strathspey Archive: "Social Dancing and Injuries"

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"Social Dancing and Injuries"

Message 2638 · Colleen Dancer333-1862 · 11 Oct 1995 02:09:40 · Top

I often wonder how often injuries are caused by improper warmups or
warmdowns. Not one class I have been to has done a warmdown. Now in
almost any other sport I have ever been involved in which includes
hockey, gymnastics, soccer, softball, aerobics, circuit classes and jazz
ballet the teacher insists on a warmdown. I have taught by at least half
a dozen scottish country dancer teachers and none of them have ever done
a warm down. I Australia in many of the sports I have mentioned you
wouldn't pass your teaching qualifications without including warm ups and
warm downs in the time table. Why should SCD be any different? It is
certainly as stressful on the body as many other sports.

"Social Dancing and Injuries"

Message 2639 · ReelLass · 11 Oct 1995 07:38:29 · Top

Colleen Dancer comments:

<Not one class I have been to has done a warmdown. >

I have been to SCD classes which included cooldown activities, but it does
seem to be hit-or-miss (if the class tends to run over time, it's usually
miss - if refreshments are served, it's usually miss).

We are mostly very good about doing warmups... unless it's a dance party or
ball (we seem to presume that our bodies have different operating rules
depending on how we are attired.)

At least at a formal ball, everyone gets a _bit_ of a loosening during a
Grand March. At regular parties, everyone is expected to come in from the
cold, put on their shoes, and jump right into the liveliest jig the program
deviser could think of for the first dance, complete with double setting
figures.

Hmm...., could anyone recommend some good first dances which might also serve
as a gentle/warmup transition period? Would around-the-room circle dances
lend themselves to this? Would dancers approve? Or, are they too used to
the energizing qualities of a lively jig or reel to tolerate a substitute?

Terry Barron,
San Jose, California

"Social Dancing and Injuries"

Message 2640 · Alex Tweedly · 11 Oct 1995 08:52:41 · Top

> At least at a formal ball, everyone gets a _bit_ of a loosening during a
> Grand March. At regular parties, everyone is expected to come in from the
> cold, put on their shoes, and jump right into the liveliest jig the program
> deviser could think of for the first dance, complete with double setting
> figures.
>
> Hmm...., could anyone recommend some good first dances which might also serve
> as a gentle/warmup transition period? Would around-the-room circle dances
> lend themselves to this? Would dancers approve? Or, are they too used to
> the energizing qualities of a lively jig or reel to tolerate a substitute?
>

In party program planning sessions I've been at (or participated in),
we did think carefully about what should be the first dance. Generally
(I'm told) the musicians prefer to start with a Jig (less notes in a
single jig than a reel or double-jig), so it's easier on their
fingers.

So the ideal first SCD dance is a Jig with little or no Pas de Basque
Local (San Francisco) favourites for first dance are Hooper's Jig and
Machine Without Horses. See below for a brief list of recent first
dances.

Recent dances: # bars of PdB
Asilomar Fri night 94
Hooper's Jig J (none)
Asilomar Ball 94
Berwick Johnnie J (4 bars)

Jan Jessie's Hornpipe J (8 bars in Poussette)
Mar ditto
Apr Duke of Atholl's Reel J (8 bars, 2 at a time).
May Machine w/o Horses J (4 bars, 2 at a time)
Jun Old Nick's Lumber Room J (2 bars)

Asilomar Fri 95
Machine w/o Horses J (4 bars, 2 at a time)
Asilomar Ball 95
Laird of Milton's Daughter J (2 bars)

So they seem to have been chosen with some thought to avoiding too much
setting.

Similar thinking *should* go into the last dance, but I'm not sure it
always does. I think that the very last dance of the evening, when
people are tired and injury prone, should be carefully chosen to
reduce risk; avoid long dances (40- or 48-bar), avoid Hello-Goodbye
setting, Double Triangles, etc., so I wouldn't like to see a program
finish with something like The Express.

-- Alex Tweedly

"Social Dancing and Injuries"

Message 2641 · Anselm Lingnau · 11 Oct 1995 10:07:11 · Top

Alex Tweedly <agt@cisco.com> writes:

> So the ideal first SCD dance is a Jig with little or no Pas de Basque
> Local (San Francisco) favourites for first dance are Hooper's Jig and
> Machine Without Horses.

I've seen The Happy Meeting in the first spot on a couple of programmes.
It's not only a nice and easy dance but is also yelling for this position
by virtue of its own title.

Anselm
--
Anselm Lingnau ......................... lingnau@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de
Things. Take. Time. --- Piet Hein

"Social Dancing and Injuries"

Message 2649 · Greg Hughes · 11 Oct 1995 13:58:01 · Top

Here in Prince Edward Island, under the influence of Gerry Gray, we
have taken to doing a simple Scottish Old Time dance such as the
Veleta, Lomond Waltz, Eva Two Step or the University Waltz. This not
only warms the dancers up gently, but also has the added attraction
of including non-dancing spouses in something not too complex, and we
hope leading them to eventual expansion into regular Scottish Country
Dancers. So far, its still a pious hope!

So the ideal first SCD dance is a Jig with little or no Pas de Basque
Local (San Francisco) favourites for first dance are Hooper's Jig and
Machine Without Horses. See below for a brief list of recent first
dances.

Similar thinking *should* go into the last dance, but I'm not sure it
always does. I think that the very last dance of the evening, when
people are tired and injury prone, should be carefully chosen to
reduce risk; avoid long dances (40- or 48-bar), avoid Hello-Goodbye
setting, Double Triangles, etc., so I wouldn't like to see a program
finish with something like The Express.

We also try to end with a similar Scottish Old Time dance to cool the
dancers down as well.

rghughes@isn.net
R. G. (Greg) Hughes
53 Lewis Point Blvd
Charlottetown, PE C1E 1L8
(902)892-4305

"Social Dancing and Injuries"

Message 2668 · Sandra Rosenau · 11 Oct 1995 19:24:49 · Top

I reserve the last 10 minutes of class to do cooldown exercises. I
frequently suggest stretches before bed and again the next morning for
my class members. I also use the cooldown time to verbally review the
figures, steps, and dances we covered that evening. So you now know
one teacher who does cooldowns. My class starts with warmups
promptly at 7:30 and ends promptly at 9:00, occasionally running over by
5 minutes, specifically so I can do cooldown exercises if I spent too
much time finishing the last dance. This is not the norm for SCD classes,
however.

I think more teachers would do them, but the average social class
finishes not with a bang but a whimper as people start drifting away
homeward until the final few die-hards leave at 10:00. WIth this
arrangement, the teacher has no reason to do cooldown stretches.
There's usually nobody left to do them!

Sandra Rosenau, Dayton, Ohio
sjrosenau@tasc.com

"Social Dancing and Injuries"

Message 2674 · --bakere-- · 12 Oct 1995 06:48:26 · Top

At the class I teach in Ellicott City, Maryland, we warm-up
for about 20 minutes, first with walking and moving exercises
(including the toes-pointed-in exercise that several people
have mentioned) done to cut-time marches; then with a more
extensive stretching, done to waltzes, slow reels, and airs.
The slow-time warm-up sequence is a slightly toned-down
version of the exercises I used to do at the beginning of a
highland or step-dance class or practice. That is, I omit the
stretches that involve lying on the floor because the dancers
are dressed for a social activity, not floor-mopping. I try
to make substitutions that can be done standing to stretch
some of the same muscles.

At the end of class, usually we do some cool-down exercises.
Depending on the how much time the teaching has left us,
the cool-down lasts 5 to 15 minutes. At the very least I
play a final waltz.

For a ball program or dance party (and here I admit that I
have not devised many programs myself; but as a travelling
musician I see more programs in action than the average
dancer) I still think warming up and cooling down are
important. I like the idea of a few old-time dances that
some one suggested. Some of the best programs I have seen
planned a grand march followed by opening waltz to begin,
followed by a quick-time dance with mostly skip change for
the first SCD. Before the interval and rush for refreshments,
a waltz or other couple dance is played. Another waltz or couple
dance opens the next section of dancing; the whole ball ends with
a longish waltz, of course. Waltzes and some of the other
couple dances fulfill the "move, but don't overstrain" aspect
of warming up and are highly suitable to be done in elegant
clothing. Depending entirely on the tastes of the local crowd,
some of the couple dances I have seen/danced/played on
these occasions have included Canadian barn dance, hambo,
Norwegian polka, folk-dance style schottische, zwiefachers,
swing, ragtime, foxtrot, tango, snoa, and Gay Gordons, not to
mention a variety of styles of waltzing.

Such couple dances ought to be taught on occasion at SCD
classes so that people will know them and be able to do
them at parties and balls. Of course the couple dances are
not the same as a good series of warm-up and cool-down
exercises, but they are much better than nothing.

Elke Baker

"Social Dancing and Injuries"

Message 2673 · Courtney Cartwright · 12 Oct 1995 04:28:35 · Top

At 09:46 AM 10/11/95 -0500, Colleen 02 <Dancer> 333-1862"
<DANCER.COLLEEN@a2.abc.net.au> wrote:
>Not one class I have been to has done a warmdown. I have taught by at least
>half a dozen scottish country dancer teachers and none of them have ever done
>a warm down.

If my class is anything to go by, alot of the elderly dancers and "morning
people" leave well before the actual end of the class. My usual warm down is
to slow down the music on the recorder for each of the last 2 dances (assuming
quick time, of course). :) We then always end with a waltz or two for those
who are interested. A full blown warm down IS a good idea, but I'm not sure
what the best way to add it is, logistically.

Any Ideas????

Courtney Cartwright
Tucson, Arizona
ccartwri@primenet.com

"Social Dancing and Injuries"

Message 2682 · Lynn Messing · 12 Oct 1995 18:27:31 · Top

Elke Baker suggested using couple dances as a warmup and cool-down
activity at balls. In theory, this is a wonderful idea; in practice,
though, there is at least one problem. There are far more women than
men dancing here (Delaware Valley Branch), and I get the distinct
impression that this is not at all unusual. With true SCD dances here,
women dance with women all the time, and think nothing of it. But
the couple dances (and particularly the waltzes) are almost exclusively
co-ed. Not only that, they tend to be danced almost exclusively with
spouses or steady dates. That means that folks who don't currently have a
significant other will not be dancing the couple dances. If the couple
dances were to be done more frequently, could we change the attitudes
and customs involved, so that people who have SO's would continue to
dance with them, but those that don't could dance with each other,
regardless of gender? This would not only increase the number of people
participating in such warmup/cooldown exercises, but would also boost
morale.

This is not an insignificant complaint. I have spoken with one individual
who stopped dancing (polka, not SCD, but the principle is the same) because
of this problem. The polkas she attended were, like SCD, social dances where
one changed partners with each new dance. But they also had a few "SOs
only" dances, which she resented...She felt that they rubbed in
her face the fact that she was single and without a boyfriend. While
I consider the strength of her emotions to be extreme, and her ceasing
dancing to be an over-reaction, I certainly empathize with her feelings.
On a much smaller scale, I have felt the same way when the waltz music
comes on at a SCD function. By all means include waltzes in balls, and
certainly have SOs dance together, but also create an atmosphere where all
feel comfortable dancing, even the currently unattached, and even two people
of the same gender!

I think Elke's suggestion of including waltzes in SCD classes, if coupled
with an appropriate attitude by the instructor, would go a long way toward
creating such an atmosphere.

Cheers, Lynn Messing
messing@asel.udel.edu
http://www.asel.udel.edu/~messing/home.html

"Social Dancing and Injuries"

Message 2685 · Mcgarrity · 12 Oct 1995 19:25:32 · Top

About using couple dances as warm-ups: some couple dances tend to use both
sides of the body about equally, but I've always found that waltzing leaves
me with
one leg tired and the other not. I'm assuming that this has to do with the
direction
of turn?, and that many waltz partners I've had spend most (or all) of the
waltz
turning in the same direction. This leaves me with one leg downright tired
and one
leg barely warm...hence my own feeling that the waltz isn't very desirable as
a
warm-up dance.
Any other thoughts on this?
Kim McGarrity
Palo Alto, CA
mcgarrity@aol.com

"Social Dancing and Injuries"

Message 2692 · Gerry Gray · 13 Oct 1995 02:19:33 · Top

Kim McGarrity wrote;

>I've always found that waltzing leaves me with one leg tired and the other
not. >I'm assuming that this has to do with the direction of turn?, and that
many >waltz partners I've had spend most (or all) of the waltz turning in
the same >direction.

You are describing the reason why I, a person who has encouraged and taught
Old Time dancing for a number of years as a compliment for Scottish Country
Dancing, usually chooses to leave the floor rather than take up the waltz
hold whenever a waltz or polka begins at a SCD function.

Would any of us classify doing strathspey travelling for 512 bars in a
straight line as doing a dance? How about 80 bars of setting while turning?
Of course not. In SCD we use various steps and formations that put together
creates a dance -- and these varied movements are carefully crafted to fit
the music, whether it be 32, 40 or 48 bars... We are 'Sequence Dancers'.

Old Time and Sequence Dancing fulfills that respect for the music we have
learned through SCD. These dances also provide us with the variety of steps
and movement that are also needed to relieve mental tedium and 'give our
legs an even break'!

While I would dearly love to see more waltzes, polkas and two-steps
intermingled within our SCD programs (and maybe even a Quadrilles or Lancer
or two), I doubt if I personally would partake of the opportunity unless it
were a set dance like the Veleta, the Ansdella, the Lomond, the Pride of
Erin, the Chrysanthemum, the University, the Latchford Schottische and the
Esperano Barn Dance...

- Gerry
-----------------------------------------------------------
Gerry Gray
90 Kinlock Road
Stratford, PE
Canada C1B 1C6
gegray@peinet.pe.ca
-----------------------------------------------------------

"Social Dancing and Injuries"

Message 2695 · Mmthayer · 13 Oct 1995 08:33:51 · Top

Norah Link writes...

I think cooldowns are gradually catching on, as warm-ups have. The big
problem
remains, of course, socials and balls - when we're all dressed up in our
fancy
duds and no one is standing there saying "and now let's stretch out those
tired
muscles before we go home".
___________________________________________________________

I bet if some innovative person got a small group up after a ball and started
doing
warm downs then more would join in. Likewise for warm ups. It might be
worth
an experiment.

Marieke Thayer
mmthayer@aol.com

"Social Dancing and Injuries"

Message 2702 · Susan Worland · 13 Oct 1995 16:34:41 · Top

Some scattered thoughts on gender, waltzes, polkas, etc.

First of all, as a person who generally attends dance events without a (an?)
SO, I don't mind a "last waltz" being for couples only. Occasionally I get
a partner -- there are single men, and there are coupled men who sometimes
dance with people other than their SO for whatever reason.

I do find it unpleasant at a Ball, though, that if you don't have a date,
you're likely not to do the Grand March, which means you're really unlikely
to do the waltz, which also means you're probably not going to do the first
dance. Yes, women can do the Grand March together, threesomes sometimes go
out for a Grand March, but they don't usually go on to waltz together! Once
I was at a Ball that had a very complicated Grand March that turned inside
out at the end. A man commented after he'd had no idea that there were so
many pairs of women and other "odd" groupings back at the tail end of a
grand march. No, he wouldn't have known -- he was a public figure and
always was at the front with a wife or wife equivalent!

As for polka dances I've been to, most of the people there are usually
couples middle aged or older, married to each other, and have been dancing
together since they were teenagers. It's definitely a couple scene.
However, they're usually gracious enough to ask a newcomer to dance, and
I've always danced enough to be hot sweaty and exhausted at the end! What
more can you ask?

Finally, given this gender imbalance (and unfortunately I find it in
virtually all aspects of my life!) I wonder, why don't single men figure out
that dancing would be a *great* place to meet new women??? You'd think the
word would get out.
===================================================================
Susan Worland Online Computer Market, Inc.
susan@ocm.com 30 Turnpike Road, Southborough Mass.
http://www.ocm.com (508) 480-0577
A premier provider of products and services for World Wide Web
based advertising, marketing, electronic commerce, electronic
communities and customer support.

===================================================================

"Social Dancing and Injuries"

Message 2704 · Seth Major · 13 Oct 1995 20:13:29 · Top

Susan Worland wrote:

> ...
> I wonder, why don't single men figure out
> that dancing would be a *great* place to meet new women??? You'd think the
> word would get out.

CAUTION: It has.

Especially in small groups, single men more interested in "new
women" than dance can create a nasty environment.

Happy dancing ! :-)
Seth Major
seth@phys.psu.edu

"Social Dancing and Injuries"

Message 2705 · Susan Worland · 13 Oct 1995 20:38:56 · Top

>Susan Worland wrote:
>
>> ...
>> I wonder, why don't single men figure out
>> that dancing would be a *great* place to meet new women??? You'd think the
>> word would get out.
>
>CAUTION: It has.
>
>Especially in small groups, single men more interested in "new
>women" than dance can create a nasty environment.
>
>Happy dancing ! :-)
>Seth Major
>seth@phys.psu.edu
>
Nasty to you? Nasty to the women? I can imagine this could truly be the
case, but I do have to wonder whether the presence of new men seems nastier
to an already-present man than to the probably many more already-present
women! ;-)

But I also wonder, why did three string quartets I played in last year all
have three women and one man? Why is my class to learn to be a volunteer at
the Arboretum about 90% women? Why is my aerobics class 100% women? (Just
kidding, I know the answer to that one!) Why is the orchestra I play in
about 70% women? Why, when I volunteered serving meals to the homeless, was
it about 80% women? Why, the last two times I went international folk
dancing, did I not once, in the two times combined, get a partner for even
so much as one couple dance? Maybe I should take up telescope building as a
hobby or something!
>
===================================================================
Susan Worland Online Computer Market, Inc.
susan@ocm.com 30 Turnpike Road, Southborough Mass.
http://www.ocm.com (508) 480-0577
A premier provider of products and services for World Wide Web
based advertising, marketing, electronic commerce, electronic
communities and customer support.

===================================================================

"Social Dancing and Injuries"

Message 2706 · Susan Worland · 13 Oct 1995 20:41:30 · Top

Oh, did I forget birdwatching? 80% women.
===================================================================
Susan Worland Online Computer Market, Inc.
susan@ocm.com 30 Turnpike Road, Southborough Mass.
http://www.ocm.com (508) 480-0577
A premier provider of products and services for World Wide Web
based advertising, marketing, electronic commerce, electronic
communities and customer support.

===================================================================

"Social Dancing and Injuries"

Message 2710 · Courtney Cartwright · 14 Oct 1995 02:29:36 · Top

At 01:38 AM 10/11/95 -0400, Terry Barron wrote:
>Hmm...., could anyone recommend some good first dances which might also serve
>as a gentle/warmup transition period? Would around-the-room circle dances
>lend themselves to this? Would dancers approve? Or, are they too used to
>the energizing qualities of a lively jig or reel to tolerate a substitute?
>

I feel that around the room dances are the worst for warmups, simply because
everybody's active for every repetition of the dance -- assuming you mean dances
where one couple/trio faces another couple/trio, ala Ciracssian Circle or
Dashing White Sergeants. Quite often these round the room dances are done
with 6 to 8 repetitions -- far too much for a first dance with no rest between
reps.

I like to start with walking dances like English Country Dances, or running
steps or waltz steps, anything that's sociable and yet not too strenuous for the
first dance.

Courtney Cartwright
Tucson, Arizona
ccartwri@primenet.com

"Social Dancing and Injuries"

Message 2724 · king maghi · 15 Oct 1995 02:19:37 · Top

Face it Susan, women are more creative, more artistic, more inventive,
more sociable: at least on the evidence available.

Are you really sure that you want to catch a man?

I'll leave it to y'all to try to figure out how serious I really am.

Maghi

Asking for any Highland Dancing Listserves...

Message 2725 · Raymond A. Brown · 15 Oct 1995 03:36:18 · Top


I just saw someone in the Usenet newsgroup alt.scot.clans (or
something like that) that was asking for any info on any Highland groups.
I was also curious if there was a Highland Listserve, similar to this one.

I'll watch for a reply here in the normal manner.

By the way, I am still trying to get a SCD dance group started /
organized here in southwest Missouri USA. <g>

_Ray_

Asking for any Highland Dancing Listserves...

Message 2737 · Faith Eggleston · 16 Oct 1995 15:05:17 · Top

I was reading Ray's message. I would also be interested in finding out
more about these Highland dancing listserves.

> I just saw someone in the Usenet newsgroup alt.scot.clans (or
>something like that) that was asking for any info on any Highland
>groups. I was also curious if there was a Highland Listserve, similar to
>this one.

> I'll watch for a reply here in the normal manner.

> By the way, I am still trying to get a SCD dance group started /
>organized here in southwest Missouri USA. <g>

> _Ray_

--
>"Raymond A. Brown" <rbrown@gxl.woodtech.com>

"Social Dancing and Injuries"

Message 2751 · Colleen Dancer333-1862 · 17 Oct 1995 06:35:40 · Top

I agree with Keith, learning a dance does not equate to a warm up. A
warm up usually involves gently stretching and rotating the muscles and
joints. Note as I am not a physiotherapist this is not a technical
explanation. The times I have had most trouble is when we started
dancing or learning a dance without a warmup. When thinking about
waltzes please remember there are plenty of us young uns that have never
waltzed.

While I believe that at a dance, it is the dancers responsibility. At a
class I believe the responsibility is with the teacher. In fact, sorry
to be controversial, but I believe that no teacher is doing their job
properly unless they do a warmup and a cooldown. I believe RSCDS should
have it incorporated into their teachers certificates. As I said before,
although no-one commented, that every other teachers certificate
equivalent for other sports that I know of requires warmups and
cooldowns. Certainly from the emails lately, many people agree that SCD
is stressful so why should we assume that we are different to other
sports? In fact given the larger range of ages involved in the sport
than most it would seem even more necessary.

Colleen Dancer
dancer.colleen@a2.abc.net.au

"Social Dancing and Injuries"

Message 2762 · Keith Grant · 17 Oct 1995 21:42:16 · Top

As an addendum to what I posted before, on the physiology and motivations
for stretching: there is a comprehensive FAQ (frequently asked question)
guide to stretching written by Brad Appleton. I've included the information
needed to access the files by FTP or via a WWW browser below. The FAQ can be
freely distributed and copied as long as it is done verbatim, keep the credits
etc. intact.

As to the importance of cooldowns, as emphasized by Colleen Dancer:

Vigorous exercise generates metabolic waste products, such as lactic acid.
More gentle movements following vigorous exercise provides a form of self-
massage to worked muscles. This helps to move lactic acid out of the
tissue, reducing later soreness, and also helps tired, contracted, muscles
relax. Such relaxation of contracted muscles in needed for proper
reoxygenation to occur -- it's much harder for fresh blood at the capilliary
level to enter contracted tissue than relaxed tissue. This is also one of
the reasons that chronically bad posture, resulting in constant muscle
loading, leads to tissue dysfunction and pain.

------------------------

Version: 1.15, Last Modified 94/06/17 Copyright (C) 1993, 1994 by Bradford D.
Appleton

Permission is granted to make and distribute verbatim copies of this document
provided the copyright notice and this permission notice are preserved on all
copies.

This document is available in ascii, texinfo, postscript, dvi, and html formats
via anonymous ftp from the host `cs.huji.ac.il'. Look under the directory
`/pub/doc/faq/rec/martial.arts'. The file name matches the wildcard pattern
`stretching.*'. The file suffix indicates the format.

For WWW users, the URL is:
http://archie.ac.il/papers/rma/stretching_toc.html.

Introduction
Physiology of Stretching
Flexibility
Types of Stretching
How to Stretch
References on Stretching
Working Toward the Splits
Normal Ranges of Joint Motion
Index
------------------------------

+-------------------------+-----------------------------------------------+
I I Common sense and a sense of humor are the I
I Keith Eric Grant I same thing, moving at different speeds. A I
I keg@strathspey.llnl.gov I sense of humor is just common sense, dancing. I
I I (or perhaps dancing is just common sense) I
+-------------------------+-----------------------------------------------+
I For certain it is, that any ideas expressed above are of my own humble I
I opinion and bear nary a relation to the policies or positions of LLNL I
I or of any agency or contractor of the U.S. Government. I
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------+

"Social Dancing and Injuries"

Message 2773 · king maghi · 18 Oct 1995 14:38:45 · Top

Thanks to Brad Appleton for a very useful book!

Maghi

Maghi King | Internet: king@divsun.unige.ch
ISSCO, University of Geneva | X400: S=king; OU=divsun;O=unige;
54 route des Acacias | PRMD=switch;ADMD=arcom;C=ch
CH-1227 GENEVA (Switzerland) | UUCP: mcvax!cui!divsun.unige.ch!king
Tel: +41/22/705 71 14 | FAX: +41/22/300 10 86

"Social Dancing and Injuries"

Message 2808 · Jim & Marilyn Healy · 20 Oct 1995 01:17:56 · Top

On Tue, 17 Oct 1995 Keith Grant wrote:

> Vigorous exercise generates metabolic waste products, such as lactic
> acid. More gentle movements following vigorous exercise provides a
> form of self-massage to worked muscles. This helps to move lactic acid
> out of the tissue, reducing later soreness, and also helps tired,
> contracted, muscles relax. Such relaxation of contracted muscles in
> needed for proper reoxygenation to occur --

This reminded me of the end of one session at a Whitsun weekend in Delft
when Bill Zobel was stressing the importance of warmdowns and
explaining the physiology above. He also suggested that massage and
warm baths further assisted in this process. At this point the less than
young lady standing beside us turned to me and said "I believe sex is very
good as well." Lost for words doesnt begin to describe me but perhaps a
physiologist out there could tell me if she was correct.

Jim Healy
Perth, Scotland

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