strathspey Archive: set and spring points

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set and spring points

Message 22369 · Campbell Downie · 6 Sep 2000 08:12:03 · Top

Hi

I have just come across the instruction

37 - 40 All dance set and spring points to partner

How do I do this?

Campbell

Campbell Downie
PO Box 101269
Scottsville 3209
South Africa
Tel & Fax 027 (0)33 3961238

set and spring points

Message 22370 · Simon Scott · 6 Sep 2000 08:56:32 · Top

> Hi
>
> I have just come across the instruction
>
> 37 - 40 All dance set and spring points to partner
>
> How do I do this?

Bar 37 pas de basque on right foot
38 pas de basque on left foot
39 point forward with left foot while hopping on right
then point forward with right foot while hopping on left
40 repeat bar 39

So it is two pas de basque and four spring points.
This will leave you with the right foot free to begin the next setting or
travelling step.

According to your instructions above this would be danced by you and your
partner, while facing each other.

Simon Scott
Vancouver

set and spring points

Message 22375 · Oberdan Otto · 6 Sep 2000 19:49:18 · Top

>I have just come across the instruction
>
> 37 - 40 All dance set and spring points to partner
>
>How do I do this?

Hmmm...this is an imprecise instruction because "spring points" IS a
form of setting. Most likely it means "All set with Pas de Basque and
Spring Points to partner".

That means two bars of PdB and two bars of spring points. In this
context spring points after the second PdB is: hop onto the right
foot pointing the left foot straight forward (like a low jete in PdB,
but to 4th position rather than 4th intermediate), hop onto the left
foot pointing the right foot forward and repeat. So it is (2 bars):
point Left, point Right, point Left, point Right.

Some people also like to raise the arms to imitate what Highland
dancers do, but I don't remember whether Highland dancers actually
raise the arms when doing spring points (somebody?). SCD dancers who
have not had Highland training usually look much better with their
arms down. Droopy raised arms don't look Highland, they just look
strange.

Cheers, Oberdan.

184 Estaban Drive, Camarillo, CA 93010-1611 USA
Voice: (805) 389-0063, FAX: (805) 484-2775, email: ootto@ootto.com

set and spring points

Message 22380 · Lee Fuell · 7 Sep 2000 10:55:08 · Top

This is about 10% responsive to Oberdan's question: I saw an old
film clip from early in WWII of a soldier in a Highland regiment
doing spring points with both arms raised. He was doing a version
(perhaps a spoof?) of the sword dance over crossed shovels. The
clip was part of the "Bagpipe: Instrument of War" documentary.

Lee

Date sent: Wed, 6 Sep 2000 08:02:47 -0700
To: strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de
From: Oberdan Otto <ootto@ootto.com>
Subject: Re: set and spring points
Send reply to: strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de
Date forwarded: Wed, 06 Sep 2000 17:49:18 +0200

>
> Some people also like to raise the arms to imitate what Highland
> dancers do, but I don't remember whether Highland dancers actually
> raise the arms when doing spring points (somebody?). SCD dancers who
> have not had Highland training usually look much better with their
> arms down. Droopy raised arms don't look Highland, they just look
> strange.
>
> Cheers, Oberdan.

set and spring points

Message 22382 · Dewdney Andrew · 7 Sep 2000 11:07:01 · Top

well, many Highland dancers raise their arms to 3rd during the points, with
the arms in 1st during the setting. The trick to arms is to think high. When
you feel as though they are impossibly high, then normally they'll be OK!
And don't think of pulling the arms up, hanging from the ceiling, think of
pushing up and holding with the shoulder muscles (like those big stags)
instead. More strength and more likely to stay up whilst dancing. Bringing
them down neatly and in time to the music and exactly in time with all the
other dances is next week's lesson!!!
Andrew

> -----Original Message-----
> From: Lee Fuell [SMTP:fuell@mindspring.com]
> Sent: Thursday, September 07, 2000 8:55 AM
> To: strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de
> Subject: Re: set and spring points
>
> This is about 10% responsive to Oberdan's question: I saw an old
> film clip from early in WWII of a soldier in a Highland regiment
> doing spring points with both arms raised. He was doing a version
> (perhaps a spoof?) of the sword dance over crossed shovels. The
> clip was part of the "Bagpipe: Instrument of War" documentary.
>
> Lee
>
> Date sent: Wed, 6 Sep 2000 08:02:47 -0700
> To: strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de
> From: Oberdan Otto <ootto@ootto.com>
> Subject: Re: set and spring points
> Send reply to: strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de
> Date forwarded: Wed, 06 Sep 2000 17:49:18 +0200
>
> >
> > Some people also like to raise the arms to imitate what Highland
> > dancers do, but I don't remember whether Highland dancers actually
> > raise the arms when doing spring points (somebody?). SCD dancers who
> > have not had Highland training usually look much better with their
> > arms down. Droopy raised arms don't look Highland, they just look
> > strange.
> >
> > Cheers, Oberdan.
>
>
>
> --
> "Lee Fuell" <fuell@mindspring.com>

set and spring points

Message 22385 · Chris1Ronald · 7 Sep 2000 11:21:42 · Top

In my limited experience, highland dancers doing spring points are holding their dresses with their hands....

Cheers, Chris.

(Chris Ronald, New York).

set and spring points

Message 22386 · Campbell Downie · 7 Sep 2000 11:28:03 · Top

Hi Simon

Thanks Quite easy, isn't it?

Campbell

At 00/09/05 10:00:00 PM, you wrote:
>
>> Hi
>>
>> I have just come across the instruction
>>
>> 37 - 40 All dance set and spring points to partner
>>
>> How do I do this?
>
>
>Bar 37 pas de basque on right foot
> 38 pas de basque on left foot
> 39 point forward with left foot while hopping on right
> then point forward with right foot while hopping on left
> 40 repeat bar 39
>
>So it is two pas de basque and four spring points.
>This will leave you with the right foot free to begin the next setting or
>travelling step.
>
>According to your instructions above this would be danced by you and your
>partner, while facing each other.
>
>Simon Scott
>Vancouver
>
>
>--
>"Simon Scott" <sscott@portal.ca>
>
>
Campbell Downie
PO Box 101269
Scottsville 3209
South Africa
Tel & Fax 027 (0)33 3961238

set and spring points

Message 22388 · Campbell Downie · 7 Sep 2000 11:28:06 · Top

Hi Oberdan

Thanks for the message Quite easy isn't it?

Campbell

At 00/09/06 08:02:00 AM, you wrote:
>>I have just come across the instruction
>>
>> 37 - 40 All dance set and spring points to partner
>>
>>How do I do this?
>
>Hmmm...this is an imprecise instruction because "spring points" IS a
>form of setting. Most likely it means "All set with Pas de Basque and
>Spring Points to partner".
>
>That means two bars of PdB and two bars of spring points. In this
>context spring points after the second PdB is: hop onto the right
>foot pointing the left foot straight forward (like a low jete in PdB,
>but to 4th position rather than 4th intermediate), hop onto the left
>foot pointing the right foot forward and repeat. So it is (2 bars):
>point Left, point Right, point Left, point Right.
>
>Some people also like to raise the arms to imitate what Highland
>dancers do, but I don't remember whether Highland dancers actually
>raise the arms when doing spring points (somebody?). SCD dancers who
>have not had Highland training usually look much better with their
>arms down. Droopy raised arms don't look Highland, they just look
>strange.
>
>Cheers, Oberdan.
>
>184 Estaban Drive, Camarillo, CA 93010-1611 USA
>Voice: (805) 389-0063, FAX: (805) 484-2775, email: ootto@ootto.com
>
>
Campbell Downie
PO Box 101269
Scottsville 3209
South Africa
Tel & Fax 027 (0)33 3961238

set and spring points

Message 22392 · Pia Walker · 7 Sep 2000 12:14:32 · Top

I suppose you can do the sword dance over lots of things - I personally have
tried crossed teaspoons and crossed bread knives (OK - it was in my younger
days, and after a few beers) - here in this area we have a dancer who swears
he has seen the sword dance carried out over 4 ladies - what a sight :>)

Pia
----- Original Message -----
From: Lee Fuell <fuell@mindspring.com>
To: <strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de>
Sent: Wednesday, September 06, 2000 10:01 PM
Subject: Re: set and spring points

> This is about 10% responsive to Oberdan's question: I saw an old
> film clip from early in WWII of a soldier in a Highland regiment
> doing spring points with both arms raised. He was doing a version
> (perhaps a spoof?) of the sword dance over crossed shovels. The
> clip was part of the "Bagpipe: Instrument of War" documentary.
>
> Lee
>
> Date sent: Wed, 6 Sep 2000 08:02:47 -0700
> To: strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de
> From: Oberdan Otto <ootto@ootto.com>
> Subject: Re: set and spring points
> Send reply to: strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de
> Date forwarded: Wed, 06 Sep 2000 17:49:18 +0200
>
> >
> > Some people also like to raise the arms to imitate what Highland
> > dancers do, but I don't remember whether Highland dancers actually
> > raise the arms when doing spring points (somebody?). SCD dancers who
> > have not had Highland training usually look much better with their
> > arms down. Droopy raised arms don't look Highland, they just look
> > strange.
> >
> > Cheers, Oberdan.
>
>
>
> --
> "Lee Fuell" <fuell@mindspring.com>
>

set and spring points

Message 22397 · Ian Brockbank · 7 Sep 2000 12:51:39 · Top

Hi Pia,

> I suppose you can do the sword dance over lots of things - I personally have
> tried crossed teaspoons and crossed bread knives (OK - it was in my younger
> days, and after a few beers) - here in this area we have a dancer who swears
> he has seen the sword dance carried out over 4 ladies - what a sight :>)

It used to be a favourite of New Scotland (Edinburgh University society)
at
IVFDF (Inter-Varsity Folk Dance Festival) - though I think it was more
usually
a Broadladies instead of a Lady Dance.

I don't know whether they still do it.

Ian
--
IndigoVision Ltd http://www.indigovision.com/
The Edinburgh Technopole, Bush Loan, Edinburgh, EH26 0PJ
Tel: [+44] (0)131 475 7200 Fax: [+44] (0)131 475 7201
Personal: ian@scottishdance.net http://www.scottishdance.net
Feed the world: http://www.thehungersite.com/

set and spring points

Message 22398 · Pia Walker · 7 Sep 2000 13:05:54 · Top

It is not so much the sight of 4 ladies on the floor that bothers me, but
the view they have :>)

Pia
----- Original Message -----
From: Ian Brockbank <i.brockbank@indigovision.com>
To: <strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de>
Sent: Thursday, September 07, 2000 9:46 AM
Subject: RE: set and spring points

> It used to be a favourite of New Scotland (Edinburgh University society)
> at
> IVFDF (Inter-Varsity Folk Dance Festival) - though I think it was more
> usually
> a Broadladies instead of a Lady Dance.
>
> I don't know whether they still do it.
>
> Ian
> --
> IndigoVision Ltd http://www.indigovision.com/
> The Edinburgh Technopole, Bush Loan, Edinburgh, EH26 0PJ
> Tel: [+44] (0)131 475 7200 Fax: [+44] (0)131 475 7201
> Personal: ian@scottishdance.net http://www.scottishdance.net
> Feed the world: http://www.thehungersite.com/
>

set and spring points

Message 22400 · Ian Brockbank · 7 Sep 2000 14:28:08 · Top

Hi Pia,

> > It used to be a favourite of New Scotland (Edinburgh University society)
> > at IVFDF (Inter-Varsity Folk Dance Festival) - though I think it was more
> > usually a Broadladies instead of a Lady Dance.
>
> It is not so much the sight of 4 ladies on the floor that bothers me, but
> the view they have :>)

They were all willing volunteers...

Ian
--
IndigoVision Ltd http://www.indigovision.com/
The Edinburgh Technopole, Bush Loan, Edinburgh, EH26 0PJ
Tel: [+44] (0)131 475 7200 Fax: [+44] (0)131 475 7201
Personal: ian@scottishdance.net http://www.scottishdance.net
Feed the world: http://www.thehungersite.com/

set and spring points

Message 22387 · Anselm Lingnau · 7 Sep 2000 11:28:05 · Top

Oberdan Otto <ootto@ootto.com> writes:

> Some people also like to raise the arms to imitate what Highland =

> dancers do, but I don't remember whether Highland dancers actually =

> raise the arms when doing spring points (somebody?).

It depends a lot on the dance. Certainly when doing PdB and spring
points in a general `setting situation', such as during a country dance,
it would be all right to raise the arms for the spring points although
there are various dances which explicitly specify 1st position arms
during the spring points, and others which give 3rd position (both arms
raised).

> SCD dancers who have not had Highland training usually look much
> better with their arms down. Droopy raised arms don't look Highland,
> they just look strange.

Again, it depends. If you look at books like Flett & Flett or Thurston's
_Scotland's_Dances_, you will find that especially in social dancing
people wouldn't bother about getting their 3rd position arms just right.
Particularly in the Highland reel, which is the social dance which
especially seems to call for raised arms, and which we don't do a lot
these days, the upper arms would often just stick out more or less
horizontally. I agree that it doesn't look like what you see (or want to
see, anyway) on a competition stage at Highland games, but at least the
sloppy dancers may have it correct from a traditional point of view as
far as social dancing is concerned :^) For demonstration dancing, of
course you want to go for the current competitive-style arms in all
their glory!

Andrew Dewdney's hints are good (thinking `high' is always a good idea
in Highland). The only items I could add are the following:

- When I was taught Highland dancing, the general idea was to put your =

hands where you could just see them out of the corner of your eye. We
were also told to imagine holding up a big hoop or balloon so the shape=

of the arms would be roundish rather than trapezoid.

- It *is* important to think about bringing the arms up or down (even
though that's supposed to be next week's lesson), not only to look =

good but also out of consideration for other dancers. In all the =

exuberance of a crowded ballroom, it is easy for those hands to =

connect with parts of other dancers' bodies on their way. This
especially applies to Tulloch-style propelled pivot turns as in
Schiehallion or 1314 (both of which dances are very popular indeed
here in Germany, as Andrew surely is aware) where many dancers like
to raise their free arm. Often that arm starts out fine at the
beginning of the turn, but then the dancers' concentration on the
whooshing-round with a wonderful partner combined with the effects
of the centrifugal force tend to make the hand drop to where the
people in the next set keep their heads, hair-dos, glasses, and
assorted other bits of anatomy and/or wardrobe. When I teach or
review these dances I always try to point this out to the class.

Anselm
-- =

Anselm Lingnau ......................... lingnau@tm.informatik.uni-frankf=
urt.de
Software engineering as a field is a lot like psychology as a field. Tha=
t is,
there is real science/engineering being done, but there is also a lot of =
pop
stuff that's only one step above astrology. -- Tim=
Smith

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