come back next year for more great teaching, and great briefings ( 2
delaware Valley MC's for next year..........)

Elaine (Ramblewood Committee member)

briefings...a la Ramblewood!!! YES!

Message 33040 · Patricia Ruggiero · 14 Dec 2002 19:12:16 · Top

My apologies. This was intended as a private post.

Pat

-----Original Message-----
From: Patricia Ruggiero [mailto:ruggierop@earthlink.net]
Sent: Saturday, December 14, 2002 12:18 PM
To: strathspey@strathspey.org
Subject: RE: briefings...a la Ramblewood!!! YES!

You've no doubt seen Helen P.'s rantings about SW in this forum. Rebecca
Sager from Atlanta has posted the first reply. Will be curious to see what
follows. I suppose if HP is vituperative enough, Anslem will reprimand her.

Missed you at the ChristmasWalk dance.

Pat

-----Original Message-----
From: Elainerb@aol.com [mailto:Elainerb@aol.com]
Sent: Friday, December 13, 2002 6:50 PM
To: strathspey@strathspey.org
Subject: Re: briefings...a la Ramblewood!!! YES!

In a message dated 12/8/2002 8:59:21 AM Eastern Standard Time,
marilynnk@scchamber.net writes:

> The past two Septembers I have attended Ramblewood. I was so impressed by
> the briefs/recaps. Very kind, yet succinct, cleanly articulated, in sum,
> very professional. I suspect that is the Washington Branch norm??
>

The Ramblewood committee and MC's are mainly from DC, Virginia and Delaware
Valley area .

Come back next year for more great teaching, and great briefings ( 2
delaware Valley MC's for next year..........)

Elaine (Ramblewood Committee member)

briefings...a la Ramblewood!!! YES!

Message 33044 · Elainerb · 15 Dec 2002 03:42:53 · Top

But it was well said Pat!

Elaine

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