strathspey Archive: ZIMBABWE CONTRASTS

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ZIMBABWE CONTRASTS

Message 29952 · Volleyballjerry · 14 Mar 2002 17:40:24 · Top

Last night on North America's PBS program "The News Hour" there was an
in-depth report on the recent election in Zimbabwe. This report, as had many
shorter news clips here and there over the previous several days, painted a
rather negative picture of general difficulty, upheaval, strife, and
intimidation. Watching the report, it suddenly occurred to me that over the
same period of time we had been reponding to Malcomb Gillespie's initial
report/request about an upcoming excursion to experience SCD by a Zimbabwe
lakeside, a picture painted in one's mind's eye just about as serenely
bucolic, placid, and delightful as one might imagine. I imply no judgment of
any kind; I was simply struck by the juxtaposition of contrasting pictures
over the same brief time period from a country about which one does not
necessarily hear anything at all on a daily basis.

Robb Quint
Thousand Oaks, CA, USA

Turns in Teviot Brig(ge)

Message 29953 · cputt · 14 Mar 2002 18:13:46 · Top

I am looking for some insight and guidance in the phrasing of the 2 and 1/2
turn that begins this little dance. Anyone?
Tbanks in advance,
Colleen

Turns in Teviot Brig(ge)

Message 29954 · Lara D. Friedman~Shedlov · 14 Mar 2002 18:25:00 · Top

Quoting cputt@Staff.Ednet.NS.Ca:

> I am looking for some insight and guidance in the phrasing of the 2
> and 1/2 turn that begins this little dance. Anyone?
> Tbanks in advance,
> Colleen
>

As I recall, this dance was used in one of the advanced classes at the
Winnipeg workshop a couple of years ago. Although it appears to be a
simple dance on the surface, the phrasing is quite tricky. Before we
did the actual dance, the instructor (can't recall her last name but
the first name was Monique and she was from Winnipeg, I believe) had us
practice turning various amounts in various numbers of bars. I don't
have the instructions at hand right now, so I can't really remember how
the turns go. Perhaps Peter McClure would recall more of the details
on how this dance was taught. As I recall it was a very good lesson.

Lara Friedman~Shedlov
Minneapolis, MN USA

*******************************
Lara Friedman-Shedlov
ldfs@bigfoot.com
*******************************

Turns in Teviot Brig(ge)

Message 29969 · cputt · 15 Mar 2002 16:40:24 · Top

Thanks to all those who offered advice on the turn.
I myself was in a class several years with Frances Grey of Toronto when she
taught this dance. I remember that what she deomonstrated was breath-takingly
simple, but can't for the life of me remember what she said. <grin> I think she
advised three two-bar turns and end with a half in two bars. But I like
Peter's "strong in, easy out", i.e. one and a half in four bars and a slow four-
bar turn. Anyway, it should prove to be a fun challenge for my class.
Thanks again.
Colleen

Turns in Teviot Brig(ge)

Message 29955 · mlbrown · 14 Mar 2002 19:18:06 · Top

If I remember correctly from when the dance was part of the full certificate
(I must get round to oiling the wheels on my Zimmer frame tomorrow), we used
to phrase it as turn one and a quarter in 4 bars, which took us naturally
into turn 2 and a half in 8 - (or am I missing something?)

Malcolm

Malcolm (& Helen) Brown
York (U.K.)

Turns in Teviot Brig(ge)

Message 29958 · John P. McClure · 14 Mar 2002 21:47:40 · Top

On Thu, 14 Mar 2002 cputt@Staff.Ednet.NS.Ca wrote:

> I am looking for some insight and guidance in the phrasing of the 2 and 1/2
> turn that begins this little dance. Anyone?

I agree with Lara about the aptness of Monique Henderson's technique
lesson - timing and phrasing are matters of great importance to her (and
to all of us!). However, I can't remember her specific instructions for
this dance any better than Lara.

I can appreciate the approach suggested by Malcolm - a nice, steady pace
throughout. However, what about "strong in, easy out", i.e., aim for
about 1 1/2 turns in the first four bars, then ease the pace in the next
four. Since you need to bring the 2s in from a standing start, a little
less pace at the end of the first phrase might be a good thing.

One of those nice places where you get to experiment, and use your
judgment.

Cheers,

Peter
(in Winnipeg)

ZIMBABWE CONTRASTS

Message 29956 · res009k3 · 14 Mar 2002 19:20:24 · Top

RELEVANT HISTORY:

During the 1800's there was a territorial war between the different missionary socieites in the UK. The solution
was to divide up the British Empire among the competing
denominations. This division was also expanded into
missionary territories outside the Empire.

Rhodesia/Zimbabwe, along with Korea, was given to the
Church of Scotland/Presbyterian.
This not only explains the SCD connection in modern
Rhodesia but also the number of Presbyterian Churches
in Souther California with Korean languages services.
A further result of this is the UK universities of choice
for university students from former colonies -
Students from "Presby" colonies usually go to
Scottish universities, "Pisky" colonies to
English, etc.
Sudan was given to Catholics
Hawaii was given to Methodists -
Dole [as in pineapples} was a Methodist missionary
family.
Argentina, Hong Kong, South Africa - C of E
Quakers were not a part of this division but were a
strong influence in the Gold Coast/Ghana. While there
they "felt moved to" develop some industry so that their
converts could participate in world trade. There solution
was the production of cacao beans for chocolate.
Cadbury and Roundtree were Quaker missionary families who,
like the Doles, did well by doing good.

This pattern did not hold true in areas where British natives took over from the indigenous:
USA, Canada, Australia, Tierra del Fuego.
Here the religious and SCD patterns follow those of the
UK regions of origin.
SCD is strong in areas where there was a large Presby
presence.
I don't think the Welsh/Methodists in Tierra del Fuego have much of an SCD tradition.
There is a song, music, dance tradition in Appalachia
(not an area with a strong "Pisky" presence),
that has well documented connections with Scotland.

R Goss
[richard.n.goss@gte.net]

ZIMBABWE CONTRASTS

Message 29968 · cputt · 15 Mar 2002 16:29:57 · Top

Dear Richard,
Thank you for this. I had no idea.
Cheers,
Colleen

> During the 1800's there was a territorial war between the different
> missionary socieites in the UK. The solution
> was to divide up the British Empire among the competing
> denominations. This division was also expanded into
> missionary territories outside the Empire.
>
> Rhodesia/Zimbabwe, along with Korea, was given to the
> Church of Scotland/Presbyterian.
> This not only explains the SCD connection in modern
> Rhodesia but also the number of Presbyterian Churches
> in Souther California with Korean languages services.
> A further result of this is the UK universities of choice
> for university students from former colonies -
> Students from "Presby" colonies usually go to
> Scottish universities, "Pisky" colonies to
> English, etc.
> Sudan was given to Catholics
> Hawaii was given to Methodists -
> Dole [as in pineapples} was a Methodist missionary
> family.
> Argentina, Hong Kong, South Africa - C of E
> Quakers were not a part of this division but were a
> strong influence in the Gold Coast/Ghana. While there
> they "felt moved to" develop some industry so that their
> converts could participate in world trade. There solution
> was the production of cacao beans for chocolate.
> Cadbury and Roundtree were Quaker missionary families who,
> like the Doles, did well by doing good.
>
> This pattern did not hold true in areas where British natives took over
> from the indigenous:
> USA, Canada, Australia, Tierra del Fuego.
> Here the religious and SCD patterns follow those of the
> UK regions of origin.
> SCD is strong in areas where there was a large Presby
> presence.
> I don't think the Welsh/Methodists in Tierra del Fuego have much of an
> SCD tradition.
> There is a song, music, dance tradition in Appalachia
> (not an area with a strong "Pisky" presence),
> that has well documented connections with Scotland.
>
> R Goss
> [richard.n.goss@gte.net]
>
>

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