strathspey Archive: Wind on Loch Fyne

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Wind on Loch Fyne

Message 21685 · Jean Young · 27 Jun 2000 09:40:31 · Top

We did this dance at our group meeting last night and got into some
argument about how it should be done. We've been doing it for some time,
and many of our group members are familiar with it from other places, but
no-one seems to have the original instructions, or indeed, ever to have
seen the original instructions. It's all word of mouth and memory.

Anyway, our questions are:

Bars 17-24 Do the ladies chase one place round, turn their partners and
then chase one more place round, ending having progressed a place, or do
the ladies chase half way round the circle each time, ending back in
original places?

Bars 25-32 Set and circle one place round? Circle two places round?
Circle half way round?

Various combinations of the above work in terms of the progression, but
what do the original instructions say.

Jean

PS Just for information, various combinations of the above do not work if
they are all being done by different people in the same set at the same
time. :)

Wind on Loch Fyne

Message 21686 · Alan Paterson · 27 Jun 2000 10:27:04 · Top

Jean Young wrote:

> We did this dance at our group meeting last night and got into some
> argument about how it should be done. We've been doing it for some time,
> and many of our group members are familiar with it from other places, but
> no-one seems to have the original instructions, or indeed, ever to have
> seen the original instructions. It's all word of mouth and memory.
>
> Anyway, our questions are:
>
> Bars 17-24 Do the ladies chase one place round, turn their partners and
> then chase one more place round, ending having progressed a place, or do
> the ladies chase half way round the circle each time, ending back in
> original places?

First variant. One place each time. The Men are travelling 2 places.

> Bars 25-32 Set and circle one place round? Circle two places round?
> Circle half way round?

Circle half way each time.

> Various combinations of the above work in terms of the progression, but
> what do the original instructions say.

My answers are based on the original instructions. (not that I have them exactly
to hand at the moment, but...)

Alan
--
Alan Paterson
Berne, Switzerland
mailto:alan@paterson.ch

Wind on Loch Fyne

Message 21688 · Lara D. Friedman~Shedlov · 27 Jun 2000 19:08:12 · Top

I actually learned this dance from the group that published it, Dunedin
Dancers in Edinburgh, Scotland. The dance is published in the first of
their five books of dances, and should be available from TACBooks.

On Tue, 27 Jun 2000, Jean Young wrote:

> Bars 17-24 Do the ladies chase one place round, turn their partners and
> then chase one more place round, ending having progressed a place, or do
> the ladies chase half way round the circle each time, ending back in
> original places?

Ladies dance one place round clockwise while men dance left hands across
two places. All turn partners once around and repeat, ending in progressed
places (one place counter clockwise from original positions).

> Bars 25-32 Set and circle one place round? Circle two places round?
> Circle half way round?

Bars 25-26 All set taking hands with partner
Bars 27-28 All circle to the left (go as far as you can get)
Bars 29-30 All turn partner with both hands*
Bars 31-32 All circle to the left, ending in the same place you were on
bars 25-26 (i.e. progressed places)

* In order to get all the way around back to the correct places by the end
of bar 32, we find it helps if we continue to move clockwise around the
circle a little bit as we do this turn. This is not stated in the
original dance instructions, but I remember being taught that way when I
learned the dance in Edinburgh.

Hope this helps

Regards,

Lara Friedman-Shedlov
Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Lara Friedman~Shedlov "Thwart not the librarian!"
ldfs@bigfoot.com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Wind on Loch Fyne

Message 21690 · Anselm Lingnau · 27 Jun 2000 19:31:30 · Top

Lara D. Friedman~Shedlov <laradf@alumni.si.umich.edu> writes:

> * In order to get all the way around back to the correct places by the end
> of bar 32, we find it helps if we continue to move clockwise around the
> circle a little bit as we do this turn. This is not stated in the
> original dance instructions, but I remember being taught that way when I
> learned the dance in Edinburgh.

I also learned this dance from a noted Edinburgh-based teacher, and the
moving-while-turning bit featured prominently in the explanation.

As a matter of interest, when the dance was first introduced in Germany
(years ago), there was apparently a slight mix-up with the instructions.
The popular German version of bars 25-32 went along the lines of

25-26 All set taking hands with partner
27-28 All circle one place to the left
29-30 All turn partner with both hands (no extra moving on here)
31-32 All circle another place to the left

Of course this changes the progression such that after the first turn
the original 3rd couple is in 1st place; somehow this never seemed to
bother anyone until the aforementioned teacher put us right, and by now
(several years later) the official version seems to have caught on.

Also, it's supposed to be *The* Wind on Loch Fyne. I seem to remember
that the late John Bowie Dickson, who devised the dance, was quite
particular about this.

Anselm
--
Anselm Lingnau ......................... lingnau@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de
In a free society, there's no such thing as someone stealing your opportunity.
If you've got something that you can do that nobody else can do, people will
pay you to do that. If you don't know how to do something, people won't pay
you to not do it. -- P. J. O'Rourke

The Wind on Loch Fyne

Message 21693 · Peter Hastings · 27 Jun 2000 19:46:43 · Top

This dance does require a certain amount of strength (and preparedness) if
it is to be danced as written :

2 bars to set

2 bars to circle half way

2 bars to turn partner BH

2 bars to circle half way

This may explain the popularity of the alternatives - circle one place
rather than half way (which changes the progression but doesn't destroy
the dance) or move while turning.

However all the crispness is lost in doing either of these and so is much
of the vigour of the dance. John Bowie Dickson was a great champion of
vigour in strathspeys (and much else in life, forbye) and I'm sure he
wrote exactly what he wanted to be done. He never wrote a sludgy
strathspey in his life.

my $0.02

Peter Hastings
Royal Observatory
Edinburgh
:)

The Wind on Loch Fyne

Message 21696 · Oberdan Otto · 28 Jun 2000 00:12:02 · Top

>This dance does require a certain amount of strength (and preparedness) if
>it is to be danced as written :
>
> 2 bars to set
> 2 bars to circle half way
> 2 bars to turn partner BH
> 2 bars to circle half way
>
>This may explain the popularity of the alternatives - circle one place
>rather than half way (which changes the progression but doesn't destroy
>the dance) or move while turning.
>
>However all the crispness is lost in doing either of these and so is much
>of the vigour of the dance. John Bowie Dickson was a great champion of
>vigour in strathspeys (and much else in life, forbye) and I'm sure he
>wrote exactly what he wanted to be done. He never wrote a sludgy
>strathspey in his life.

I agree with Peter that to dance this formation as written takes a
bit of practice, planning ahead and agreement among the dancers to
MOVE on the circles half way. I especially like the way the triangle
is inverted as the partners turn BH. Much of the beauty of the
formation is lost if you move while turning. If you are mentally
prepared, the setting to the left can give you plenty of impetus for
the half circle as can the exit from the turn BH into the second half
circle.

This dance was on our annual program in recent years and I recollect
that we danced this formation "as written". The inverted triangle was
definitely the target position for the turn (not a moving turn),
although occasionally the half circle didn't go quite far enough and
the couples had to start their turns before reaching the target
positions and move the turns onto the targets; but that is quite
different from having a floating turn with no target position. It is
very satisfying when the figure is done well.

Cheers, Oberdan.

184 Estaban Drive, Camarillo, CA 93010-1611 USA
Voice: (805) 389-0063, FAX: (805) 484-2775, email: ootto@ootto.com

The Wind on Loch Fyne

Message 21736 · mlbrown · 28 Jun 2000 22:38:29 · Top

Oberdan wrote regarding Wind on Loch Fyne:

> I especially like the way the triangle is inverted as the partners turn
BH.

In dances of this type, how do you think of the triangle? Are the couples
standing on the corners, or are they in the middle of the sides -
I must confess to being inconsistent, in that I think of them on the
corners,
whereas in a square set the couples are in the middle of the sides!
(Our friends seem to be fairly evenly split in their viewpoints)

I'm not convinced that it makes a good demonstration dance, despite having
put it on many times - it's difficult to keep the standing couples at an
angle, and
if you do then the asymmetry looks odd when they set.

Malcolm & Helen Brown
Tir-Nan-Og - York (UK)

The Wind on Loch Fyne

Message 21737 · Marilynn Knight · 28 Jun 2000 22:43:39 · Top

I'm not an expert at all on this, but I've always assumed the three couples
represented the three sides with the corners imagined. Based on that
thinking, it really bothers me when the couples don't stand neatly(not a
proper term, but isn't it self-explanatory?).

-----Original Message-----
From: mlbrown [mailto:mlbrown@supanet.com]
Sent: Wednesday, June 28, 2000 2:39 PM
To: strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de
Subject: Re: The Wind on Loch Fyne

Oberdan wrote regarding Wind on Loch Fyne:

> I especially like the way the triangle is inverted as the partners turn
BH.

In dances of this type, how do you think of the triangle? Are the couples
standing on the corners, or are they in the middle of the sides -
I must confess to being inconsistent, in that I think of them on the
corners,
whereas in a square set the couples are in the middle of the sides!
(Our friends seem to be fairly evenly split in their viewpoints)

I'm not convinced that it makes a good demonstration dance, despite having
put it on many times - it's difficult to keep the standing couples at an
angle, and
if you do then the asymmetry looks odd when they set.

Malcolm & Helen Brown
Tir-Nan-Og - York (UK)

--
"mlbrown" <mlbrown@supanet.com>

The Wind on Loch Fyne

Message 21749 · ron.mackey · 29 Jun 2000 02:36:48 · Top


> I'm not convinced that it makes a good demonstration dance, despite having
> put it on many times - it's difficult to keep the standing couples at an
> angle, and
> if you do then the asymmetry looks odd when they set.
>

Hi, Malcolm
In spite of there being quite a few nice triangulars I find that it
is almost impossible to keep a triangle in position in the ballroom
and only in class with a lot of browbeating.
However one that needs no such effort is Indian River Strathspey
(which is a great dance) as, wherever I have taught or danced it the
set keeps re-aligning itself.
See you... regards to Helen, etc...
Cheers, Ron :)

< 0 Ron Mackey,(Purveyor of Pat's Party Pieces)
'O> Mottingham,
/#\ London. UK.
l>
Ron.Mackey@btinternet.com

The Wind on Loch Fyne

Message 21753 · Todd Pierce · 29 Jun 2000 20:40:13 · Top

The Baton Rouge LA group once tried doing this dance in reel time. We didn't
make it - the figures must have been written with slow time in mind, because
in fast time we could not dance fast enough to finish in place!

It was strange as a lot of strathspeys can be done in quick time, but not
this one.

Todd Pierce
Asheville, NC

The Wind on Loch Fyne

Message 21755 · Richard L. Walker · 29 Jun 2000 21:55:50 · Top

The dance uses the two hand turn to the next position. Were you doing a two
hand turn to pas de basque to get to the next position? (Might give it a
whirl while at Thistle with the other dance junkies.)

"Richard L Walker"<rlwalker@granis.net>
Pensacola, FL USA 32504-7726

-----Original Message-----
From: Todd Pierce [mailto:tpierce@terrabase.com]
Sent: Thursday, June 29, 2000 12:40 PM
To: strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de
Subject: RE: The Wind on Loch Fyne

The Baton Rouge LA group once tried doing this dance in reel time. We didn't
make it - the figures must have been written with slow time in mind, because
in fast time we could not dance fast enough to finish in place!

It was strange as a lot of strathspeys can be done in quick time, but not
this one.

Todd Pierce
Asheville, NC

--
"Todd Pierce" <tpierce@terrabase.com>

The Wind on Loch Fyne

Message 21756 · Richard L. Walker · 29 Jun 2000 21:57:15 · Top

Opps - that was (supposed to be) private. Sorry about that. I don't even
know any dance junkies (heh heh).

"Richard L Walker"<rlwalker@granis.net>
Pensacola, FL USA 32504-7726

-----Original Message-----
From: Todd Pierce [mailto:tpierce@terrabase.com]
Sent: Thursday, June 29, 2000 12:40 PM
To: strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de
Subject: RE: The Wind on Loch Fyne

The Baton Rouge LA group once tried doing this dance in reel time. We didn't
make it - the figures must have been written with slow time in mind, because
in fast time we could not dance fast enough to finish in place!

It was strange as a lot of strathspeys can be done in quick time, but not
this one.

Todd Pierce
Asheville, NC

--
"Todd Pierce" <tpierce@terrabase.com>

The Wind on Loch Fyne

Message 21757 · Terry Glasspool · 29 Jun 2000 22:10:56 · Top

The comment about the Indian River Strathspey being self-aligning is
interesting. In my experience, it keeps trying to turn itself into a U,
even more so than The Wind on Loch Fyne.
In fact, we used this effect to turn it into a six couple demonstration
dance, by putting two sets end to end in a rectangle:
A3 B2
A1 B1
A2 B3
In addition to the nice mirroring effect of the two sets, the six dancers
can fill a very large space. It was particularly nice in a large room with
around the wall seating.

Terry Glasspool
Upstate NY, USA
GlassHall@aol.com

>> I'm not convinced that it makes a good demonstration dance, despite
having
>> put it on many times - it's difficult to keep the standing couples at an
>> angle, and
>> if you do then the asymmetry looks odd when they set.
>>
>
> Hi, Malcolm
> In spite of there being quite a few nice triangulars I find that
it
> is almost impossible to keep a triangle in position in the ballroom
> and only in class with a lot of browbeating.
> However one that needs no such effort is Indian River Strathspey
> (which is a great dance) as, wherever I have taught or danced it the
> set keeps re-aligning itself.
> See you... regards to Helen, etc...
> Cheers, Ron :)
>
> < 0 Ron Mackey,(Purveyor of Pat's Party Pieces)
> 'O> Mottingham,
> /#\ London. UK.
> l>
> Ron.Mackey@btinternet.com

The Wind on Loch Fyne

Message 21760 · Katharine Hoskyn · 29 Jun 2000 23:36:20 · Top

Malcolm Brown (Hi Malcolm), Marilyn Knight, Ron Mackey have
all made comments about the positioning of dancers for a triangular
dance similar to Wind on Loch Fyne and the difficulty of keeping
the shape of the set.

I have always thought of the dancers as being the sides of the
triangle with corners imagined (I love the way you expressed
Marilyn and it will use it).

Last year when I was almost driven to distraction by people
standing crookedly, I suddenly found myself saying to the call that
I would like each couple to imagine that they were standing against
a wall that was behind them and that the outside shoulders of
themselves and their partner both touched the wall. (It is easily
explained in class when you can demonstrate what you mean).

It worked and has worked subsequently also in square sets when
inexperienced dancers are standing on an untidy angle to their
partner. If a set starts to look untidy as the dance progresses I
only have to say "imagine the wall" and they straighten again.

And somehow other when they straightened up with their partner,
they also were more aware of their positioning in relation to other
couples in the set. Although it didn't entirely solve that problem.

I think the concept of standing beside someone and not looking at
them is not an entirely natural one and the crooked standing is an
attempt to be social. It is certainly an issue in early childhood
psychology and is important if taking children's classes -- but
maybe it extends beyond childhood too.

Katharine Hoskyn
Auckland, New Zealand

The Wind on Loch Fyne

Message 21761 · Norah Link · 29 Jun 2000 23:55:43 · Top

On 29 Jun 2000, Katharine Hoskyn wrote:
> I have always thought of the dancers as being the sides of the
> triangle with corners imagined ...
>
> ... I suddenly found myself saying to the call that
> I would like each couple to imagine that they were standing against
> a wall that was behind them and that the outside shoulders of
> themselves and their partner both touched the wall. ...
>
> I think the concept of standing beside someone and not looking at
> them is not an entirely natural one and the crooked standing is an
> attempt to be social. It is certainly an issue in early childhood
> psychology and is important if taking children's classes -- but
> maybe it extends beyond childhood too.
>

Katharine, you've made some very interesting points. I confess that I have
always thought of the triangular formation as standing on the vertices and
aligning oneself parallel to the side opposite - the idea of standing on the
sides never occurred to me until the question was raised on the list a
couple of days ago. So much so that I have actually had difficulty
visualizing it working. The point of couples not wanting to stand perfectly
side-by-side, though, is a really interesting one, and I could see it having
a very strong effect. It's true that we see it often in square sets as
well. The circular feel of a triangular set could make the effect even more
pronounced.

regards,
Norah Link (Montreal)

The Wind on Loch Fyne

Message 21767 · ron.mackey · 1 Jul 2000 02:39:28 · Top

>* The point of couples not wanting to stand perfectly side-by-side,
>though, is a really interesting one, and I could see it having
> a very strong effect.* It's true that we see it often in square sets as
> well. The circular feel of a triangular set could make the effect even more
> pronounced.
>
> regards,
> Norah Link (Montreal)

:)* Or does it illustrate that the one you are dancing with was not
your first choice ?? :-)

Cheers, Ron :)

< 0 Ron Mackey,(Purveyor of Pat's Party Pieces)
'O> Mottingham,
/#\ London. UK.
l>
Ron.Mackey@btinternet.com

Transforming between Strathspey and Quicktime (was The Wind on Loch Fyne)

Message 21758 · Oberdan Otto · 29 Jun 2000 22:19:59 · Top

>[Todd:] The Baton Rouge LA group once tried doing this dance in reel
>time. We didn't make it - the figures must have been written with
>slow time in mind, because in fast time we could not dance fast
>enough to finish in place!
>
>It was strange as a lot of strathspeys can be done in quick time, but not
>this one.

A lot depends on how you do the transformation. For example, turn BH
in Strathspey translates most directly to turn BH using skip change
(not PdB). Also, from a body dynamics point-of-view, Common
Schottishe (simple Strathspey Setting) translates most directly to
slip-to-the-right, then slip-to-the-left, not PdB setting. Anything
in quicktime with PdB basically puts the brakes on the movement. Many
of the movements in this dance rely on the smooth transitions
afforded by the particular Strathspey steps that are used. Setting
with PdB in quicktime has no analog in Strathspey time.

AND, of course, circling with a Strathspey travelling step translates
most directly to circling using skip change. That would seem like a
very odd translation given that slip step works so well for circles
in quicktime. Well, it turns out that the Strathspey travelling step
doesn't really work that well for circling in Strathspey time anyway.
However, circle to the left in quicktime translates most directly to
Strathspey time as Set to the left(ah), Set to the left(ah), Set to
the left(ah), Set to the left, which is not difficult once you get
the hang of it and requires none of the body contortions we force
upon ourselves using the travelling step. It seems doubtful that
Strathspey circles were actually originally done with a travelling
step.

***(ah = a subtle transitional movement with no lift behind).

By the way, if you are eager to do a triangular dance in quicktime
you might have a go at the Celtic Brooch (Foss). Great fun and very
challenging!

Cheers, Oberdan.

184 Estaban Drive, Camarillo, CA 93010-1611 USA
Voice: (805) 389-0063, FAX: (805) 484-2775, email: ootto@ootto.com

The Wind on Loch Fyne

Message 21754 · Oberdan Otto · 29 Jun 2000 21:20:12 · Top

>[Oberdan:] I especially like the way the triangle is inverted as
>the partners turn BH.
>
>[Malcolm/Helen:] In dances of this type, how do you think of the
>triangle? Are the couples standing on the corners, or are they in
>the middle of the sides -
>I must confess to being inconsistent, in that I think of them on the
>corners, whereas in a square set the couples are in the middle of the sides!
>(Our friends seem to be fairly evenly split in their viewpoints)

A very interesting observation. Frankly, I have always thought of the
couples at the vertices (points) of the triangle and as I discuss
below, I think this is the more helpful view.

It would seem that it shouldn't really make a difference whether one
views the couple as at a vertex or along a side as long as one is
consistent. When the individuals of the couples are side-by-side
facing in, they look very much like a side of a triangle.

However, I believe the picture of the midpoint between the
individuals of a couple coinciding with a vertex of the triangle
makes it easier to keep the set aligned as an equilateral
triangle--each couple facing the center and facing the space between
the other two couples (all you geometry experts will remember that
the three perpendicular bisectors intersect at the center!). Also,
with the vertex view, when the couples turn BH, their turn is
centered on a vertex (of the inverted triangle). Moreover, when we
speak of progressing to positions around the triangle, it is easier
for me to think of those positions as one of the triangle vertices
rather than the midpoint of a side.

Cheers, Oberdan.

184 Estaban Drive, Camarillo, CA 93010-1611 USA
Voice: (805) 389-0063, FAX: (805) 484-2775, email: ootto@ootto.com

The Wind on Loch Fyne

Message 21699 · Priscilla M. Burrage · 28 Jun 2000 01:53:01 · Top

On Tue, 27 Jun 2000, Peter Hastings wrote in part:

> However all the crispness is lost in doing either of these (alternate,
> easier ways of executing the figure) and so is much of the vigour of the
> dance. John Bowie Dickson was a great champion of vigour in strathspeys
> (and much else in life, forbye) and I'm sure he wrote exactly what he
> wanted to be done. He never wrote a sludgy strathspey in his life.

What a wonderful description of John Bowie Dickson's contribution to
Scottish dancing.

He also believed strongly that, as the reel of four comes from highland
dancing, strathspeys with reels of four should be played faster, as
highland dancing is (but not necessarily as fast as the fastest highland).

Do you observe this distinction? I try to.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Priscilla Burrage Vermont US
(pburrage@zoo.uvm.edu)

The Wind on Loch Fyne

Message 21727 · Jodie Hebert · 28 Jun 2000 18:34:49 · Top

This dance has been a recurring favourite on our demo programs for
years, along with John's explanation of the inspiration for the
dance. Even the older (70 +) members of the group could still
manage the formations as written - it takes cooperation and
everyone knowing where they should be at the end of bar 4, but it
does look lovely and is a joy to dance that way. Peter's
description of "requires strength and preparedness" is accurate,
and so is his comment about John's vigorous strathspeys. A class
with him teaching his own dances was a treat!

BTW, perhaps some of us librarians in the group, used to dropping
initial articles when searching titles in databases, have contributed
to the careless handling of the "The"s...

Cheers, Jodie

Date sent: Tue, 27 Jun 2000 16:46:33 +0100 (BST)
From: Peter Hastings <prh@roe.ac.uk>
To: strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de
Subject: Re: The Wind on Loch Fyne

> This dance does require a certain amount of strength (and
> preparedness) if it is to be danced as written :
> 2 bars to set
> 2 bars to circle half way
> 2 bars to turn partner BH
2 bars to circle half way
>
> This may explain the popularity of the alternatives - circle one place
> rather than half way (which changes the progression but doesn't
> destroy the dance) or move while turning.
>
> However all the crispness is lost in doing either of these and so is
> much of the vigour of the dance. John Bowie Dickson was a great
> champion of vigour in strathspeys (and much else in life, forbye) and
> I'm sure he wrote exactly what he wanted to be done. He never wrote a
> sludgy strathspey in his life.
>
> my $0.02
>
> Peter Hastings
> Royal Observatory
> Edinburgh
> :)
>
>
> --
> Peter Hastings <prh@roe.ac.uk>
>

Jodie Parker-Hebert
McLennan Library, Collections Dept.
McGill University, Montreal, PQ Canada
Voice: 514-398-4782 FAX: 514-398-7184

The Wind on Loch Fyne

Message 21742 · Thomas G. Mungall, III · 28 Jun 2000 23:37:56 · Top

To me there is no more beautiful and stately Scottish Country dance than
"The Wind on Loch Fyne". This has always been one of my most favorite
dances!

Tom Mungall
----- Original Message -----
From: Jodie Hebert <Hebert@library.mcgill.ca>

> This dance has been a recurring favourite on our demo programs for
> years, along with John's explanation of the inspiration for the
> dance.

Wind on Loch Fyne

Message 21694 · hways · 27 Jun 2000 19:49:04 · Top

Anselm Lingnau wrote:

> Also, it's supposed to be *The* Wind on Loch Fyne. I seem to remember
> that the late John Bowie Dickson, who devised the dance, was quite
> particular about this.
>
> Anselm
> --

As we all should be, not just for this dance but for lots of others.
For me the most annoying is a program offering "Hamilton Rant".

Harry

Wind on Loch Fyne

Message 21703 · ron.mackey · 28 Jun 2000 02:48:49 · Top

> Date: Tue, 27 Jun 2000 11:54:10 -0100
> From: harry ways <hways@ix.netcom.com>
> To: strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de
> Subject: Re: Wind on Loch Fyne
> Reply-to: strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de

>
>
> Anselm Lingnau wrote:
>
> > Also, it's supposed to be *The* Wind on Loch Fyne. I seem to remember
> > that the late John Bowie Dickson, who devised the dance, was quite
> > particular about this.
> >
> > Anselm
> > --
>
> As we all should be, not just for this dance but for lots of others.
> For me the most annoying is a program offering "Hamilton Rant".
>
> Harry

Hear, hear. Also The Montgomeries' Rant or The Robertson Rant
Cheers, Ron :)

< 0 Ron Mackey,(Purveyor of Pat's Party Pieces)
'O> Mottingham,
/#\ London. UK.
l>
Ron.Mackey@btinternet.com

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