strathspey Archive: Music was Dress Standards

Previous thread: Good Manners was Dress Standards=snobbery
Next thread: Asilomar Romantic

Music was Dress Standards

Message 24118 · Thomas G. Mungall, III · 15 Dec 2000 23:08:03 · Top

I wonder how many groups out there use music other than the typical SDC
dance music for SCD? Like say dancing to Capercallie tunes or Battlefield
Band, etc?

Tom Mungall
----- Original Message -----
From: <RuddBaron@aol.com>
> --- So...perhaps someone could devise a dance that has figures indicating
> properly attired persons pass through, but those that aren't are turned
away,
> and then those that do the turning away are chastised by certain other
> dancers. That really sounds more like modern dance, though...with a New
Age
> accompaniment. :)

Music

Message 24121 · Lara D. Friedman~Shedlov · 15 Dec 2000 23:23:46 · Top

On Fri, 15 Dec 2000, Thomas G. Mungall, III wrote:

> I wonder how many groups out there use music other than the typical SDC
> dance music for SCD? Like say dancing to Capercallie tunes or Battlefield
> Band, etc?
>
Haven't seen any SCD groups do this, but I've definitely seen it in
highland dance classes. Many teachers use pop music (or pop-influenced
Celtic music) as a change of pace during practices or for special
choreographies. Most amusing example I heard was using "I Get Knocked
Down" by Chumbawumba as practice music for pas de basques -- works great
for 2-beat highland pdbs.

Sounds silly but using music that is more familiar to the dancers may
get them to listen to it more effectively, which is important when you are
trying to stress the rhythm of a particular movement you are
teaching. Probably all of us have been taught to use tunes with a
particular rhythm for teaching specific movements (e.g. "Humber
Jumber" for slip step) but has anyone ever used non-Scottish/Celtic music
for this purpose? Judicious use of unexpected music can really keep the
class interested and on their toes (pun intended), from my observations.

When I was a beginner, I had a lot of trouble learning the strathspey
travelling step, for some reason (got the pdb right away,
strangely). Anyway, I remember practicing at home to a Mozart piano
concerto (I think it's the one in E-flat -- it's on the soundtrack to
Amadeus). It seemed to work perfectly for the step.

--Lara

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Lara Friedman~Shedlov "Thwart not the librarian!"
ldfs@bigfoot.com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Music was Dress Standards

Message 24122 · John K. Andrews · 15 Dec 2000 23:29:02 · Top

Harry Ways has devised a couple of dances to non-traditional music,
Crockets Victory Garden and the Comanche Reel.

Jay Andrews
Alexandria, VA

At 03:08 PM 12/15/2000 -0600, you wrote:
>I wonder how many groups out there use music other than the typical SDC
>dance music for SCD? Like say dancing to Capercallie tunes or Battlefield
>Band, etc?
>
>Tom Mungall

Music was Dress Standards

Message 24124 · RuddBaron · 16 Dec 2000 00:16:23 · Top

In a message dated 12/15/2000 3:08:29 PM Central Standard Time,
atheling@home.com writes:

<< I wonder how many groups out there use music other than the typical SDC
dance music for SCD? Like say dancing to Capercallie tunes or Battlefield
Band, etc? >>

--- I've heard bands with all sorts of instruments that aren't necessarily
Scottish. I don't believe the squeeze box is a Scottish instrument,
either...but it's somewhat reedy sound makes it somewhat reminiscent of a
Uillean pipe sound. Perhaps we should try dancing to Shostakovich. :)

Music was Dress Standards

Message 24135 · S.M. Gent · 16 Dec 2000 13:43:00 · Top

We have done various dems to "other" music. The one I was in wasn't
strictly a SCD - it had quite a lot of ECD figures in it and was danced
to a mixture of ordinary SCD tunes and the Lumberjack Song from Monty
Python as the dance was called Pinig for the Fjords.

Dunedin also did a dem for the Newcastle festival a couple of years ago
which used the Black and White Rag, When I'm Sixty-Four and something
else which I can't remember. I seem to remember it going down quite
well!

I also know quite a lot of bands around here who will slip in the odd
Christmassy tune (or complete sets) at this time of year.

Also for the dance Corstorphine Fair, some local bands will do a set of
tunes related to animals (eg Nellie the Elephant, Noah's Ark etc.) as
Costorphine Hill is where Edinburgh Zoo is situated. And for Flying
Scotsman the Runaway Train works quite well.

We also use more popular music for highland. If the littlies (ie
3-10yrs old) are looking tired and not doing too well the Smurfs or the
Singing Kettle usually helps no end.

Se=F3naid

Music was Dress Standards

Message 24138 · SallenNic · 16 Dec 2000 17:28:33 · Top

In a message dated 15/12/00 10:16:56 pm, RuddBaron@aol.com writes:

>I've heard bands with all sorts of instruments that aren't necessarily
>
>Scottish. I don't believe the squeeze box is a Scottish instrument,
>either
If by "squeezebox" you mean Accordion, then you'd go a long way in Scotland
to find a SDB without one!
Nicolas B., Lanark,
Scotland.

Music was Dress Standards

Message 24141 · RuddBaron · 16 Dec 2000 17:56:21 · Top

In a message dated 12/16/2000 9:29:09 AM Central Standard Time,
SallenNic@aol.com writes:

<< If by "squeezebox" you mean Accordion, then you'd go a long way in
Scotland
to find a SDB without one! >>

--- Oh I know that...but I don't believe it was originally Scottish. Where it
comes from, I don't know. Is it Germanic? I know the concertina is French...

Music was Dress Standards

Message 24143 · Etienne Ozorak · 16 Dec 2000 19:26:29 · Top

Hello,

The patent for the what we call an accordion was placed in Vienna in
1829, though it is (or was) a common folk instrument used in a
considerable number of cultures (same can be made for the bagpipes).
However, the accordion is derived from the portable organum, which was
used in church organs hundreds of years before. Though I may feel old, I
can't say that I was there to witness all this.

Etienne Ozorak

On Sat, 16 Dec 2000 RuddBaron@aol.com wrote:

> In a message dated 12/16/2000 9:29:09 AM Central Standard Time,
> SallenNic@aol.com writes:
>
> << If by "squeezebox" you mean Accordion, then you'd go a long way in
> Scotland
> to find a SDB without one! >>
>
> --- Oh I know that...but I don't believe it was originally Scottish. Where it
> comes from, I don't know. Is it Germanic? I know the concertina is French...
>
>

Music was Dress Standards

Message 24144 · Mike Briggs · 16 Dec 2000 19:39:39 · Top

And I don't believe the fiddle, flute or piano was "originally
Scottish", nor were the pipes exclusively "originally Scottish". What
difference does an instrument's origin make unless the idea is to gut
Scottish dance bands of all instruments except those with certified
Scottish pedigrees?

Mike
--
---------------------------------------------
Norma Briggs Voice: 608 835 0914
Michael J. Briggs Fax: 608 835 0924
BRIGGS LAW OFFICE
1519 Storytown Rd Oregon WI 53575-2521 USA
---------------------------------------------
HTTP://BRIGGSLAW.HOMESTEAD.COM
---------------------------------------------

Music was Dress Standards

Message 24177 · ron.mackey · 18 Dec 2000 00:01:48 · Top

> Hello,
>
> The patent for the what we call an accordion was placed in Vienna in
> 1829, though it is (or was) a common folk instrument used in a
> considerable number of cultures (same can be made for the bagpipes).
> However, the accordion is derived from the portable organum, which was
> used in church organs hundreds of years before. Though I may feel old, I
> can't say that I was there to witness all this.
>
> Etienne Ozorak
>

nice to see a comment from you Etienne. :)
Cheers, Ron :)

< 0 Ron Mackey,(Purveyor of Pat's Party Pieces)
'O> Mottingham,
/#\ London. UK.
l>
Ron.Mackey@btinternet.com

Music was Dress Standards

Message 24123 · Anselm Lingnau · 15 Dec 2000 23:53:03 · Top

Tom Mungall <atheling@home.com> wrote:

> I wonder how many groups out there use music other than the typical SDC
> dance music for SCD? Like say dancing to Capercallie tunes or Battlefield
> Band, etc?

The problem with that is that the recorded tunes rarely come with a
chord to get started and finished, and the middle bit usually isn't
bar-counted and tempo-controlled the way country dancers like it.

Personally I do use folk band music for warm-ups and cool-downs every
so often, but I haven't yet found recorded tracks suitable for
bona-fide dancing. Of course that doesn't mean one could not take the
recorded music and devise a dance to fit. I'm told this is a fairly
popular pastime with the Highland dance crowd, where tempos and steps
are more flexible and varied.

Anselm
--
Anselm Lingnau ......................... lingnau@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de
French food is pretty tasty, except for the snails, which I do not believe the
French actually eat. -- Dave Barry, *Bad airline food*

Music was Dress Standards

Message 24145 · Steve Wyrick · 16 Dec 2000 20:41:41 · Top

Thomas G. Mungall, III wrote:

> I wonder how many groups out there use music other than the typical SDC
> dance music for SCD? Like say dancing to Capercallie tunes or Battlefield
> Band, etc?

Well not for SCD, but our performance group does do some step dancing to
modern music. Our teacher, Claudette Sigg, devised Winter Moon Brooch to
Alasdair Fraser's Banks of Spey/Brenda Stubbert's set several years ago and
we found audiences responded more to that dance than to any of the other
dances, with "traditional" music. Since then members have devised dances
set to music by Brother, Dougie MacLean, Tabache, and others. We also
perform some older dances set to modern music, such as Blue Bonnets to The
Wicked Tinkers' Hugh Ross Set, and My Love, She's but a Lassie Yet set to
Phil Cunningham's Hogties Reel. As Anselm pointed out, it's difficult to
find music that fits properly, so we usually end up making minor
modifications to the dance, or edits to the music. It's interesting to see
how the character of a dance changes depending on the music it's done to!
This year our performance theme has been Scots in California, and we have
been performing a sort of history of Scottish dancing, beginning with the
gold rush era, through the Victorian period, and ending with a "New
Millenium" set performed to modern music. The performances have been
received well, and it's a lot of fun to do! -Steve
--
Steve Wyrick <sjwyrick@earthlink.net> -- Concord, CA

Music was Dress Standards

Message 24147 · Priscilla M. Burrage · 16 Dec 2000 20:57:08 · Top

> It's interesting to see
> how the character of a dance changes depending on the music it's done to!

At a Montreal Ball years ago, I was horrified to see a mediocre (I'm being
polite) dance in the middle of the program just at the point when the
dancers should be getting a high. I was asked to dance and therefore did
the dance. Imagine my surprise and delight when the band played an
arrangement of Stephen Foster tunes. It was a real high!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Priscilla Burrage Vermont US
(pburrage@zoo.uvm.edu)

Music was Dress Standards

Message 24148 · RuddBaron · 16 Dec 2000 23:59:25 · Top

In a message dated 12/16/2000 11:40:08 AM Central Standard Time,
brigglaw@execpc.com writes:

<< And I don't believe the fiddle, flute or piano was "originally
Scottish", nor were the pipes exclusively "originally Scottish". What
difference does an instrument's origin make unless the idea is to gut
Scottish dance bands of all instruments except those with certified
Scottish pedigrees? >>

--- The pipes and fiddles have been there a lot longer than accordians. That
doesn't mean one shouldn't have an accordian for SCD music...

Music was Dress Standards

Message 24149 · SMiskoe · 17 Dec 2000 00:43:37 · Top

Regarding 'Scottish' instruments:
When I first began playing SCD there was a flutist who wanted to be included.
The reaction of the dancers, who were very influenced by Jimmy Shand
arrangements, was Never heard of a flute, Can't possibly include a flute. I
was thrilled to find references to flutes in Niel Gow's music. It all
depends on you prospective at the moment.
Cheers,
Sylvia Miskoe, Concord, NH USA

Music was Dress Standards

Message 24150 · SMiskoe · 17 Dec 2000 00:43:54 · Top

No matter how dull, poorly constructed, uninteresting, etc. a dance is, a
good musician and good arrangement will make it stellar. The down side is
that the next time the dance is done and different players/arrangements are
used the dancers will be unhappy.
Cheers,
Sylvia Miskoe, Concord, NH USA

Music was Dress Standards

Message 24155 · Benjamin Stein · 17 Dec 2000 02:01:27 · Top

RuddBaron@aol.com wrote:

> In a message dated 12/16/2000 11:40:08 AM Central Standard Time,
> brigglaw@execpc.com writes:
>
> << And I don't believe the fiddle, flute or piano was "originally
> Scottish", nor were the pipes exclusively "originally Scottish". What
> difference does an instrument's origin make unless the idea is to gut
> Scottish dance bands of all instruments except those with certified
> Scottish pedigrees? >>

I remember some yars ago when a Canadian Scottish Fiddler (who shall be
nameless) objected to the introduction of a Keyboard into a SCD Band as not
being "traditional" and Stan Hamilton reminded him that the Accordian wasn't
"traditional" 150 years earlier.

Ben stein
dancrs@globalnetisp.net

Music was Dress Standards

Message 24156 · Thomas G. Mungall, III · 17 Dec 2000 02:53:07 · Top

Interesting thread...I suppose instrumentation could effect the sound and
ethnic flavour of a Scottish Country dance band...add a tuba, clarinet &
rotary valve trumpet and you have a genuine "Trip to Bavaria"! ;-)

If one were to add a trombone, cornet and clairnet and one could dance to
"South Rampart Street Parade"!

Add uuliean pipes, bodran and penny whistle and you have the "Chieftains".

Aye!

Tom Mungall
----- Original Message -----
From: "Benjamin Stein" <dancers@globalnetisp.net>
> I remember some yars ago when a Canadian Scottish Fiddler (who shall be
> nameless) objected to the introduction of a Keyboard into a SCD Band as
not
> being "traditional" and Stan Hamilton reminded him that the Accordian
wasn't
> "traditional" 150 years earlier.

Music was Dress Standards

Message 24157 · RuddBaron · 17 Dec 2000 03:40:25 · Top

Flutes have been around in various types of music, including Scottish, for a loooooong time. Flute Choirs are also very popular in Ireland.

s/RBJ

In a message dated Sat, 16 Dec 2000 5:44:02 PM Eastern Standard Time, SMiskoe@aol.com writes:

<< Regarding 'Scottish' instruments:
When I first began playing SCD there was a flutist who wanted to be included.
The reaction of the dancers, who were very influenced by Jimmy Shand
arrangements, was Never heard of a flute, Can't possibly include a flute. I
was thrilled to find references to flutes in Niel Gow's music. It all
depends on you prospective at the moment.
Cheers,
Sylvia Miskoe, Concord, NH USA

--
SMiskoe@aol.com

>>

Music was Dress Standards

Message 24158 · RuddBaron · 17 Dec 2000 03:44:00 · Top

Without a piano and/or accordian, one needs something to provide the bass and preferably also a chord structure. Perhaps a flute quartet, i.e., a flute, a violin, a viola, and a cello, would suffice. But...the viola and cello aren't "Scottish," so what did the Scots use for bass in the distant past? Percussion is the only thing that comes to mind.

In a message dated Sat, 16 Dec 2000 7:01:47 PM Eastern Standard Time, Benjamin Stein <dancers@globalnetisp.net> writes:

<<

RuddBaron@aol.com wrote:

> In a message dated 12/16/2000 11:40:08 AM Central Standard Time,
> brigglaw@execpc.com writes:
>
> << And I don't believe the fiddle, flute or piano was "originally
> Scottish", nor were the pipes exclusively "originally Scottish". What
> difference does an instrument's origin make unless the idea is to gut
> Scottish dance bands of all instruments except those with certified
> Scottish pedigrees? >>

I remember some yars ago when a Canadian Scottish Fiddler (who shall be
nameless) objected to the introduction of a Keyboard into a SCD Band as not
being "traditional" and Stan Hamilton reminded him that the Accordian wasn't
"traditional" 150 years earlier.

Ben stein
dancrs@globalnetisp.net

>>

Music was Dress Standards

Message 24159 · RuddBaron · 17 Dec 2000 03:45:52 · Top

Now there's an interesting idea. I actually have often found the accordian in SCD to sound more like what I heard in Bavaria. :) As for the clarinet...if one has a good clarinetist capable of doing a portamento, we could dance Rhapsody in Plaid. :)

s/RBJ

In a message dated Sat, 16 Dec 2000 7:53:25 PM Eastern Standard Time, "Thomas G. Mungall, III" <atheling@home.com> writes:

<< Interesting thread...I suppose instrumentation could effect the sound and
ethnic flavour of a Scottish Country dance band...add a tuba, clarinet &
rotary valve trumpet and you have a genuine "Trip to Bavaria"! ;-)

If one were to add a trombone, cornet and clairnet and one could dance to
"South Rampart Street Parade"!

Add uuliean pipes, bodran and penny whistle and you have the "Chieftains".

Aye!

Tom Mungall
----- Original Message -----
From: "Benjamin Stein" <dancers@globalnetisp.net>
> I remember some yars ago when a Canadian Scottish Fiddler (who shall be
> nameless) objected to the introduction of a Keyboard into a SCD Band as
not
> being "traditional" and Stan Hamilton reminded him that the Accordian
wasn't
> "traditional" 150 years earlier.

--
"Thomas G. Mungall, III" <atheling@home.com>

>>

Music was Dress Standards

Message 24161 · SallenNic · 17 Dec 2000 13:21:23 · Top

In a message dated 16/12/00 3:56:47 pm, RuddBaron@aol.com writes:

>Oh I know that...but I don't believe it was originally Scottish. Where
>it
>comes from, I don't know. Is it Germanic? I know the concertina is French...

No, sorry, the Concertina was not a French invention:-) It was invented by an
Englishman, Charles Wheatstone (of Wheatstone's Bridge scientific fame), in
something like 1824. He took up with a French gentleman by the name of
Lachenal, who was a cabinetmaker, purely because he needed someone to case
the works. Lachenal then went on to make Concertinas himself after splitting
from Wheatstone, but the Inventor was Wheatstone.
Nicolas B., Lanark,
Scotland.

Music was Dress Standards

Message 24165 · RuddBaron · 17 Dec 2000 17:13:54 · Top

In a message dated 12/17/2000 5:21:38 AM Central Standard Time,
SallenNic@aol.com writes:

<< No, sorry, the Concertina was not a French invention:-) It was invented by
an
Englishman, Charles Wheatstone (of Wheatstone's Bridge scientific fame), in
something like 1824. He took up with a French gentleman by the name of
Lachenal, who was a cabinetmaker, purely because he needed someone to case
the works. Lachenal then went on to make Concertinas himself after splitting
from Wheatstone, but the Inventor was Wheatstone. >>

--- Well I must stand corrected. It's kind of like the English Horn not being
English...

Music was Dress Standards

Message 24169 · Thomas G. Mungall, III · 17 Dec 2000 19:31:09 · Top

Nor is the French Horn French! ;-)

Tom Mungall
----- Original Message -----
From: <RuddBaron@aol.com>
> --- Well I must stand corrected. It's kind of like the English Horn not
being
> English...

Music was Dress Standards

Message 24171 · RuddBaron · 17 Dec 2000 21:32:22 · Top

In a message dated 12/17/2000 11:31:25 AM Central Standard Time,
atheling@home.com writes:

<< Nor is the French Horn French! ;-) >>

--- True. I'm not sure of the origins of the French horn, but judging from
its tone and construction, I would venture an educated deduction that it
comes from a straight hunting horn which then was curved, much like the
straight tube of an heraldic trumpet was bent around to form a bugle, and
then a trumpet. As for the origins of the bagpipes, they basically took a
cat, put it in a bag for transport, and then hooked up some pipes to it for
breathing. The carrier could periodically blow into one of the tubes to put
more air into the bag, and they soon noticed the sounds that were produced,
and the bagpipes were soon developed. Now, if someone wanted to play a joke,
they could remove the musician's cat from the bag, and when the musician
tried to play, he would get quite a surprise and exclaim "Someone has let the
cat out of the bag!" :)

Music was Dress Standards

Message 24178 · ron.mackey · 18 Dec 2000 00:01:50 · Top

> I wonder how many groups out there use music other than the typical SDC
> dance music for SCD? Like say dancing to Capercallie tunes or Battlefield
> Band, etc?
>
> Tom Mungall

Have you come across the Ian Cruickshanks two versions of The
Fisherman's Reel ? He did one to tunes from Gilbert and Sullivan
and it was so popular he has done a second version using different
tunes.
It's quite and experience doing reels of three singing 'Oh, I am a
judge and a good judge too .............' :)))
Great fun.

Cheers, Ron :)

< 0 Ron Mackey,(Purveyor of Pat's Party Pieces)
'O> Mottingham,
/#\ London. UK.
l>
Ron.Mackey@btinternet.com

Music was Dress Standards

Message 24180 · Ian Thorn · 18 Dec 2000 01:41:25 · Top

That may go some way to explaining why some people do and don't like the
pipes. It comes down to whether they like cats.
Ian,
(a piper, as well as a SCDer)
Sydney Australia

----- Original Message -----
From: <RuddBaron@aol.com>
To: <strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de>
Sent: Monday, December 18, 2000 6:31 AM
Subject: Re: Music was Dress Standards

> As for the origins of the bagpipes, they basically took a
> cat, put it in a bag for transport, and then hooked up some
> pipes to it for breathing. The carrier could periodically
> blow into one of the tubes to put more air into the bag, and
> they soon noticed the sounds that were produced, and the bagpipes
> were soon developed. Now, if someone wanted to play a joke,
> they could remove the musician's cat from the bag, and when the
> musician tried to play, he would get quite a surprise and exclaim
> "Someone has let the cat out of the bag!" :)
>
> --
> RuddBaron@aol.com
>
>

Music was Dress Standards

Message 24181 · Thomas G. Mungall, III · 18 Dec 2000 03:44:12 · Top

The Irish invented whiskey.
The Scots improved on it, and made single malt whisky.
The Irish invented the kilt.
The Scots improved on it, put tartan patterns on it and gave it a sporran.
The Irish invented porrige.
The Scots improved on it with malt and honey and milk.
The Irish invented the bagpipes.
The Scots haven't got the joke yet.
------

----- Original Message -----
From: "Ian Thorn" <ayeupmeduck@hotmail.com>
To: <strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de>
Sent: Sunday, December 17, 2000 4:56 PM
Subject: Re: Music was Dress Standards

> That may go some way to explaining why some people do and don't like the
> pipes. It comes down to whether they like cats.
> Ian,
> (a piper, as well as a SCDer)
> Sydney Australia
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: <RuddBaron@aol.com>
> To: <strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de>
> Sent: Monday, December 18, 2000 6:31 AM
> Subject: Re: Music was Dress Standards
>
>
> > As for the origins of the bagpipes, they basically took a
> > cat, put it in a bag for transport, and then hooked up some
> > pipes to it for breathing. The carrier could periodically
> > blow into one of the tubes to put more air into the bag, and
> > they soon noticed the sounds that were produced, and the bagpipes
> > were soon developed. Now, if someone wanted to play a joke,
> > they could remove the musician's cat from the bag, and when the
> > musician tried to play, he would get quite a surprise and exclaim
> > "Someone has let the cat out of the bag!" :)
> >
> > --
> > RuddBaron@aol.com
> >
> >
>

Music was Dress Standards

Message 24183 · SMiskoe · 18 Dec 2000 06:31:58 · Top

Lancers Quadrilles are often done to Gilbert & Sullivan music. Patience and
Trial by Jury are 2 sets I recall. The Lancers were popular at the time of
G&S and done to the popular tunes of the day. I suppose that means a
relatively contemporary quadrille would be danced to the Yellow Submarine.
Cheers,
Sylvia Miskoe, Concord, NH USA

Music was Dress Standards

Message 24186 · S.M. Gent · 18 Dec 2000 19:25:38 · Top

Ron wrote:
=20
> Have you come across the Ian Cruickshanks two versions of The
> Fisherman's Reel ? He did one to tunes from Gilbert and Sullivan
> and it was so popular he has done a second version using different
> tunes.

Thanks Ron. I heard this recording a while ago, but didn't know what it
was. Does anyone know where I can get a copy?

Se=F3naid
(who is slightly hyper having just finished her last university exam
EVER!)

Music was Dress Standards

Message 24190 · ron.mackey · 19 Dec 2000 00:15:03 · Top

>
> Ron wrote:
>
> > Have you come across the Ian Cruickshanks two versions of The
> > Fisherman's Reel ? He did one to tunes from Gilbert and Sullivan
> > and it was so popular he has done a second version using different
> > tunes.
>
> Thanks Ron. I heard this recording a while ago, but didn't know what it
> was. Does anyone know where I can get a copy?
>
> Se=F3naid
> (who is slightly hyper having just finished her last university exam

Hi, Seonaid
Hope the results are as good as you wish them to be!

Try
lewis innes <kelpi@sndc.i-way.co.uk>

Or
William Crawford on
highlander.music@zetnet.co.uk


Cheers, Ron :)

< 0 Ron Mackey,(Purveyor of Pat's Party Pieces)
'O> Mottingham,
/#\ London. UK.
l>
Ron.Mackey@btinternet.com

Music was Dress Standards

Message 24191 · SallenNic · 19 Dec 2000 02:14:57 · Top

In a message dated 17/12/00 1:44:24 am, RuddBaron@aol.com writes:

>Without a piano and/or accordian, one needs something to provide the bass
>and preferably also a chord structure. Perhaps a flute quartet, i.e., a
>flute, a violin, a viola, and a cello, would suffice. But...the viola and
>cello aren't "Scottish," so what did the Scots use for bass in the distant
>past? Percussion is the only thing that comes to mind.
I believe percussion is a comparatively recent interloper on the dance music
scene. One of the Gows certainly played the Cello, as is evidenced by the
painting "The Highland Dancer".
Nicolas B., Lanark,
Scotland.

Music was Dress Standards

Message 24192 · RuddBaron · 19 Dec 2000 02:53:05 · Top

In a message dated 12/18/2000 6:16:33 PM Central Standard Time,
SallenNic@aol.com writes:

<< I believe percussion is a comparatively recent interloper on the dance
music
scene. One of the Gows certainly played the Cello, as is evidenced by the
painting "The Highland Dancer". >>

--- I don't know. The Celtic drum goes back a long time, though I don't know
if it was used for dance or not. Riverdance makes frequent use of drums...but
that's not exactly accurately traditional.

Music was Dress Standards

Message 24200 · Mike Briggs · 19 Dec 2000 15:49:52 · Top

<m=EAme chose>, n'est-ce pas?

Mike
--=20
---------------------------------------------
Norma Briggs Voice: 608 835 0914 =20
Michael J. Briggs Fax: 608 835 0924
BRIGGS LAW OFFICE
1519 Storytown Rd Oregon WI 53575-2521 USA
---------------------------------------------
HTTP://BRIGGSLAW.HOMESTEAD.COM
---------------------------------------------

Music was Dress Standards

Message 24205 · RuddBaron · 19 Dec 2000 18:13:05 · Top

In a message dated 12/19/2000 7:50:18 AM Central Standard Time,=20
brigglaw@execpc.com writes:

<< <m=EAme chose>, n'est-ce pas?
=20
--- Oui, c'est ca. Vous avez raison. Les mots originals ont ete <<meme=20
chose>>, mais le signification est la meme. (Pardon, mais je ne vuex pas use=
r=20
les accents parce que il est beaucoup de travaille. :) ) =20

s/RBJ

Music was Dress Standards

Message 24207 · Rita Hamilton · 19 Dec 2000 21:40:13 · Top

What does this have to do with the subject?

RuddBaron@aol.com wrote:
>=20
> In a message dated 12/19/2000 7:50:18 AM Central Standard Time,
> brigglaw@execpc.com writes:
>=20
> << <m=EAme chose>, n'est-ce pas?
>=20
> --- Oui, c'est ca. Vous avez raison. Les mots originals ont ete <<meme
> chose>>, mais le signification est la meme. (Pardon, mais je ne vuex pa=
s user
> les accents parce que il est beaucoup de travaille. :) )
>=20
> s/RBJ
>=20
> --
> RuddBaron@aol.com

--=20
May neither your strings nor your spirit ever break,
May your harp and your soul always be in tune.
Rita

Music was Dress Standards

Message 24211 · RuddBaron · 19 Dec 2000 23:00:33 · Top

In a message dated 12/19/2000 1:40:41 PM Central Standard Time,
harpist@infi.net writes:

<< What does this have to do with the subject? >>

--- There was a partial quote made, I finished the quote, and someone pointed
out that I had omitted a word. They were correct, and that was my response to
that.

Franglais

Message 24208 · Jodie Hebert · 19 Dec 2000 21:53:36 · Top

What a delightfully-phrased message, Rudd - thanks for the laugh, whether
you intended it or not!
Jodie (Montreal Branch)

Date sent: Tue, 19 Dec 2000 11:12:24 EST
From: RuddBaron@aol.com
To: strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de
Subject: Re: Music was Dress Standards

> In a message dated 12/19/2000 7:50:18 AM Central Standard Time,=20
> brigglaw@execpc.com writes:
>
> << <m=EAme chose>, n'est-ce pas?
> =20
> --- Oui, c'est ca. Vous avez raison. Les mots originals ont ete <<meme=20
> chose>>, mais le signification est la meme. (Pardon, mais je ne vuex pas use=
> r=20 les accents parce que il est beaucoup de travaille. :) ) =20
>
> s/RBJ
>
> --
> RuddBaron@aol.com
>

Jodie Parker-Hebert
McLennan Library, Collections Dept.
McGill University, Montreal, PQ Canada
Voice: 514-398-4782 FAX: 514-398-7184

Franglais

Message 24212 · RuddBaron · 19 Dec 2000 23:01:42 · Top

In a message dated 12/19/2000 1:54:08 PM Central Standard Time,
Hebert@library.mcgill.ca writes:

<< What a delightfully-phrased message, Rudd - thanks for the laugh, whether
you intended it or not!
Jodie (Montreal Branch) >>

--- Je vous en prie.

Music was Dress Standards

Message 24193 · Anselm Lingnau · 19 Dec 2000 09:54:57 · Top

SallenNic@aol.com writes:

> I believe percussion is a comparatively recent interloper on the dance =
music =

> scene. One of the Gows certainly played the Cello, as is evidenced by t=
he =

> painting "The Highland Dancer".

It's probably just as well to remember that country dancing isn't all
that ancient an idea either, and that it didn't come from Scotland in
the first place. Being a genteel kind of pastime it was danced to the
genteel sounds of genteel, refined instruments such as the fiddle,
'cello et cetera. Or, to quote Susie Petrov, Scottish musician and
occasional contributor to this list, `Scottish dance music is classical
music in disguise'. No rude drums there in the 18th century.

Anyway, I happen to think that sticking to `tradition' for its own sake
is as stifling a concept in SCD music as it is in the dancing itself. We
must look at the tradition of music and dance to try and understand why
things are what they are, but we should use that knowledge to shape the
flow of ideas that make up the future of our art, rather than dismiss
all new ideas outright. Who cares whether the accordion was invented
`only' 150 years ago rather than brought from Palestine by Richard the
Lionheart? Fifty years ago SCD bands had trumpets and clarinets, now
they have electronic pianos -- but they're still playing tunes composed
200 years ago. Plus =E7a change ...

Anselm
-- =

Anselm Lingnau ......................... lingnau@tm.informatik.uni-frankf=
urt.de
I want smart software, but if I can't have that, I want dumb software tha=
t
knows it is dumb and comes to me for help, not dumb software that thinks =
it is
smart and tells me lies it believes to be true. -- J. =
Fieber

Music was Dress Standards

Message 24199 · RuddBaron · 19 Dec 2000 15:17:32 · Top

In a message dated 12/19/2000 1:55:49 AM Central Standard Time,=20
lingnau@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de writes:

<< Plus =E7a change ... >>

...plus c'est la meme.=20

Music was Dress Standards

Message 24220 · Steve Wyrick · 20 Dec 2000 06:51:55 · Top

Anselm Lingnau wrote:

> It's probably just as well to remember that country dancing isn't all
> that ancient an idea either, and that it didn't come from Scotland in
> the first place. Being a genteel kind of pastime it was danced to the
> genteel sounds of genteel, refined instruments such as the fiddle,
> 'cello et cetera. Or, to quote Susie Petrov, Scottish musician and
> occasional contributor to this list, `Scottish dance music is classical
> music in disguise'. No rude drums there in the 18th century.

Country dancing may have originally been a genteel pastime, however, for an
idea of how it was done in Scotland in the 18th century I refer you to Major
Edward Topham, who in 1775 wrote about SCD in his Letters from Edinburgh:

"The general dance here is a reel, which requires that particular sort of
step to dance properly, of which none but the people of the country can have
any idea...They will sit totally unmoved at the most sprightly airs of an
English country dance, but the moment one of these tunes is played...up they
start, animated with new life, and you would imagine they had been bit by a
tarantula... The young people in England only consider dancing as an
agreeable means of bringing them together. But the Scotch admire the reel
for its own merit alone, and may truly be said to dance for the sake of
dancing. A Scotchman comes into an assembly room as he would into a field
of exercise, dances till he is literally tired, possibly without ever
looking at his partner, or almost knowing who he dances with. In most
countries the men have a partiality for dancing with a woman; but here I
have frequently seen four gentlemen perform one of these reels seemingly
with the same pleasure and perseverance as they would have done, had they
had the most sprightly girl for a partner...
"Another of the national dances is a kind of quick minuet, or what the
Scotch call a "Straspae." We in England are said to walk a minuet: this is
gallopping a minuet. Nothing of the minuet is preserved except the figure;
the step and time most resemble a hornpipe--and I leave you to dwell upon
the picture of a gentleman full-dressed and a lady in a hoop dancing a
hornpipe before a large assembly.
"The Scotch dance more ungracefully than any other people I have yet seen.
They have nothing but their enthusiasm and activity to recommend them. It
is no civility to attempt to shew them anything new: they hold their dances
sacred and will bear no innovation on that point. Cotillions and other
French dances have not travelled so far north...
"The gravest men here, with the exception of the ministers, think it no
disgrace to dance. I have seen a professor, who has argued most learnedly
and most wisely in a morning, forgetting all his gravity in an evening and
dancing away to the best of his abilities...
"Their great agility, vivacity, and variety of hornpipe steps render [the
reel] to them a most entertaining dance; but to a stranger the sameness of
the figure makes it trifling and insipid, though you are employed during the
whole time of its operation; which indeed is the reason why it is so
peculiarly adapted to the Scotch, who are little acquainted with the
attitude of standing still."

This doesn't exactly sound like a genteel, refined style of dancing to me,
and I'm not so sure your 'rude drums' wouldn't have fit in back then! -Steve
--
Steve Wyrick <sjwyrick@earthlink.net> -- Concord, CA

Music was Dress Standards

Message 24230 · Pia Walker · 20 Dec 2000 23:12:19 · Top

AH Well - not much has changed then has it :>)

And with regards to the professor - I have seen my learned husband do
exactly the same thing :>)

Pia
----- Original Message -----
From: Steve Wyrick <sjwyrick@earthlink.net>
To: <strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de>
Sent: Wednesday, December 20, 2000 4:48 AM
Subject: Re: Music was Dress Standards

> Anselm Lingnau wrote:
Major
> Edward Topham, who in 1775 wrote about SCD in his Letters from Edinburgh:
>
> "The general dance here is a reel, which requires that particular sort
of
> step to dance properly, of which none but the people of the country can
have
> any idea...They will sit totally unmoved at the most sprightly airs of an
> English country dance, but the moment one of these tunes is played...up
they
> start, animated with new life, and you would imagine they had been bit by
a
> tarantula... The young people in England only consider dancing as an
> agreeable means of bringing them together. But the Scotch admire the reel
> for its own merit alone, and may truly be said to dance for the sake of
> dancing. A Scotchman comes into an assembly room as he would into a field
> of exercise, dances till he is literally tired, possibly without ever
> looking at his partner, or almost knowing who he dances with. In most
>

Music was Dress Standards

Message 24233 · Anselm Lingnau · 21 Dec 2000 08:16:32 · Top

[I was going to reply to this yesterday but didn't get around to it.]

Steve Wyrick <sjwyrick@earthlink.net> writes:

> Country dancing may have originally been a genteel pastime, however, for an
> idea of how it was done in Scotland in the 18th century I refer you to Major
> Edward Topham, who in 1775 wrote about SCD in his Letters from Edinburgh:
>
> "The general dance here is a reel, which requires that particular sort of
> step to dance properly, of which none but the people of the country can have
> any idea...They will sit totally unmoved at the most sprightly airs of an
> English country dance, but the moment one of these tunes is played...up they
> start, animated with new life, and you would imagine they had been bit by a
> tarantula...

Yes, but of course the good Major refers to the Scottish Reel, as in
`Foursome Reel', rather than the country dance. Note how he contrasts
the dance `which requires that particular sort of step' (Highland-style
setting steps) to `(the most sprightly airs of) an English country
dance'. At that time there wasn't really a difference between Scottish
and English country dances. A bit further on he says

> but here I
> have frequently seen four gentlemen perform one of these reels seemingly
> with the same pleasure and perseverance as they would have done, had they
> had the most sprightly girl for a partner...

so he's evidently talking about a four-person dance. Furthermore, his
observation that

> to a stranger the sameness of
> the figure makes it trifling and insipid, though you are employed during the
> whole time of its operation; which indeed is the reason why it is so
> peculiarly adapted to the Scotch, who are little acquainted with the
> attitude of standing still."

also fits the Scottish Reel better than the country dance, where after
all you do usually get a few bars of rest every so often.

> This doesn't exactly sound like a genteel, refined style of dancing to me,
> and I'm not so sure your 'rude drums' wouldn't have fit in back then!

Well, compared to the genteel country dancing Major Topham must have
been used to from home (including `cotillions and other French dances'),
the Scottish Reel must be a fairly disconcerting sight ... Too bad he
doesn't comment on the orchestration of the music.

Just for the record, let it be known that personally, I don't have
anything against a rude drum if tastefully played :^)

Anselm
--
Anselm Lingnau ......................... lingnau@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de
In a free society, there's no such thing as someone stealing your opportunity.
If you've got something that you can do that nobody else can do, people will
pay you to do that. If you don't know how to do something, people won't pay
you to not do it. -- P. J. O'Rourke

Music was Dress Standards

Message 24235 · Iain E. Garden Richardson · 21 Dec 2000 11:36:54 · Top

Steve Wyrick wrote:

> "The Scotch dance more ungracefully than any other people I have yet seen.
> They have nothing but their enthusiasm and activity to recommend them."

I love it - this would be a great slogan for a T-shirt !

Iain G R

---
Dr Iain E. G. Richardson
School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering
The Robert Gordon University, Schoolhill, Aberdeen, Scotland, AB10 1FR
Telephone (0)(+44)1224 262403 Facsimile (0)(+44)1224 262444
Email i.g.richardson@rgu.ac.uk
http://www.eee.rgu.ac.uk/research/comms/videocoding.html

Music (2)

Message 24194 · Martin.Sheffield · 19 Dec 2000 10:28:39 · Top

and, while we're on the subject, may I express one of my long term wishes?

I would so much like to hear the 6/8 and 2/4 melodies of the baroque period
included in SCD music arrangements.

Bach, Haendel, Mozart may not have been Scottish, but they knew what kind
of music made one want to dance.

Martin,
in Grenoble, France.

http://perso.wanadoo.fr/scots.in.france/scd.htm
(dance groups, some new dances ...)

Music (2)

Message 24196 · Anselm Lingnau · 19 Dec 2000 10:37:07 · Top

Martin Sheffield <martin.sheffield@wanadoo.fr> writes:

> Bach, Haendel, Mozart may not have been Scottish, but they knew what kind
> of music made one want to dance.

`Kerr's Collection of Merry Melodies' is a fairly massive multi-volume
anthology of popular dance music that first came out about 120 years
ago. There's one volume in particular (number 4, I think) that contains
a fair number of tunes from various operas of the period, with some
Mozart, Haydn et cetera thrown in for good measure. And as Sylvia
mentioned, musicians would draw upon the current popular favourites for
dances such as the Lancers, so it would probably not have been at all
unlikely to find `classical' music among all those jigs and reels.

In any case, in Niel Gow's day (a bit earlier than Kerr's Collection) a
professional musician like Niel would be called upon not only to provide
`traditional' dance music but also to entertain their employers
according to the latest continental fashions, so he would most certainly
have been familiar with much of the then-current `classical' repertoire.
It is very difficult to tell whether any of that found its way to the
dance floor at that time, though.

Anselm
--
Anselm Lingnau ......................... lingnau@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de
[I]f I have to choose a side to err on, I'd rather make the more interesting
mistake. -- Larry Wall

Music (2)

Message 24201 · Martin.Sheffield · 19 Dec 2000 16:40:04 · Top

Anselm wrote:

>... in Niel Gow's day , a
>professional musician would be called upon (...) to entertain their employers
>so (...)familiar with much of the then-current `classical' repertoire.
>It is very difficult to tell whether any of that found its way to the
>dance floor at that time, though.

But it doesn't seem to have fond it's way onto any CDs that I know of.

Actually there is an exception: somewhere in my collection, I know there's
a record with "air from Haydn" as title of one of the tunes. Can't remember
which one.

Martin,
in Grenoble, France.

http://perso.wanadoo.fr/scots.in.france/scd.htm
(dance groups, some new dances ...)

Nothing to do with SCD

Message 24209 · Martin.Sheffield · 19 Dec 2000 21:53:56 · Top

As we have recently enlarged the family with a young grandaughter,
and as our son-in-law has succeeded in taking a family photo where I am
neither scowling, sticking out my tongue, nor looking like something the
dog brought in,
I have added family group to my web site:
< http://perso.wanadoo.fr/scots.in.france/index.htm>

Note that I am kiltless, but am wearing a blue pullover.

Sticklers for fancy dress standards, please look somewhere else.

Happy holidays !

Martin in sunny Grenoble.

Nothing to do with SCD

Message 24224 · Pia Walker · 20 Dec 2000 15:20:30 · Top

I'm sure if you are only wearing a blue pull over, it will be difficult to
look away :>)

Pia
----- Original Message -----
From: M Sheffield <martin.sheffield@wanadoo.fr>
To: <strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de>
Sent: Tuesday, December 19, 2000 2:59 PM
Subject: Nothing to do with SCD

>
> As we have recently enlarged the family with a young grandaughter,
> and as our son-in-law has succeeded in taking a family photo where I am
> neither scowling, sticking out my tongue, nor looking like something the
> dog brought in,
> I have added family group to my web site:
> < http://perso.wanadoo.fr/scots.in.france/index.htm>
>
> Note that I am kiltless, but am wearing a blue pullover.
>
> Sticklers for fancy dress standards, please look somewhere else.
>
> Happy holidays !
>
> Martin in sunny Grenoble.
>
>
>
> --
> M Sheffield <martin.sheffield@wanadoo.fr>
>

Music (2)

Message 24202 · Alan Paterson · 19 Dec 2000 16:57:07 · Top

M Sheffield wrote:

> Actually there is an exception: somewhere in my collection, I know there's
> a record with "air from Haydn" as title of one of the tunes. Can't remember
> which one.

- Fly Not Yet from Bobby Crowe (Book 13)
- Oh Whistle and I'll Come Tae Ye My Lad from the Olympians Dances Old, Dances New

- Tarry a While from Bobby Brown.

There's also a tune called "Theme from Haydn" on Quarries' Jig by the
Craigellachie Band. Does anyone know if these 2 are the same tune? Graham?

Alan

Music (2)

Message 24210 · Doug Mills · 19 Dec 2000 22:12:07 · Top

M Sheffield wrote:

> and, while we're on the subject, may I express one of my long term wishes?
>
> I would so much like to hear the 6/8 and 2/4 melodies of the baroque period
> included in SCD music arrangements.

One of the things I really liked about the Berkley Players was that they
weren't afraid to try new instruments (the hammer dulcimer!), and that the
arrangements had a classical edge.

The two dances they recorded that spring immediatly to mind as having a
distinct baroque feel are The Sailor and Red House.

Doug Mills
Christchurch, NZ

Music (2)

Message 24214 · hways · 20 Dec 2000 03:02:37 · Top

Alan Paterson wrote:

> Concerning records with with "air from Haydn" as title of one of the tunes.

> - Tarry a While from Bobby Brown.
>

And Bobby credits Jacques Offenbach for "The Marines Hymn" on his Irish Rover Medley.

Harry

Music (2)

Message 24215 · RuddBaron · 20 Dec 2000 03:09:24 · Top

In a message dated 12/19/2000 7:03:05 PM Central Standard Time,
hways@ix.netcom.com writes:

<< And Bobby credits Jacques Offenbach for "The Marines Hymn" on his Irish
Rover Medley. >>

--- I think someone ought to work the Coast Guard's *Semper Paratus* into the
music set for something like Irish Rover. :)

Music (2)

Message 24225 · Marilynn Knight · 20 Dec 2000 15:22:04 · Top

Doug,

Thank you for mentioning the hammered dulcimer, one of my truly favorite
'dance instruments' with rich, IMHO, implications for SCD music of the near
future!!!!

Marilynn Latta Knight
Columbia, SC, alas, neither promise nor reality of snow...

-----Original Message-----
From: Doug Mills [mailto:radagast@cyberxpress.co.nz]
Sent: Tuesday, December 19, 2000 3:14 PM
To: strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de
Subject: Re: Music (2)

M Sheffield wrote:

> and, while we're on the subject, may I express one of my long term wishes?
>
> I would so much like to hear the 6/8 and 2/4 melodies of the baroque
period
> included in SCD music arrangements.

One of the things I really liked about the Berkley Players was that they
weren't afraid to try new instruments (the hammer dulcimer!), and that the
arrangements had a classical edge.

The two dances they recorded that spring immediatly to mind as having a
distinct baroque feel are The Sailor and Red House.

Doug Mills
Christchurch, NZ

--
Doug Mills <radagast@cyberxpress.co.nz>

Music (2)

Message 24226 · Lara D. Friedman~Shedlov · 20 Dec 2000 17:57:44 · Top

On Wed, 20 Dec 2000, Doug Mills wrote:
>
> One of the things I really liked about the Berkley Players was that they
> weren't afraid to try new instruments (the hammer dulcimer!), and that the
> arrangements had a classical edge.
>
Thistledown, the band that regularly plays for us, uses a hammer dulcimer
all the time. We really enjoy the sound. The band also uses flute,
concertina, piano, and fiddle and features cameos by assorted other
instruments such as banjos and mandolins.

Lara Friedman-Shedlov
Minneapolis, MN

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Lara Friedman~Shedlov "Thwart not the librarian!"
ldfs@bigfoot.com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Music (2)

Message 24231 · Lee Fuell · 20 Dec 2000 23:50:23 · Top

Patty & I also recently had the pleasure of dancing to a really good
Scottish (style, not nationality) fiddler accompanied by hammer
dulcimer. I found the combination more pleasing than fiddle plus
piano, but don't have the musical vocabulary to explain why. So
here's my question: What are the origins of the hammer dulcimer,
and how is it related to the American mountain dulcimer that is part
of our Appalachian musical heritage (which in turn draws much
from Scotland and Ireland, FWIW)?

Lee

Date sent: Wed, 20 Dec 2000 10:57:41 -0500 (EST)
From: "Lara D. Friedman~Shedlov" <laradf@alumni.si.umich.edu>
To: strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de
Subject: Re: Music (2)
Send reply to: strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de
Date forwarded: Wed, 20 Dec 2000 16:57:45 +0100

> On Wed, 20 Dec 2000, Doug Mills wrote:
> >
> > One of the things I really liked about the Berkley Players was that they
> > weren't afraid to try new instruments (the hammer dulcimer!), and that the
> > arrangements had a classical edge.
> >
> Thistledown, the band that regularly plays for us, uses a hammer dulcimer
> all the time. We really enjoy the sound. The band also uses flute,
> concertina, piano, and fiddle and features cameos by assorted other
> instruments such as banjos and mandolins.
>
> Lara Friedman-Shedlov
> Minneapolis, MN
>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Lara Friedman~Shedlov "Thwart not the librarian!"
> ldfs@bigfoot.com
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>
>
>

Music

Message 24195 · Martin.Sheffield · 19 Dec 2000 10:28:41 · Top

Nicolas B wrote:

>I believe percussion is a comparatively recent interloper on the dance music
>scene.

And, alas, ever more pervasive.
May we hope that it is a mere passing fashion (trying to keep up with
teenage bands with their monotonous mechanical noise)? Even some pieces of
classical music get reedited with percussive accompaniment these days to
appeal to low brow taste.

How pleasant, by contrast, the SCD bands, such as the Sound Company, that
do not drown the music under percussion, but let us hear and enjoy the
flavour of the different instruments.

Thank you, Sylvia. Thank you, Etienne.
(inter alia)
I don't think Nicolas has produced any SCD recordings yet ...

Martin,
in Grenoble, France.

http://perso.wanadoo.fr/scots.in.france/scd.htm
(dance groups, some new dances ...)

Music

Message 24204 · Priscilla M. Burrage · 19 Dec 2000 17:18:19 · Top

On Tue, 19 Dec 2000, M Sheffield wrote:

> Nicolas B wrote:
>
> >I believe percussion is a comparatively recent interloper . . .

and Martin replied:

> How pleasant, by contrast, the SCD bands, ... let us hear and enjoy the
> flavour of the different instruments.
>
> Thank you, Sylvia. Thank you, Etienne.
> (inter alia)
> I don't think Nicolas has produced any SCD recordings yet ...

If you want to be inspired to do the dances know today as English country
dances, listen to Nicolas's band playing great English country dance
music.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Priscilla Burrage Vermont US
(pburrage@zoo.uvm.edu)

Music

Message 24217 · Patricia Ruggiero · 20 Dec 2000 03:34:03 · Top

RuddBaron wrote:

"Without a piano and/or accordian, one needs something to provide the bass
and preferably also a chord structure. Perhaps a flute quartet, i.e., a
flute, a violin, a viola, and a cello, would suffice. But...the viola and
cello aren't "Scottish," so what did the Scots use for bass in the distant
past? Percussion is the only thing that comes to mind."

I sought information from an SCD fiddler, Malcolm Stephens. Here is his
reply:

"Neil Gow's brother Donald did, in fact, play 'cello (mis-identified as
"bass" in the well-known painting of outside dancers: "The Highland Dance").
Although I wasn't around in 17th - 19th century Scotland, my impression is
that a 'cello/fiddle duo was quite popular for dances. Also, being
"country" dances, I would expect that whatever capable musicians were handy
performed (often a fiddle, probably also flute/tin whistle, bodrhan, etc.).
It's unlikely that pipes were used extensively; pipers often performed
Pibroch (perhaps using the "small pipes" indoors), and sometimes were used
in battle or otherwise as signalling devices outdoors.
"On a related note, one of Scotland's most famous fiddlers and composers of
fiddle tunes, James Scott Skinner, began as a 'cellist and later converted
to violin."

Pat
in snowy Virginia, where SCD class was cancelled tonight

Music

Message 24274 · Mike Briggs · 6 Jan 2001 20:40:29 · Top

What's the recommended music for Domino Five (Haynes, Carnforth Book 4)
and Friday's Child (Forbes)? Reply privately.

Mike
--
---------------------------------------------
Norma Briggs Voice: 608 835 0914
Michael J. Briggs Fax: 608 835 0924
BRIGGS LAW OFFICE
1519 Storytown Rd Oregon WI 53575-2521 USA
---------------------------------------------
HTTP://BRIGGSLAW.HOMESTEAD.COM
---------------------------------------------

Music

Message 24277 · Martin.Sheffield · 7 Jan 2001 10:42:59 · Top

At 12:38 06/01/01 -0600, you wrote:
>What's the recommended music for ...Friday's Child (Forbes)?

Nicol McLaren recorded a CD for Forbes' dances and played 'Friday Morning'
by Frank Reid, but whether anyone actually reccommended the tune for this
dance, I wouldn't know.
Martin,
in Grenoble, France.

http://perso.wanadoo.fr/scots.in.france/scd.htm
(dance groups, some new dances ...)

Music

Message 24278 · Mike Briggs · 7 Jan 2001 16:10:08 · Top

Thanks. For several years we've been using generic jigs for Friday's
Child, but for some reason I thought next time (February 18, if you
happen to be anywhere close!) I'd use the "real" original tune.

Mike
--
---------------------------------------------
Norma Briggs Voice: 608 835 0914
Michael J. Briggs Fax: 608 835 0924
BRIGGS LAW OFFICE
1519 Storytown Rd Oregon WI 53575-2521 USA
---------------------------------------------
HTTP://BRIGGSLAW.HOMESTEAD.COM
---------------------------------------------

Music

Message 24279 · Mike Briggs · 7 Jan 2001 16:15:53 · Top

Sorry. The last one was meant to be private.

Mike
--
---------------------------------------------
Norma Briggs Voice: 608 835 0914
Michael J. Briggs Fax: 608 835 0924
BRIGGS LAW OFFICE
1519 Storytown Rd Oregon WI 53575-2521 USA
---------------------------------------------
HTTP://BRIGGSLAW.HOMESTEAD.COM
---------------------------------------------

Music

Message 24293 · Graham Hamilton · 8 Jan 2001 11:16:24 · Top

Friday morning is indeed the correct original for this dance and the entire
CD, The Craigevar Dance Collection by Nicol McLaren and the Glencraig Band,
is an excellent CD with a lot of very good dances on it. My favourites, in
addition to Friday's Child" are "Whistlin' in the Kitchen", "Butterfly
Bride" and especially "Queen's View". Nicol's latest CD, Clashmadden, is
also highly recommendable as a dance CD.

Both CDs are available on the Shielburn label and more details can be
obtained from Stuart Forbes at Shielburn@aol.com.

Graham Hamilton

-----Original Message-----
From: M Sheffield <martin.sheffield@wanadoo.fr>
To: strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de
<strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de>
Date: 07 January 2001 08:49
Subject: Re: Music

At 12:38 06/01/01 -0600, you wrote:
>What's the recommended music for ...Friday's Child (Forbes)?

Nicol McLaren recorded a CD for Forbes' dances and played 'Friday Morning'
by Frank Reid, but whether anyone actually reccommended the tune for this
dance, I wouldn't know.
Martin,
in Grenoble, France.

http://perso.wanadoo.fr/scots.in.france/scd.htm
(dance groups, some new dances ...)

--
M Sheffield <martin.sheffield@wanadoo.fr>

Music was Dress Standards, now Fisherman's Reel

Message 24219 · Angus Henry · 20 Dec 2000 06:07:25 · Top

Lassie Come & Dance wi'Me Cruickshanks Cod End
Nice to See You Cruickshank, Ian Fisherman's Reel (No.2
Pinafore) For a British Tar is a Soaring Soul (alt.)

>Ron wrote:
>
>> Have you come across the Ian Cruickshanks two versions of The
>> Fisherman's Reel ? He did one to tunes from Gilbert and Sullivan
>> and it was so popular he has done a second version using different
>> tunes.
>
>Thanks Ron. I heard this recording a while ago, but didn't know what it
>was. Does anyone know where I can get a copy?
>
>Seonaid Mairi Gent <smg08@students.stir.ac.uk>

The first (and preferred) version of Fisherman's Reel has as lead
tune "The Cod End", and the track is available on Ian Cruickshank's
CD "Lassie Come & Dance wi'Me". The second version (labelled "No.2,
Pinafore") has as lead tune "For a British Tar is a Soaring Soul",
and the track is available on Ian Cruickshank's CD "Nice to See You".

Both should be available from TACSound or Highlander Music.

Angus
--

* * * * * * * * * * * * *
Angus & Puka Henry:- 4 Eagle Court, WULAGI, NT 0812, AUSTRALIA
PHONE: (International) + 61 (0)8 8927 9203
FAX: as phone, but phone FIRST to arrange for it to be switched on!
Website: <http://www.octa4.net.au/ahenry/>

Previous thread: Good Manners was Dress Standards=snobbery
Next thread: Asilomar Romantic
A Django site.