strathspey Archive: The Music will tell you & Waverley

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The Music will tell you & Waverley

Message 22220 · mlbrown · 29 Aug 2000 23:21:40 · Top

Oberdan wrote:
> This is the same transition we do in
> Waverley where the dancers change places with left hand on the
> sidelines into Poussette. ..... The beginning
> positions of the couples in the Poussette are offset in the
> counter-clockwise direction (rather than aligned in the middle of the
> set)--the couples who naturally end the left hand change facing IN
> will come across the set to meet their partners for the first "away
> from the centre..."

What an interesting interpretation; I have always danced the movement the
same way I dance(d) Fidget (it used to be a Full certificate dance), namely
the left hand change is used to bring everyone into the middle to start the
Poussette, including the polite turn - and that is the way we did it at St
Andrews in the dance from book 41.

Malcolm

Malcolm & Helen Brown
Tir-Nan-Og - York (UK)

The Music will tell you & Waverley

Message 22234 · Priscilla M. Burrage · 30 Aug 2000 17:10:13 · Top

Re poussette starting position:

I took my full cert. in 1961 when the poussette in all dances had the
"three-point" positioning described by Oberdan (below). From 1968 to
1972 I did not teach, and when I came back to teaching, everyone wondered
what this funny "three-point" positioning was. All poussettes were couple
parallel to couple in the middle as described by Malcom (below). I felt
like Rip van Winkle (early American literature).

On Tue, 29 Aug 2000, mlbrown wrote:

> Oberdan wrote:
> > This is the same transition we do in
> > Waverley where the dancers change places with left hand on the
> > sidelines into Poussette. ..... The beginning
> > positions of the couples in the Poussette are offset in the
> > counter-clockwise direction (rather than aligned in the middle of the
> > set)--the couples who naturally end the left hand change facing IN
> > will come across the set to meet their partners for the first "away
> > from the centre..."
>
> What an interesting interpretation; I have always danced the movement the
> same way I dance(d) Fidget (it used to be a Full certificate dance), namely
> the left hand change is used to bring everyone into the middle to start the
> Poussette, including the polite turn - and that is the way we did it at St
> Andrews in the dance from book 41.
>
> Malcolm

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Priscilla Burrage Vermont US
(pburrage@zoo.uvm.edu)

The Music will tell you & Waverley

Message 22240 · eclyde · 30 Aug 2000 18:28:42 · Top

And my copy of "Won't you join the dance" by Jean C. Milligan,
dated 1976, shows that the couples offset as Priscilla describes,
with the 1st woman and 2nd man starting side by side.
In fact, I can recall Dr. Milligan teaching it that way
on a number of occasions.

In the written description, "Generally, poussette follows
a lead down the middle and up, and, as they come up,
the first couple move slightly to the man's side,
face each other and join both hands. As the first couple
pass him, the second man crosses over to join both
hands with his partner, who takes a step forward
to meet him."

I think it makes the formation easier for beginners. Why was it changed?

Eric

----- Original Message -----
From: Priscilla M. Burrage <pburrage@zoo.uvm.edu>
To: <strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de>
Sent: Wednesday, August 30, 2000 9:10 AM
Subject: Re: The Music will tell you & Waverley

> Re poussette starting position:
>
> I took my full cert. in 1961 when the poussette in all dances had the
> "three-point" positioning described by Oberdan (below). From 1968 to
> 1972 I did not teach, and when I came back to teaching, everyone wondered
> what this funny "three-point" positioning was. All poussettes were couple
> parallel to couple in the middle as described by Malcom (below). I felt
> like Rip van Winkle (early American literature).
>
> On Tue, 29 Aug 2000, mlbrown wrote:
>
> > Oberdan wrote:
> > > This is the same transition we do in
> > > Waverley where the dancers change places with left hand on the
> > > sidelines into Poussette. ..... The beginning
> > > positions of the couples in the Poussette are offset in the
> > > counter-clockwise direction (rather than aligned in the middle of the
> > > set)--the couples who naturally end the left hand change facing IN
> > > will come across the set to meet their partners for the first "away
> > > from the centre..."
> >
> > What an interesting interpretation; I have always danced the movement
the
> > same way I dance(d) Fidget (it used to be a Full certificate dance),
namely
> > the left hand change is used to bring everyone into the middle to start
the
> > Poussette, including the polite turn - and that is the way we did it at
St
> > Andrews in the dance from book 41.
> >
> > Malcolm
>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Priscilla Burrage Vermont US
> (pburrage@zoo.uvm.edu)
>
>
>
>

The Music will tell you & Waverley

Message 22245 · Oberdan Otto · 30 Aug 2000 21:18:57 · Top

>And my copy of "Won't you join the dance" by Jean C. Milligan,
>dated 1976, shows that the couples offset as Priscilla describes,
>with the 1st woman and 2nd man starting side by side.
>In fact, I can recall Dr. Milligan teaching it that way
>on a number of occasions.
>
>In the written description, "Generally, poussette follows
>a lead down the middle and up, and, as they come up,
>the first couple move slightly to the man's side,
>face each other and join both hands. As the first couple
>pass him, the second man crosses over to join both
>hands with his partner, who takes a step forward
>to meet him."
>
>I think it makes the formation easier for beginners. Why was it changed?
>
>Eric

Oh, my! Have I opened another can of worms???

Cheers, Oberdan.

184 Estaban Drive, Camarillo, CA 93010-1611 USA
Voice: (805) 389-0063, FAX: (805) 484-2775, email: ootto@ootto.com

The Music will tell you & Waverley

Message 22246 · Oberdan Otto · 30 Aug 2000 21:19:06 · Top

>Oberdan wrote:
> > This is the same transition we do in
> > Waverley where the dancers change places with left hand on the
> > sidelines into Poussette. ..... The beginning
> > positions of the couples in the Poussette are offset in the
> > counter-clockwise direction (rather than aligned in the middle of the
> > set)--the couples who naturally end the left hand change facing IN
> > will come across the set to meet their partners for the first "away
> > from the centre..."
>
>What an interesting interpretation; I have always danced the movement the
>same way I dance(d) Fidget (it used to be a Full certificate dance), namely
>the left hand change is used to bring everyone into the middle to start the
>Poussette, including the polite turn - and that is the way we did it at St
>Andrews in the dance from book 41.
>
>Malcolm

Interesting indeed! The "alternative" offset starting position for
the Poussette (for dances like Waverley AND Fidget) was part of _my_
Certificate training! :))

I am not close to any of my "manuals" right now. I don't recall if
there is actually any written documentation of the offset starting
alternative. I had believed that the offset alternative was generally
accepted practice. It is interesting to have these little surprises
now and again. I just saw Priscilla's and Eric's replies, so I guess
there is documentation for the "offset" form!

I originally readily accepted the "offset alternative" for this
situation because it made a lot of sense to me. On the left hand
change, the people passing through the middle of the set are
naturally curving away from the middle (counter-clockwise). Because
of the courtesy turn, they are at a disadvantage both visually and
movement-wise, whereas their counterparts have lots of flexibility
and counter-clockwise momentum to easily carry them past the
"aligned" position.

To start the Poussette aligned, ALL the people have to kill their
counter-clockwise motion, and then start it up again! They actually
have to work against the natural flow of the dance. Skilled dancers
would have no particular difficulty doing that, and I suppose if one
had been practicing it for years it would not even seem difficult.
But the fact is that the dancers DO have to break the flow of the
dance to get aligned.

Some dances just seem to flow while other seem quite choppy. Well,
perhaps some of the choppiness we perceive is not inherent to the
dance but owes to artificial constraints we put on the figure
transitions.

Cheers, Oberdan.

184 Estaban Drive, Camarillo, CA 93010-1611 USA
Voice: (805) 389-0063, FAX: (805) 484-2775, email: ootto@ootto.com

The Music will tell you & Waverley

Message 22254 · Rebecca Sager · 31 Aug 2000 14:11:22 · Top

I've been enjoying this thread. My first reaction when dancing this for
the first time, back in April when John and Jan Douglas taught a
mini-workshop here in Georgia and introduced the dance inscribed to John,
was "Hey, this transition is just like Waverley!" One of our teachers
said, "Yes, but in Waverley the poussette begins offset from the center".
Seems like the poussette needs to begin wherever it is most natural - in
the center if it follows down the middle and up, or if both couples are
stepping in, offset if that flows from the previous formation.

Becky

Becky Sager
Marietta GA USA

The Music will tell you & Waverley

Message 22256 · Susi Mayr · 31 Aug 2000 14:32:44 · Top

I seem to have missed something somewhere - where is it stated that the
poussette (specifically) in Waverley - begins offset from the centre ?

Susi
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
Susi Mayr
Vienna, Austria
susi@redrose.co.at
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

Rebecca Sager wrote:
>
> I've been enjoying this thread. My first reaction when dancing this for
> the first time, back in April when John and Jan Douglas taught a
> mini-workshop here in Georgia and introduced the dance inscribed to John,
> was "Hey, this transition is just like Waverley!" One of our teachers
> said, "Yes, but in Waverley the poussette begins offset from the center".
> Seems like the poussette needs to begin wherever it is most natural - in
> the center if it follows down the middle and up, or if both couples are
> stepping in, offset if that flows from the previous formation.
>
> Becky
>
> Becky Sager
> Marietta GA USA
>
> --
> Rebecca Sager <bsager3@juno.com>

The Music will tell you & Waverley

Message 22259 · Priscilla M. Burrage · 31 Aug 2000 17:48:48 · Top

On Thu, 31 Aug 2000, Susi Mayr wrote:

> I seem to have missed something somewhere - where is it stated that the
> poussette (specifically) in Waverley - begins offset from the centre ?
> -----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Rebecca Sager wrote:
> >
> > I've been enjoying this thread. My first reaction when dancing this for
> > the first time, back in April when John and Jan Douglas taught a
> > mini-workshop here in Georgia and introduced the dance inscribed to John,
> > was "Hey, this transition is just like Waverley!" One of our teachers
> > said, "Yes, but in Waverley the poussette begins offset from the center".
> > Seems like the poussette needs to begin wherever it is most natural - in
> > the center if it follows down the middle and up, or if both couples are
> > stepping in, offset if that flows from the previous formation.

It was because offset from the center (second man and first woman shoulder
to shoulder) until some time in the 1960s.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Priscilla Burrage Vermont US
(pburrage@zoo.uvm.edu)

The Music will tell you & Waverley

Message 22260 · Susi Mayr · 31 Aug 2000 18:00:09 · Top

I understood that that was the general rule at the time (as the diagram
in my copy of "Won't You Join the Dance" shows) rather than something
specific to Waverley.

So if the general rule changes (see Manual) is there any particular
reason why Waverley should - or shouldn not - change ?

Susi

"Priscilla M. Burrage" wrote:
>
> On Thu, 31 Aug 2000, Susi Mayr wrote:
>
> > I seem to have missed something somewhere - where is it stated that the
> > poussette (specifically) in Waverley - begins offset from the centre ?
> > -----------------------------------------------------------------------
> >
> > Rebecca Sager wrote:
> > >
> > > I've been enjoying this thread. My first reaction when dancing this for
> > > the first time, back in April when John and Jan Douglas taught a
> > > mini-workshop here in Georgia and introduced the dance inscribed to John,
> > > was "Hey, this transition is just like Waverley!" One of our teachers
> > > said, "Yes, but in Waverley the poussette begins offset from the center".
> > > Seems like the poussette needs to begin wherever it is most natural - in
> > > the center if it follows down the middle and up, or if both couples are
> > > stepping in, offset if that flows from the previous formation.
>
> It was because offset from the center (second man and first woman shoulder
> to shoulder) until some time in the 1960s.
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Priscilla Burrage Vermont US
> (pburrage@zoo.uvm.edu)
>

--
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
Susi Mayr
Vienna, Austria
susi@redrose.co.at
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

The Music will tell you & Waverley

Message 22261 · Coletta Busse · 31 Aug 2000 19:34:01 · Top

Changes in the "General Rule" should not be considered retroactive. When I
passed my Full Certificate (1996) I was given "Quadrille Country dance" for
my exam. I was in a panic was over the transition from Ladies Chain to a
pousette. Since the general rule had changed since the publication of the
dance, I was trying to get first lady from second man's place to first
lady's, lined up with second lady ready for the pousette in NO BARS, with
second couple in the way. There was no note in the current manual about this
offset start for the poussette (I looked). But it was my exam dance so I did
my darnedest. I even enlisted three other VERY knowledgable people to walk
it with me (actually, I asked one, she enlisted her husband and the fellow
who'd stopped by for cocktails). The concenses was "that's a VERRA fast
turn! Almost a Burl!" Making that dance conform to the new "general rule" is
stupid! A dance should be danced in the context that it was written, unless
there is overwhelming improvement doing it by the new general rule.

Coletta Busse
Milpitas, CA. USA
_________________________________________________________________________
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The Music will tell you & Waverley

Message 22265 · Oberdan Otto · 31 Aug 2000 21:19:53 · Top

>I seem to have missed something somewhere - where is it stated that the
>poussette (specifically) in Waverley - begins offset from the centre ?
>
>Susi

I don't think it is specifically stated anywhere. It is part of many
aspects of SCD folklore about how things should be done, and which
are not necessarily universally known or accepted.

As I have been composing this message, I have been watching some of
the other replies. I am disturbed by the idea that as a consequence
of a dictum occurring at a certain time, I should be required to
dance the SAME transition differently depending on when the dances
were published. I find this notion absurd.

Becky's note--

>Seems like the poussette needs to begin wherever it is most natural - in
>the center if it follows down the middle and up, or if both couples are
>stepping in, offset if that flows from the previous formation.

follows my own philosophy of performing figure transitions in a way
that fits the dance. The fundamental idea of TRANSITION is that to
fit two formations together, one or both formations are slightly
modified from their "standard" forms. Transitions in this context
occur so often in our dances that it seems rare for a formation to be
danced exactly by its formal definition.

A related part of my philosophy of figure transitions in SCD is to
pay attention to how dancers of average skill perform them in social
situations. I think this scenario gives a pretty good indication of
the natural flow of a dance. By dancers of average skill, I do not
mean beginning dancers--I mean typical competent dancers (that means
most SCD dancers). Highly skilled dancers do not necessarily provide
a good measure of natural form for a social dance, because they can
do things that most dancers cannot.

So, if you watch dancers of average skill in social situations doing
the transition to Poussette in Fidget, Waverley and The Music Will
Tell You, I think you will see an offset beginning for the Poussette,
even if they were taught in class to start the Poussette aligned in
the middle! What this means is that dancers tend to do the natural
thing, even if they have not been given permission to do it by their
teachers. It makes sense to me to give them permission to dance
naturally to begin with!

I associate "unnatural" with "non-social" or "elitist". As a promoter
of SCD as a social dance form, I have little patience for prescribed
awkwardness.

Cheers, Oberdan.

184 Estaban Drive, Camarillo, CA 93010-1611 USA
Voice: (805) 389-0063, FAX: (805) 484-2775, email: ootto@ootto.com

The Music will tell you & Waverley

Message 22266 · Susi Mayr · 31 Aug 2000 21:28:51 · Top

That's actually quite interesting as it assumes that one would know (or
be able to find out) what the original context was.

My copy of Miss Milligan's Miscellany Vol.1 has no publication date and
no information about the origins of "Quadrille Country Dance". The
Manual says nothing to the purpose either. TACNotes describes the entry
into the poussette from positions "in the middle" (but it does at least
tell you how to get there).

Now I know that I bought both MMMI and "Won't You Join the Dance" (with
the offset starting position for the poussette) in 1977 so I would be
able to figure it all out eventually but it wouldn't be so easy for
someone who only knew the Manual.

Out of curiosity, Coletta - how did you teach it at the exam ? Did
anyone comment on what you did (which must have been fine seeing you
passed) ?

Susi
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
Susi Mayr
Vienna, Austria
susi@redrose.co.at
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

Coletta Busse wrote:
>
> Changes in the "General Rule" should not be considered retroactive. When I
> passed my Full Certificate (1996) I was given "Quadrille Country dance" for
> my exam. (...) Making that dance conform to the new "general rule" is
> stupid! A dance should be danced in the context that it was written, unless
> there is overwhelming improvement doing it by the new general rule.
>
> Coletta Busse
> Milpitas, CA. USA
> _________________________________________________________________________
> Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com.
>
> Share information about yourself, create your own public profile at
> http://profiles.msn.com.
>
> --
> "Coletta Busse" <cmbusse@hotmail.com>

--

The Music will tell you & Waverley

Message 22268 · Malcolm and Helen Brown · 31 Aug 2000 22:35:16 · Top

Oberdan said

> By dancers of average skill, I do not
> mean beginning dancers--I mean typical competent dancers (that means
> most SCD dancers).

> So, if you watch dancers of average skill in social situations doing
> the transition to Poussette in Fidget, Waverley and The Music Will
> Tell You, I think you will see an offset beginning for the Poussette,
> even if they were taught in class to start the Poussette aligned in
> the middle! What this means is that dancers tend to do the natural
> thing, even if they have not been given permission to do it by their
> teachers. >

I learnt the Book 41 dances in the Seniors class at St Andrews. (For
those who don't know, the Seniors class is made up of teachers, very
advanced dancers, former examiners who feel they now cannot dance to their
previously high standard, together with the injured.) A wealth of
experience is in this class and no-one tried to do the poussette offset.
Nobody even asked a question about it and we always ask questions so that
we can have a rest!

Mind you there were questions about which hand to drop for the double
triangles in Connie's Jig - and even when we were told, we tried
alternative versions!

Helen

--
_ _
|_|_ |_| Malcolm & Helen Brown - York (UK) - m.brown@netcomuk.co.uk (Tir-Nan-Og)
_ |_|_
|_| _|_| Connecting via NETCOM Internet Ltd
|_|

The Music will tell you & Waverley

Message 22269 · mlbrown · 31 Aug 2000 23:19:20 · Top

Becky wrote:

>Seems like the poussette needs to begin wherever it is most natural - in
> the center if it follows down the middle and up, or if both couples are
> stepping in, offset if that flows from the previous formation.

I cannot find the Branch library box at the moment, so I cannot refer to my
earliest edition of Won't You Join the Dance - but as this was the nth
edition (after the gap of several years when it was out of print), I
wouldn't consider it that much of an authority.

So I have looked up the various sources that I could locate without too much
trouble to see what they said about the Poussette:
1) The facsimile edition of Mrs Stewarts copy of Book 1 (Now available from
the RSCDS)
This describes it ....."The modern form is to waltz round each other.
Twenty or thirty years ago the couples polka'd round each other. It is said
that the old manner was for partners to take one another's hands and push
pull......" - unfortunately it does not go into detail about starting
positions!

2) The original edition I have of Book 1, which advertises books 1,2 and 3
on the back cover
....... "Partners take hands and turn, with eight Pas de Basque steps,
the woman starting with the right foot, the man with the left foot. Two
steps to turn into each of the four positions (see Fig D, a,b,c,d)" .....
Unfortunately the figure is not a lot of help

3) 101 Scottish Country Dances
......."Partners join both hands and take one pas de basque step to each
of the following directions. In this formation men begin with the left foot,
woman as usual with the right.
(1) Take a step away from the middle of the dance"
............
4) Introducing Scottish Country Dancing (The nearest thing I could get to a
text book when taking my certificate)
............"There has been a lot of careless talk about it not
mattering which foot the man uses- this is wrong it must be the
left"........(Followed by long explanation as to why).....
"Now for the actual performance of the poussette. As is seen
in the diagram, the two couples stand side by side, partners joining both
hands. In some dances the three deep poussette is used. Here the first lady
and second man are side by side.
On bar 1, one pas de basque is taken away from the centre
........."

and finally, and the reason I quoted Becky,
5) Hop Scotch, written by Mina Corson (an examiner of great experience) and
Christine Macintyre
..........."Poussette very often follows 'down the middle and up', and
as couple 1 dance back to the top of the set, the 1st boy, in preparation
for poussette, leads his partner towards the boys' side of the set" .......
and the diagram quite clearly shows them in an off-set position
to start.

When Helen started dancing in London in the early 60s, in classes taught by
qualified RSCDS teachers who danced in the team at St Andrews she never
encountered a staggered Poussette - in fact the first time we encountered
one was when we learnt Teviot Brig as one of the full certificate dances.

Malcolm & Helen Brown
Tir-Nan-Og - York (UK)

The Music will tell you & Waverley

Message 22273 · Oberdan Otto · 1 Sep 2000 00:39:09 · Top

>Oberdan said
> > By dancers of average skill, I do not
> > mean beginning dancers--I mean typical competent dancers (that means
> > most SCD dancers).
>
> > So, if you watch dancers of average skill in social situations doing
> > the transition to Poussette in Fidget, Waverley and The Music Will
> > Tell You, I think you will see an offset beginning for the Poussette,
> > even if they were taught in class to start the Poussette aligned in
> > the middle! What this means is that dancers tend to do the natural
> > thing, even if they have not been given permission to do it by their
> > teachers. >
>
>I learnt the Book 41 dances in the Seniors class at St Andrews. (For
>those who don't know, the Seniors class is made up of teachers, very
>advanced dancers, former examiners who feel they now cannot dance to their
>previously high standard, together with the injured.) A wealth of
>experience is in this class and no-one tried to do the poussette offset.
>Nobody even asked a question about it and we always ask questions so that
>we can have a rest!
>
>Mind you there were questions about which hand to drop for the double
>triangles in Connie's Jig - and even when we were told, we tried
>alternative versions!
>
>Helen

Now that is very interesting indeed!

By the way you describe the class, however, none of these dancers fit
my picture of "typical competent dancers". They sound as if they are
a good deal more skilled than that.

By your account, all of the dancers intended to begin the Poussette
aligned. But there is a difference between intent and actual
practice, especially for dancers of lesser skill.

Now that I think of it, however, I believe my notion of "offset" is
not necessarily as much as Eric described in his message:

>with the 1st woman and 2nd man starting side by side

which is quite a bit. I would consider that to be a maximum offset amount.

For this entry into the Poussette, all the dancers are moving fairly
quickly. Assuming they made an uninterrupted flow (i.e. no stopping)
from the left-hand change to the Poussette, it could be very
difficult to judge whether they began the Poussette exactly aligned
(i.e. they passed through the set centerline, springing "away from
the center" exactly on the downbeat of the first bar of the phrase).
Also, if it is difficult to judge by watching, it would seem at least
as difficult to actually dance that exact alignment. While I am a
proponent of good phrasing, that degree of precision hardly seems
necessary. I am beginning to wonder whether the notions of "aligned"
and "offset" are even useful for these dynamics.

Now if someone believed that the four dancers should come to a full
halt to be assured of being aligned for the beginning of the
Poussette, then that is quite contrary to my notion of how to dance
the transition.

You know, now I am going to have to get four experienced dancers
together to study the dynamics of this transition. I am beginning to
wonder if it is as simple as "aligned" or offset "with the 1st woman
and 2nd man starting side by side". Time to stop theorizing and do
some experiments with real dancers!

Cheers, Oberdan.

184 Estaban Drive, Camarillo, CA 93010-1611 USA
Voice: (805) 389-0063, FAX: (805) 484-2775, email: ootto@ootto.com

The Music will tell you & Waverley

Message 22283 · Coletta Busse · 1 Sep 2000 19:34:13 · Top

>Out of curiosity, Coletta - how did you teach it at the exam ? Did
>anyone comment on what you did (which must have been fine seeing you
>passed) ?

>Susi

I told the first lady she had to really move to make the transition, but
didn't specify where, exactly, she had to move to.

I stand by my remark about dancing a dance in it's original context unless
the current general rule makes a vast improvement. I am not proposing that
one has to research every dance. This is social dancing, you go with what
you've got. But I knew the Quadrille Country dance was old. The book they
loaned me in which to look it up was totally yellow! I knew that things have
been done differently in bygone eras, but I didn't know about starting a
poussette with the first lady and second man shoulder to shoulder. NOW, with
experience (and armed with that knowledge) I teach that dance differently,
as it would have been dance at the time it was devised, because it flows
better.
Coletta Busse
Milpitas, CA.
SF Branch

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The Music will tell you & Waverley

Message 22287 · Benjamin Stein · 1 Sep 2000 22:36:56 · Top

Coletta Busse wrote:

> >Out of curiosity, Coletta - how did you teach it at the exam ? Did
> >anyone comment on what you did (which must have been fine seeing you
> >passed) ?
>
> >Susi
>
> I told the first lady she had to really move to make the transition, but
> didn't specify where, exactly, she had to move to.
>
> I stand by my remark about dancing a dance in it's original context unless
> the current general rule makes a vast improvement. I am not proposing that
> one has to research every dance. This is social dancing, you go with what
> you've got. But I knew the Quadrille Country dance was old. The book they
> loaned me in which to look it up was totally yellow! I knew that things have
> been done differently in bygone eras, but I didn't know about starting a
> poussette with the first lady and second man shoulder to shoulder. NOW, with
> experience (and armed with that knowledge) I teach that dance differently,
> as it would have been dance at the time it was devised, because it flows
> better.
> Coletta Busse
> Milpitas, CA.
> SF Branch
>
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> --
> "Coletta Busse" <cmbusse@hotmail.com>

And how about "Tarry-a-while". It is a great dance with which to introduce new
dancers to the Pousette and the timing is much better with the "old" offset
position than with forcing the dancers into a "side-by-side to start the
formation.

Ben Stein
dancers@globalnetisp.net

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