strathspey Archive: shake and rock step

Previous thread: dancing on grass
Next thread: Wheelchairs

shake and rock step

Message 20673 · Lara D. Friedman~Shedlov · 8 Mar 2000 21:42:51 · Top

I'm looking for Scottish country dances, besides Schiehallion, that use
the shake and rock highland setting step. Anybody have some suggestions?

--Lara Friedman-Shedlov
Minneapolis, MN

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Lara Friedman~Shedlov "Thwart not the librarian!"
ldfs@bigfoot.com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

shake and rock step

Message 20676 · Alan Paterson · 8 Mar 2000 22:35:54 · Top

"Lara D. Friedman~Shedlov" wrote:

> I'm looking for Scottish country dances, besides Schiehallion, that use
> the shake and rock highland setting step. Anybody have some suggestions?

Shepherd's Crook from the McNab collection? Difficult to say if this is a
country dance or Highland,

Alan

shake and rock step

Message 20677 · Norah Link · 8 Mar 2000 22:50:22 · Top

Actually, there is a country dance called Shepherd's Crook as well - nothing
like the step dance, if my memory of a brief look at it some time back
serves. You could use it in Glasgow Highlanders, or in the strathspey
portions of Foursomes (described in the early books, believe it or not).
You could even construct a modified version for dancing in reel time for
Eightsomes (although it is technically a strathspey step, the toe-and-shake
movement is included in the reel setting steps; my recollection is fuzzy,
so there may even be a version already constructed in reel time).

Norah

> -----Original Message-----
> From: Alan Paterson [mailto:alanp@paranor.ch]
> Sent: March 8, 2000 3:36 PM
> To: strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de
> Subject: Re: shake and rock step
>
>
> "Lara D. Friedman~Shedlov" wrote:
>
> > I'm looking for Scottish country dances, besides
> Schiehallion, that use
> > the shake and rock highland setting step. Anybody have
> some suggestions?
>
> Shepherd's Crook from the McNab collection? Difficult to say
> if this is a
> country dance or Highland,
>
> Alan
>
>
> --
> Alan Paterson <alanp@paranor.ch>
>

shake and rock step

Message 20678 · Lara D. Friedman~Shedlov · 8 Mar 2000 22:55:02 · Top

Thanks for the suggestion. Actually I knew about that one, but was hoping
to find something that uses a more traditional 3- or 4-couple set, if
such a dance exists.

--Lara

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Lara Friedman~Shedlov "Thwart not the librarian!"
ldfs@bigfoot.com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

On Wed, 8 Mar 2000, Alan Paterson wrote:

> "Lara D. Friedman~Shedlov" wrote:
>
> > I'm looking for Scottish country dances, besides Schiehallion, that use
> > the shake and rock highland setting step. Anybody have some suggestions?
>
> Shepherd's Crook from the McNab collection? Difficult to say if this is a
> country dance or Highland,
>
> Alan
>
>
> --
> Alan Paterson <alanp@paranor.ch>
>
>

shake and rock step

Message 20679 · AGallamore · 8 Mar 2000 23:02:49 · Top

A few suggestions for using the rocking step.

Shepherd's Crook - 72 bar strathspey for 3 people, the step can be used for the second set of highland setting.

Eightsome Reel - The lady's solo in the middle. (I prefer to perform my Martha Graham interpretive dance of the wind...someone else has done the Macarena.)

Glasgow Highlanders - spice it up after the first few times. It is impressive to observe the lady remain in one spot and the man "courting" her by dancing the Glasgow Highland setting step. (Also, try the bunny hop. It works great with the tune....)

In my personal opinion, the rocking step is suitable for any position where a highland step is required, mainly because it is less strenuous for the dancer, plus trying to do high cuts in a ball gown....not attractive.

See you on the dance floor,

Mr. Sandy Gallamore
Charlotte, NC

shake and rock step

Message 20687 · ron.mackey · 9 Mar 2000 01:08:05 · Top

> A few suggestions for using the rocking step.
>
> Shepherd's Crook - 72 bar strathspey for 3 people, the step can be used for the second set of highland setting.
>
> Eightsome Reel - The lady's solo in the middle. (I prefer to perform my Martha Graham interpretive dance of the wind...someone else has done the Macarena.)
>
> Glasgow Highlanders - spice it up after the first few times. It is impressive to observe the lady remain in one spot and the man "courting" her by dancing the Glasgow Highland setting step. (Also, >
>
> In my personal opinion, the rocking step is suitable for any position where a highland step is required, mainly because it is less strenuous for the dancer, plus trying to do high cuts in a ball gown>
> See you on the dance floor,
>
> Mr. Sandy Gallamore
> Charlotte, NC

One of the problems of doing the rocking step in close proximity
or face to face is the chance of kicking someone when performing the
shake with any vigour.
For this reason and in such circumstances I have taken to doing
the 'change' (or Huntley or Cross the Buckle as you will) which
impinges on no-one's space apart from the standard shedding and is
as neat or as showy as you may require.

Cheers, Ron :)

< 0 Ron Mackey,(Purveyor of Pat's Party Pieces)
'O> Mottingham,
/#\ London. UK.
l>
Ron.Mackey@btinternet.com

shake and rock step

Message 20689 · RuddBaron · 9 Mar 2000 01:10:56 · Top

In a message dated 03/08/2000 1:43:18 PM Central Standard Time,
laradf@alumni.si.umich.edu writes:

<< I'm looking for Scottish country dances, besides Schiehallion, that use
the shake and rock highland setting step. Anybody have some suggestions? >>

--- I sometimes use it for the setting during the Glasgow Highlanders (along
with other fling steps) just because 8 times of doing the GH setting step
gets old.

shake and rock step

Message 20691 · mlbrown · 9 Mar 2000 02:01:15 · Top

Greetings Lara

How about "The Winding Nith" by Jackie Johnstone - 1st Loreburn Book?
(The men dance Rocking, while the Ladies dance Glasgow Highlanders with
Turn.

Malcolm & Helen Brown
Tir-Nan-Og - York (UK)
----- Original Message -----
From: Lara D. Friedman~Shedlov <laradf@alumni.si.umich.edu>
To: <strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de>
Sent: Wednesday, March 08, 2000 8:54 PM
Subject: Re: shake and rock step

> Thanks for the suggestion. Actually I knew about that one, but was hoping
> to find something that uses a more traditional 3- or 4-couple set, if
> such a dance exists.
>
> --Lara
>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Lara Friedman~Shedlov "Thwart not the librarian!"
> ldfs@bigfoot.com
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>
>
> On Wed, 8 Mar 2000, Alan Paterson wrote:
>
> > "Lara D. Friedman~Shedlov" wrote:
> >
> > > I'm looking for Scottish country dances, besides Schiehallion, that
use
> > > the shake and rock highland setting step. Anybody have some
suggestions?
> >
> > Shepherd's Crook from the McNab collection? Difficult to say if this is
a
> > country dance or Highland,
> >
> > Alan
> >
> >
> > --
> > Alan Paterson <alanp@paranor.ch>
> >
> >
>
>

shake and rock step

Message 20692 · hways · 9 Mar 2000 02:58:27 · Top

Lara D. Friedman~Shedlov wrote:
>
> Thanks for the suggestion. Actually I knew about that one, but was hoping
> to find something that uses a more traditional 3- or 4-couple set, if
> such a dance exists.
>
> --Lara

No Rocking Step involved, but you might like Lord MacLay's Reel.

Harry

shake and rock step

Message 20696 · Anselm Lingnau · 9 Mar 2000 10:19:56 · Top

Ron Mackey <ron.mackey@post.btinternet.com> writes:

> One of the problems of doing the rocking step in close proximity =

> or face to face is the chance of kicking someone when performing the =

> shake with any vigour.

The good thing about doing rocking steps vis-=E0-vis Glasgow Highlanders
setting is that when you (as the man) are performing a vigorous shake
with your right foot the lady is actually Glasgow-Highlandering off
towards your left. I find Schiehallion much more dangerous, since
there's a lady doing a petronella turn exactly where your foot should be
during the shake.

Thumbs up for the cross-over step in Glasgow Highlanders, too.

If I may be allowed to plug one of my own dances: `Jack's Delight',
written for Jack R. Campbell, is a S64+R64 medley that contains rocking
steps and has become mildly popular on social programs around here
(which probably speaks more for the difficulty of locating medleys that
have not been done to death (such as Schiehallion, 1314 or Johnnie
Walker) than it does for the dance in itself, although I must admit I
rather like it myself). A description is available off my home page
(follow the link to the Merry Dancers leaflets).

Anselm
-- =

Anselm Lingnau ......................... lingnau@tm.informatik.uni-frankf=
urt.de
All theory is against the freedom of the will; all experience for it.
-- Samuel Johnson, quoted by B=
oswell

shake and rock step

Message 20680 · Hugh Goldie · 8 Mar 2000 23:08:22 · Top

I don't know if this is "kosher" ("R.S.C.D.S.?"), but you could do that
step in Glasgow Highlander's. I think that the side-travelling part of
both steps (G.H. and shake and travel) should go in the same direction.
I believe that George Emmerson showed us how to do this when teaching
G.H. in his class in 1979.

--Hugh

Hugh Goldie Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada
goldie@duke.usask.ca

On Wed, 8 Mar 2000, Lara D. Friedman~Shedlov wrote:

> Thanks for the suggestion. Actually I knew about that one, but was hoping
> to find something that uses a more traditional 3- or 4-couple set, if
> such a dance exists.
>
> --Lara
>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Lara Friedman~Shedlov "Thwart not the librarian!"
> ldfs@bigfoot.com
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

shake and rock step

Message 20681 · Hugh Goldie · 8 Mar 2000 23:14:58 · Top

Oops! I was talking about shake and travel, not shake and
rock. I usually refer to the latter as "the rocking step". However,
shake and travel works fine as I recall.

I haven't danced regularly in five years, but I'm making a come-back. I
used to teach G.H. every year in my class, with lots of variations.

Hugh Goldie Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada
goldie@duke.usask.ca

On Wed, 8 Mar 2000, Hugh Goldie wrote:

> I don't know if this is "kosher" ("R.S.C.D.S.?"), but you could do that
> step in Glasgow Highlander's. I think that the side-travelling part of
> both steps (G.H. and shake and travel) should go in the same direction.
> I believe that George Emmerson showed us how to do this when teaching
> G.H. in his class in 1979.
>
> --Hugh
>
> Hugh Goldie Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada
> goldie@duke.usask.ca

shake and rock step

Message 20726 · ron.mackey · 13 Mar 2000 23:34:35 · Top

>
> I'm looking for Scottish country dances, besides Schiehallion, that use
> the shake and rock highland setting step. Anybody have some suggestions?
>
> --Lara Friedman-Shedlov
> Minneapolis, MN
Hi, Lara

In the early 60s I devised a dance called The Brides Dance.
Square medly Reel & S'pey. I made the top couple the bride and groom
and it finished with all ladies in the centre doing a setting step
facing in to each other and then spinning the men in. They all faced
the bride and danced setting steps and high cuts. They finished in
place by each spinning their partner right and left. The final bow
and curtsey was to the B.& G.
We only danced it a few times and I have been tearing the house
apart trying to find it. No dice.
However, if I find it or alternatively, reconstruct it would you be
interested?

Happy Dancing
Cheers :)

Ron
Ron Mackey. London Branch

Previous thread: dancing on grass
Next thread: Wheelchairs
A Django site.