strathspey Archive: Slippery floors.

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Slippery floors.

Message 30162 · Peter Day · 27 Mar 2002 19:34:37 · Top

Hello,
Some weeks ago one of our dancers in New Jersey slipped and badly
broke her wrist. I have been trying to locate a source of Slip Stop
or an equivalent floor treatment that will not cause us to be thrown
out of the room we dance in. Scottish National Dance Co. in the UK no
longer answer emails. The wooden floor we use, although unpolished,
is very slippery. Some of us have Translite, or other non-slip
soles, or have stuck patches on. Suggestions would be much valued.
Peter Day
--

Slippery floors.

Message 30163 · Stella Fogg · 27 Mar 2002 19:48:39 · Top

RSCDS headquarters used to sell Slip Stop, I bought mine there and intend to
buy some more this summer so hope they still have it in stock.
Stella
Richmond, VA

Slippery floors.

Message 30164 · Volleyballjerry · 27 Mar 2002 19:55:45 · Top

Peter,

Just the thing for you; we find that it works great and has no adverse effect
on floors:
Go to a drafting supply store. They sell a product which is a little porous
cloth bag filled with ground-up gum eraser (looks like a squarish hacky-sack
or mini-haggis!). Drafters use this as an eraser, as under pressure the bag
emits miniscule bits of the rubber. For floor spreading it works two ways.
Either cut the bag open, and keep the material in a shaker of some kind, or
have your dancers, as part of their warm-up, take turns forcibly tossing the
in-tact bag onto the floor, which will with each impact release a small
quantity of the rubber dust. Use as much of the stuff as is necessary to
make the floor safe! It doesn't hurt the floor at all.

Robb Quint
Thousand Oaks, CA, USA

Slippery floors.

Message 30172 · Martin.Sheffield · 27 Mar 2002 22:34:19 · Top

At 19:55 27/03/02, you wrote:
>.... a little porous
>cloth bag filled with ground-up gum eraser
>(...) each impact release a small
>quantity of the rubber dust. (...) It doesn't hurt the floor at all.

But what will it do to your lungs?

I have one or two unpleasant memories of dances where well-intentioned
helpers have been so generous with sprinkling various products on the
floor, that I felt I could hardly breathe.

Personally, I find a non-slip floor very unpleasant, anyway. The danger is
a floor where some parts are slippery and some are not, and you never know
what to expect. It's like driving on a road and suddenly coming upon a
patch of ice, when you thought everything had thawed.
It seems to me that if any kind of slipstop is applied, it could well
increase this danger, since you cannot guarantee it being evenly spread.

Martin
in Grenoble, France.
http://perso.wanadoo.fr/scots.in.france/scd.htm

Slippery floors.

Message 30175 · Lara D. Friedman~Shedlov · 27 Mar 2002 22:53:37 · Top

I tend to agree with Martin.

Rather than sprinkling or spreading things on the floor (which may or
may not damage the floor or the lungs of the dancers), I think a better
solution is for each individual dancer to treat their footwear in
whatever way works best for them. A variety of suggestions have been
posted here, ranging from dampening the soles of one's ghillies with
water to hairspray to special coatings that you paint on. You can also
buy ghillies with the non-slip soles. This seems to me to be the more
flexible approach to the problem, as it allows for a variety of
solutions, depending on the needs and preferences of each dancer.

--Lara Friedman~Shedlov
Minneapolis, MN USA

Quoting Martin <martin.sheffield@wanadoo.fr>:

>
> Personally, I find a non-slip floor very unpleasant, anyway. The
> danger is
> a floor where some parts are slippery and some are not, and you never
> know what to expect. It's like driving on a road and suddenly coming
> upon a patch of ice, when you thought everything had thawed.
> It seems to me that if any kind of slipstop is applied, it could well
>
> increase this danger, since you cannot guarantee it being evenly
> spread.
>

*******************************
Lara Friedman-Shedlov
ldfs@bigfoot.com
*******************************

Slippery floors.

Message 30177 · Norah Link · 27 Mar 2002 22:57:52 · Top

> -----Original Message-----
> From: Pia Walker
> Subject: Re: Slippery floors.
>
>
> I met a highland dancer at a tourist show this autumn - she
> actually used
> hair spray on the soles of her pump - and it sounds logical -
> I haven't used
> it myself yet, as I keep forgetting to bring hairspray in my
> dance bag.
>

The most common thing I've seen at highland competitions is water, but have
heard recommendations on a highland dance list for hairspray and also coke
(as in the beverage). There are as many who will recommend against that
because of the condition it leaves the floor in for the other dancers -
including one person whose daughter slipped in puddles of water left behind
by an overly enthusiastic shoe soaker.

I've also seen Irish dancers tape duck tape to their soles. They said as
long as you remove it promptly after the performance, it works very well. I
tried it, and it did work reasonably well, but can be pulled off during
dancing or get dusty just like everything else.

Personally, I use the previously-recommended Dow-Corning product. If it
gets dusty, you can wipe the dust off with a damp cloth. Just avoid getting
them wet or walking through puddles - it becomes like skating on very good
ice.

(On my highland shoes, so far, I just use lots of sand paper to keep the
soles clean and raise the nap.)

Happy dancing,

Norah Link (Montreal, QC)

Slippery floors.

Message 30165 · RON TAYLOR · 27 Mar 2002 20:00:11 · Top

Purchase it from the RSCDS.
Ron.

Slippery floors.

Message 30166 · Fyreladdie · 27 Mar 2002 20:21:59 · Top

There is a finish called Gym-Seal that they use on athletic floors that is
not slippery. I am not sure where you can find it but would suggest asking
the local school if they use something similar.
I also suggest putting non-slip shoe-goo, Dow Corning 3140, on the bottom
of dance shoes. Because of the difficulty with most dance floors, I coat all
my dancers shoes with the substance before dancing with new shoes. 2 thin
coats put on before first coat is dry provides most a firm step on almost any
surface. Take care not to use other silicon based products as they do not all
work the same.

Bob Mc Murtry
Felton, Calif

Slippery floors.

Message 30167 · Marilynn Knight · 27 Mar 2002 20:29:44 · Top

Invite the janitor to dance with you!!!

-----Original Message-----
From: Peter Day [mailto:peterday@optonline.net]
Sent: Wednesday, March 27, 2002 1:35 PM
To: strathspey@strathspey.org
Subject: Slippery floors.

Hello,
Some weeks ago one of our dancers in New Jersey slipped and badly
broke her wrist. I have been trying to locate a source of Slip Stop
or an equivalent floor treatment that will not cause us to be thrown
out of the room we dance in. Scottish National Dance Co. in the UK no
longer answer emails. The wooden floor we use, although unpolished,
is very slippery. Some of us have Translite, or other non-slip
soles, or have stuck patches on. Suggestions would be much valued.
Peter Day
--

Slippery floors.

Message 30180 · ron.mackey · 28 Mar 2002 00:25:26 · Top

Hi, Marilynn

>. I have been trying to locate a source of Slip Stop
> or an equivalent floor treatment that will not cause us to be thrown
> out of the room we dance in. Scottish National Dance Co. in the UK no
> longer answer emails.

You are the second to mention no answer from Lewis Innes. I saw him
the other week selling from his stall and he said that he was having
difficulty with his web site. Maybe the trouble has spread. I'll
try to 'phone him over the W/E and report any results.
He had Slip-Stop with him.
----------------------------------------
> The wooden floor we use, although unpolished,
> is very slippery. Some of us have Translite, or other non-slip
> soles, or have stuck patches on. Suggestions would be much valued.
> Peter Day

I agree with Martin in preferring a certain amount of 'slide'. Too
much grip can play havoc with the knees and ankles.
Qne of the problems with Slip-Stop is the residue, which can upset
caretakers/janitors and the amount of dust it can raise if applied
too liberally and can affect the breathing.
One answer which can be effective if the floor isn't a
death-trap is to dust the soles of your shoes and wipe off the
excess. It makes for a nice steadying influence. Alternatively, put
some on a large sheet of strong paper and wipe your shoes in it like
a boxer. The only trouble with the latter is that you leave a trail
of foot-prints and can be pointed out as the guilty party !! :)
Happy Easter all....

Happy Dancing
Cheers :)
Ron

Ron Mackey. London Branch (and Croydon)
Mottingham
39-SE9 4NS

Slippery floors.

Message 30169 · Adam Hughes · 27 Mar 2002 20:57:44 · Top

A highland teacher once told me that the best thing for slippery floors
is to rub olive oil into the soles of your ghillies in the afternoon
before an evening's dance. It works surprisingly well, I think, but you
have to ensure the oil has pretty much dried before you dance...

Another teacher-friend uses soapflakes. But don't let people walk on
the dance floor with damp outdoor shoes...

Asking the caretaker to clean the floor might also help; often a
slippery floor is caused by dust, so once over with a mop cures the
problem. All is fine unless they then polish the nice clean floor...

I'm not sure how useful those are.

I prefer dancing without slipstop; I can be forced off the dance floor
by asthma, following a liberal sprinkling. I'll go looking for one of
those drafting erasers...

Adam
Cambridge, UK.

Slippery floors.

Message 30174 · Pia Walker · 27 Mar 2002 22:42:10 · Top

I met a highland dancer at a tourist show this autumn - she actually used
hair spray on the soles of her pump - and it sounds logical - I haven't used
it myself yet, as I keep forgetting to bring hairspray in my dance bag.

I myself use water on a towel in a discreet corner - or I have seen some
bring in a little plastic box with a wet sponge in it (sporran size) - and
also if the floor is very slippery - use orange juice - or lemonade - the
sugar in the liquid makes your soles sticky.

Pia
----- Original Message -----
From: Peter Day <peterday@optonline.net>
To: <strathspey@strathspey.org>
Sent: Wednesday, March 27, 2002 6:34 PM
Subject: Slippery floors.

> Hello,
> Some weeks ago one of our dancers in New Jersey slipped and badly
> broke her wrist. I have been trying to locate a source of Slip Stop
> or an equivalent floor treatment that will not cause us to be thrown
> out of the room we dance in. Scottish National Dance Co. in the UK no
> longer answer emails. The wooden floor we use, although unpolished,
> is very slippery. Some of us have Translite, or other non-slip
> soles, or have stuck patches on. Suggestions would be much valued.
> Peter Day
> --
>

Slippery floors.

Message 30183 · Llyn · 28 Mar 2002 02:55:22 · Top

We also dance on a very slippery floor. We experimented with several
different types of silicone rubber adhesives. After many a trial and error
all of our dancers now use G.E. RTV 118... you can probably find it from a
plumbing supply co. It has to be this exactly! First take a heavy grit
sandpaper and rough up your soles..works great if your shoes are brand new.
Put on some of the stuff...about a quarter size for the ball part of your
foot. Then take a credit card or popsicle stick and really "grind' the stuff
into the sole. This makes it adhere really nicely. I also put some on the
heel portion, but you can skip the arch. Let it dry for 48 hours. This stuff
is not cheap, but it does a lot of shoes!! I've danced on the demo team for
two years with this stuff and it's great! Makes you dance better, because
you need to get up and off the foot...no shuffling! I also, keep a pair
"un-gooed" for the few times we have to dance on carpet :-) Hope this helps.
Llyn Marshall

*----- Original Message -----
*From: Peter Day <peterday@optonline.net>
*To: <strathspey@strathspey.org>
*Sent: Wednesday, March 27, 2002 6:34 PM
*Subject: Slippery floors.
*
*
*> Hello,
*> Some weeks ago one of our dancers in New Jersey slipped and badly
*> broke her wrist. I have been trying to locate a source of Slip Stop
*> or an equivalent floor treatment that will not cause us to be thrown
*> out of the room we dance in. Scottish National Dance Co. in the UK no
*> longer answer emails. The wooden floor we use, although unpolished,
*> is very slippery. Some of us have Translite, or other non-slip
*> soles, or have stuck patches on. Suggestions would be much valued.
*> Peter Day
*> --
*>
*

Slippery floors.

Message 30178 · M.G. Mudrey, Jr. · 27 Mar 2002 22:58:45 · Top

At 10:01 PM 3/27/02 +0000, you wrote:
>I met a highland dancer at a tourist show this autumn - she actually used
>hair spray on the soles of her pump - and it sounds logical - I haven't used
>it myself yet, as I keep forgetting to bring hairspray in my dance bag.

The only significant problem with this is at fragrance free events.....I
have several friends who would reaction strongly to the extent of having to
leave the dance because of asthma.

Mike

M.G. Mudrey, Jr.
Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey
University of Wisconsin-Extension
3817 Mineral Point Road
Madison, WI 53705-5100
USA

Voice: 608-263-5495
Fax: 608-262-8086
Email: mgmudrey@facstaff.wisc.edu

Survey Web Site: http://www.uwex.edu/wgnhs/

Slippery floors.

Message 30181 · John Cahill · 28 Mar 2002 00:30:55 · Top

Our host has all the information one would want about the Dow Corning
solution to slippy shoes on the Strathspey site.
Check http://www.strathspey.org/practice/nonSkid

Cheers,

-John-

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