strathspey Archive: Winter Solstice

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Winter Solstice

Message 19769 · Dianna Shipman · 15 Dec 1999 22:03:59 · Top

Any suggestions for appropriate dances for the Winter Solstice on Dec. 22?
We're dancing that night and I'm making that a "theme" for the evening. One
of our dancers (Marilyn Johnson) pointed out to me that this type solstice
occurs only once in 100 years (see below).

"This year will be the first full moon to occur on the winter solstice,
Dec. 22, commonly called the first day of winter, since a full moon on
the winter solstice occurred in conjunction with a lunar perigee (point
in the moon's orbit that is closest to Earth). . . .

If the weather is clear and there is a snow cover where you live, it is
believed that even car headlights will be superfluous.

On December 21st, 1866, the Lakota Sioux took advantage of this
combination of occurrences and staged a devastating retaliatory ambush
on soldiers in the Wyoming Territory.

(In laymen's terms it will be a super bright full moon, much more than
the usual AND it hasn't happened this way for 133 years! Our ancestors
133 years ago saw this. Our descendants 100 or so years from now will
see this again.)

Remember this will happen December 22, 1999"

Dianna L. Shipman
diannashipman@worldnet.att.net
Dianna L. Shipman, P.C., Attorney at Law
PMB 134, 1436 W. Gray
Houston, TX 77019-4946
web page: http://home.att.net/~diannashipman
phone: 713-522-1212

Winter Solstice

Message 19770 · Melbourne Briscoe · 15 Dec 1999 22:13:21 · Top

I'd say any dance in which you paint yourself blue and dance naked is
probably appropriate.

What's the time and location of the dance? :-)

- Mel

At 02:01 PM 12/15/99 -0600, you wrote:
>Any suggestions for appropriate dances for the Winter Solstice on Dec. 22?
>We're dancing that night and I'm making that a "theme" for the evening. One
>of our dancers (Marilyn Johnson) pointed out to me that this type solstice
>occurs only once in 100 years (see below).
>
>"This year will be the first full moon to occur on the winter solstice,
>Dec. 22, commonly called the first day of winter, since a full moon on
>the winter solstice occurred in conjunction with a lunar perigee (point
>in the moon's orbit that is closest to Earth). . . .
>
>If the weather is clear and there is a snow cover where you live, it is
>believed that even car headlights will be superfluous.
>
>On December 21st, 1866, the Lakota Sioux took advantage of this
>combination of occurrences and staged a devastating retaliatory ambush
>on soldiers in the Wyoming Territory.
>
>(In laymen's terms it will be a super bright full moon, much more than
>the usual AND it hasn't happened this way for 133 years! Our ancestors
>133 years ago saw this. Our descendants 100 or so years from now will
>see this again.)
>
>Remember this will happen December 22, 1999"
>
>
>Dianna L. Shipman
>diannashipman@worldnet.att.net
>Dianna L. Shipman, P.C., Attorney at Law
>PMB 134, 1436 W. Gray
>Houston, TX 77019-4946
>web page: http://home.att.net/~diannashipman
>phone: 713-522-1212
>
>
>

Winter Solstice

Message 19786 · Bryan McAlister · 16 Dec 1999 23:34:16 · Top

In article <3.0.5.32.19991215151308.00aad1f0@pop.mindspring.com>,
Melbourne Briscoe <Mel@Briscoe.com> writes
>I'd say any dance in which you paint yourself blue and dance naked is
>probably appropriate.
In December in the northern hemisphere the paint really isnt
necessary...
Bryan McAlister B Arch RIBA ARIAS
Web page www.bryanmac.demon.co.uk
Mobile phone 07801 793849

Winter Solstice

Message 19787 · Doug Mills · 16 Dec 1999 23:46:10 · Top

Winter Solstice? On Dec 22nd?? You poor fools.

I imagine we will be wearing shorts, jandals and throwing another shrimp on the
barbie. All by the light of the silvery moon.

he he he

Doug Mills
ChCh New Zealand (where the crawfish are jumping)

Dianna Shipman wrote:

> Any suggestions for appropriate dances for the Winter Solstice on Dec. 22?
> We're dancing that night and I'm making that a "theme" for the evening. One
> of our dancers (Marilyn Johnson) pointed out to me that this type solstice
> occurs only once in 100 years (see below).
>

Winter Solstice

Message 19790 · Stella Fogg · 17 Dec 1999 01:01:03 · Top

My jandals clash with my woad.
Stella
>
> I imagine we will be wearing shorts, jandals

Winter Solstice

Message 19792 · SallenNic · 17 Dec 1999 02:09:23 · Top

In a message dated 16/12/1999 2:18:51 pm, you wrote:

<<"Ancient Britons never hit on anything as good as woad to fit on
neck or knees or where you sit on, tailors be you blowed!

...Keith>>

>From "1066 and all that".
Nicolas B.

Winter Solstice

Message 19794 · J. Stewart Cunningham · 17 Dec 1999 02:47:45 · Top

Is that where it comes from. I was taught it round the campfire with the
old 47th Croydon scout troop many moons ago!
SallenNic@aol.com wrote:
>
> In a message dated 16/12/1999 2:18:51 pm, you wrote:
>
> <<"Ancient Britons never hit on anything as good as woad to fit on
> neck or knees or where you sit on, tailors be you blowed!
>
> ...Keith>>
>
> >From "1066 and all that".
> Nicolas B.
>
> --
> SallenNic@aol.com

Winter Solstice

Message 19795 · Norman Dahl · 17 Dec 1999 03:00:59 · Top

6th/18th Wimbledon troop, me
-norman-

PS: sung to the tune of "Men of Harlech", for those who never shivered
around an English Scout campfire.
-n-
---
Norman Dahl
PO Box 578 Lutwyche
QLD 4030, Australia
---
----- Original Message -----
From: Stewart Cunningham <stewartc@bc.sympatico.ca>
To: <strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de>
Sent: Friday, 17 December 1999 11:47
Subject: Re: Winter Solstice

> Is that where it comes from. I was taught it round the campfire with the
> old 47th Croydon scout troop many moons ago!
> SallenNic@aol.com wrote:
> >
> > In a message dated 16/12/1999 2:18:51 pm, you wrote:
> >
> > <<"Ancient Britons never hit on anything as good as woad to fit on
> > neck or knees or where you sit on, tailors be you blowed!
> >
> > ...Keith>>
> >
> > >From "1066 and all that".
> > Nicolas B.
> >
> > --
> > SallenNic@aol.com
>
>

Winter Solstice

Message 19817 · ron.mackey · 18 Dec 1999 01:41:56 · Top

> Is that where it comes from. I was taught it round the campfire with the
> old 47th Croydon scout troop many moons ago!
> SallenNic@aol.com wrote:
> >
> > In a message dated 16/12/1999 2:18:51 pm, you wrote:
> >
> > <<"Ancient Britons never hit on
anything as good as woad to fit on
> > neck or knees or where you sit on,
tailors be you blowed!"

Am I correct in my recollections that it continues:-

Romans keep your armours
Saxons your pyjamas
Hairy coats were made for goats
Gorillas, Yaks, Retriever dogs and Lamas
March up Snowdon with your woad on
Never mind if you get rained or blowed on
Never needs a button sewed on
Go it Ancient Bs

Any more anyone? :))
Cheers, Ron :)

< 0 Ron Mackey,(Purveyor of Pat's Party Pieces)
'O> Mottingham,
/#\ London. UK.
l>
Ron.Mackey@btinternet.com

Winter Solstice - Actually WOAD!

Message 19825 · Ian McHaffie · 18 Dec 1999 15:25:57 · Top

Woad

In response to a request - on a topic intimately connected with SCD!

Ian McHaffie
ianmch@inforamp.net
________________________________________________________________________________
(Tune: Men of Harlech)
What's the use of wearing braces,
Hats or spats or shoes with laces,
Vests and pants you buy in places
Down on Brompton Road?
What's the use of shirts of cotton,
Studs that always get forgotten?
These affairs are simply rotten-
Better f ar is woad.
Woad's the stuff to show men,
Woad to scare your foemen.
Boil it to a brilliant blue
And rub it on your legs and your abdomen
Ancient Britons never hit on
Anything as good as woad to fit on
Neck or knees or where you sit on-
Tailors, you be blowed!

Romans came across the channel
All dressed up in tin and flannel;
Half a pint of woad per man'll
Clothe us more than these.
Saxons, you may save your stitches,
Building beds for bugs in britches;
We have woad to clothe us which is
Not a nest for fleas.
Romans, keep your armors,
Saxons, your pajamas;
Hairy coats were made for goats,
Gorillas, yaks, retriever dogs and llamas.
March on Snowdon with your woad on
Never mind if you get rained or snowed
Never need a button sewed on,
Good for us today!

Winter Solstice - Actually WOAD!

Message 19837 · eclyde · 19 Dec 1999 05:06:58 · Top

Ian:
I sent a copy of your message to an old school chum
who is well versed(!) in these songs. He reports
that your message is not quite correct and,
based on many sing-songs at Scout camps
and elsewhere, offers the following "corrections"
to the second verse.

Eric

----- Original Message -----
From: Ian McHaffie <ianmch@inforamp.net>
To: <strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de>
Sent: Friday, December 17, 1999 8:17 PM
Subject: Re: Winter Solstice - Actually WOAD!

> Woad
>
> In response to a request - on a topic intimately connected with SCD!
>
> Ian McHaffie
> ianmch@inforamp.net
>
____________________________________________________________________________
____
> (Tune: Men of Harlech)
> What's the use of wearing braces,
> Hats or spats or shoes with laces,
> Vests and pants you buy in places
> Down on Brompton Road?
> What's the use of shirts of cotton,
> Studs that always get forgotten?
> These affairs are simply rotten-
> Better f ar is woad.
> Woad's the stuff to show men,
> Woad to scare your foemen.
> Boil it to a brilliant blue
> And rub it on your legs and your abdomen
> Ancient Britons never hit on
> Anything as good as woad to fit on
> Neck or knees or where you sit on-
> Tailors, you be blowed!
>
> Romans came across the channel
> All dressed up in tin and flannel;
> Half a pint of woad per man'll
> Clothe us more than these.
> Saxons, you may save your stitches,
> Building beds for bugs in britches;
> We have woad to clothe us which is
> Not a nest for fleas.
> Romans, keep your armors, (sp: armours!)
> Saxons, your pajamas;
> Hairy coats were made for goats, (meant for)
> Gorillas, yaks, retriever dogs and llamas.
> March on Snowdon with your woad on (up Snowdon)
> Never mind if you get rained or snowed (add "on", to rhyme with
Snowdon))
> Never need a button sewed on,
> Good for us today! (Last line should be "Britons shall be free"
-- to rhyme (more or less!) with
"fleas"
several lines above! )
>
>

Winter Solstice - Actually WOAD!

Message 19841 · SallenNic · 19 Dec 1999 13:40:07 · Top

In a message dated 19/12/1999 3:07:24 am, you wrote:

<<> Good for us today! (Last line should be "Britons shall be free"

-- to rhyme (more or less!) with

"fleas"

several lines above! )>>

I *believe* the last line originally is "Go it, Ancient B's!"
Nicolas B.

Winter Solstice - Actually WOAD!

Message 19842 · Melbourne Briscoe · 19 Dec 1999 15:06:46 · Top

And I learned it from Susie Petrov as "fits us all with ease!"

Ellie Briscoe
Alexandria Va USA
-----Original Message-----
From: SallenNic@aol.com <SallenNic@aol.com>
To: strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de
<strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de>
Date: Sunday, December 19, 1999 06:40
Subject: Re: Re: Winter Solstice - Actually WOAD!

>
>In a message dated 19/12/1999 3:07:24 am, you wrote:
>
><<> Good for us today! (Last line should be "Britons shall be free"
>
> -- to rhyme (more or less!) with
>
>"fleas"
>
> several lines above! )>>
>
>I *believe* the last line originally is "Go it, Ancient B's!"
> Nicolas B.
>
>--
>SallenNic@aol.com
>

Winter Solstice - Actually WOAD!

Message 19844 · Miriam L. Mueller · 19 Dec 1999 20:59:34 · Top

The song - words and music - is in the San Francisco Branch's song book,
along with LOTS of other goodies. Check our website at rscds-sf.org for
contents, more info.

Miriam Mueller - SF

Winter Solstice - Actually WOAD!

Message 19849 · eclyde · 20 Dec 1999 04:24:09 · Top

I just checked the version given in the SF Branch ceilidh songbook
and the last line is definitely wrong. What looks like verse three
is actually the chorus to verse two, and thus the last line should rhyme
(more or less) with "fleas." So I stand by my friend's version
"Britons shall be free!"

Eric Clyde
Ottawa Branch

----- Original Message -----
From: Miriam L. Mueller <mimimueller@juno.com>
To: <strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de>
Sent: Sunday, December 19, 1999 1:05 PM
Subject: Re: Winter Solstice - Actually WOAD!

> The song - words and music - is in the San Francisco Branch's song book,
> along with LOTS of other goodies. Check our website at rscds-sf.org for
> contents, more info.
>
> Miriam Mueller - SF
>
>

Winter Solstice

Message 19908 · Dianna Shipman · 23 Dec 1999 09:19:35 · Top

Tonight we danced the English dance "Winter Solstice" in honor of the
occasion - a very nice dance - and I had an email that a Scottish dance
version of this is in the works. And we enjoyed the beautiful, bright moon
tonight as well.
Dianna
Dianna L. Shipman
diannashipman@worldnet.att.net
Dianna L. Shipman, P.C., Attorney at Law
PMB 134, 1436 W. Gray
Houston, TX 77019-4946
web page: http://home.att.net/~diannashipman
phone: 713-522-1212

Winter Solstice

Message 19771 · Richard L. Walker · 15 Dec 1999 22:29:05 · Top

Be certain to go look at the moon that night. Not only is it the Solstice,
it is one of the few times that the earth will be about as close as it can
get to the moon making it appear much bigger than normal. Another
simultaneous solar event will make it appear much brighter than normal. Put
all that together, and you have an event worthy of a few moments
observation. Have fun. You might set up a goodie table outside (assuming
it isn't pouring) since it should be bright enough to eat by -- at least
with a few candles, hurricane lamps or some other form of old-tyme lighting.
ha ha

Now that I read your entire message, you obviously hit on the high points.
(I didn't see BIGGER though - heh heh)

-----Original Message-----
From: Dianna Shipman [mailto:diannashipman@worldnet.att.net]
Sent: Wednesday, December 15, 1999 2:01 PM
To: Strathspey Articles
Subject: Winter Solstice

Any suggestions for appropriate dances for the Winter Solstice on Dec. 22?
We're dancing that night and I'm making that a "theme" for the evening. One
of our dancers (Marilyn Johnson) pointed out to me that this type solstice
occurs only once in 100 years (see below).

"This year will be the first full moon to occur on the winter solstice,
Dec. 22, commonly called the first day of winter, since a full moon on
the winter solstice occurred in conjunction with a lunar perigee (point
in the moon's orbit that is closest to Earth). . . .

If the weather is clear and there is a snow cover where you live, it is
believed that even car headlights will be superfluous.

On December 21st, 1866, the Lakota Sioux took advantage of this
combination of occurrences and staged a devastating retaliatory ambush
on soldiers in the Wyoming Territory.

(In laymen's terms it will be a super bright full moon, much more than
the usual AND it hasn't happened this way for 133 years! Our ancestors
133 years ago saw this. Our descendants 100 or so years from now will
see this again.)

Remember this will happen December 22, 1999"

Dianna L. Shipman
diannashipman@worldnet.att.net
Dianna L. Shipman, P.C., Attorney at Law
PMB 134, 1436 W. Gray
Houston, TX 77019-4946
web page: http://home.att.net/~diannashipman
phone: 713-522-1212

Winter Solstice

Message 19772 · Dianna Shipman · 15 Dec 1999 22:52:01 · Top

The dance is 7 to 10 pm Wed Dec. 22, Grace Lutheran Church, 2515 Waugh,
Houston, Texas - be glad to have you attend - in your "blue" outfit :-)
Dianna
Dianna L. Shipman
diannashipman@worldnet.att.net
Dianna L. Shipman, P.C., Attorney at Law
PMB 134, 1436 W. Gray
Houston, TX 77019-4946
web page: http://home.att.net/~diannashipman
phone: 713-522-1212
----- Original Message -----
From: Melbourne Briscoe <Mel@Briscoe.com>
To: <strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de>
Sent: Wednesday, December 15, 1999 2:13 PM
Subject: Re: Winter Solstice

> I'd say any dance in which you paint yourself blue and dance naked is
> probably appropriate.
>
> What's the time and location of the dance? :-)
>
> - Mel
>
> At 02:01 PM 12/15/99 -0600, you wrote:
> >Any suggestions for appropriate dances for the Winter Solstice on Dec.
22?
> >We're dancing that night and I'm making that a "theme" for the evening.
One
> >of our dancers (Marilyn Johnson) pointed out to me that this type
solstice
> >occurs only once in 100 years (see below).
> >
> >"This year will be the first full moon to occur on the winter solstice,
> >Dec. 22, commonly called the first day of winter, since a full moon on
> >the winter solstice occurred in conjunction with a lunar perigee (point
> >in the moon's orbit that is closest to Earth). . . .
> >
> >If the weather is clear and there is a snow cover where you live, it is
> >believed that even car headlights will be superfluous.
> >
> >On December 21st, 1866, the Lakota Sioux took advantage of this
> >combination of occurrences and staged a devastating retaliatory ambush
> >on soldiers in the Wyoming Territory.
> >
> >(In laymen's terms it will be a super bright full moon, much more than
> >the usual AND it hasn't happened this way for 133 years! Our ancestors
> >133 years ago saw this. Our descendants 100 or so years from now will
> >see this again.)
> >
> >Remember this will happen December 22, 1999"
> >
> >
> >Dianna L. Shipman
> >diannashipman@worldnet.att.net
> >Dianna L. Shipman, P.C., Attorney at Law
> >PMB 134, 1436 W. Gray
> >Houston, TX 77019-4946
> >web page: http://home.att.net/~diannashipman
> >phone: 713-522-1212
> >
> >
> >
>
> --
> Melbourne Briscoe <Mel@Briscoe.com>
>
>

Winter Solstice

Message 19774 · Mike Mudrey · 16 Dec 1999 02:36:53 · Top

A bit heretical -- how about "Winter Solstice" english country danced to
"Early One Morning" (AABB)
Could dance it as a reel.

Probably a good lead into all the Y2K dances (tandem reels, petronella in
tandem, second couple active (or inactive), etc).

At 02:01 PM 12/15/1999 -0600, you wrote:
>Any suggestions for appropriate dances for the Winter Solstice on Dec. 22?
>We're dancing that night and I'm making that a "theme" for the evening. One
>of our dancers (Marilyn Johnson) pointed out to me that this type solstice
>occurs only once in 100 years (see below).
>
>"This year will be the first full moon to occur on the winter solstice,
>Dec. 22, commonly called the first day of winter, since a full moon on
>the winter solstice occurred in conjunction with a lunar perigee (point
>in the moon's orbit that is closest to Earth). . . .
>
>If the weather is clear and there is a snow cover where you live, it is
>believed that even car headlights will be superfluous.
>
>On December 21st, 1866, the Lakota Sioux took advantage of this
>combination of occurrences and staged a devastating retaliatory ambush
>on soldiers in the Wyoming Territory.
>
>(In laymen's terms it will be a super bright full moon, much more than
>the usual AND it hasn't happened this way for 133 years! Our ancestors
>133 years ago saw this. Our descendants 100 or so years from now will
>see this again.)
>
>Remember this will happen December 22, 1999"
>
>
>Dianna L. Shipman
>diannashipman@worldnet.att.net
>Dianna L. Shipman, P.C., Attorney at Law
>PMB 134, 1436 W. Gray
>Houston, TX 77019-4946
>web page: http://home.att.net/~diannashipman
>phone: 713-522-1212

Mike Mudrey
106 Ravine Road
Mount Horeb, WI53572-1930
608-437-3701

mgmudrey@madison.tds.net

Winter Solstice

Message 19775 · Pia Walker · 16 Dec 1999 11:07:36 · Top

If there's snow in your area: make it fast and quick - especially if you
are dancing outside :>)

I happen to be going to my church ceidlidh (fundraiser for the sunday
school) and will think of all you other people - if I wasn't dancing I
would be sitting at home in front of the fire with a glass of mulled
wine -the best way for celebrating any winter night :>)

Pia

-----Original Message-----
From: Dianna Shipman <diannashipman@worldnet.att.net>
To: Strathspey Articles <strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de>
Date: 15 December 1999 20:08
Subject: Winter Solstice

>Any suggestions for appropriate dances for the Winter Solstice on Dec. 22?
>We're dancing that night and I'm making that a "theme" for the evening.
One
>of our dancers (Marilyn Johnson) pointed out to me that this type solstice
>occurs only once in 100 years (see below).
>
>"This year will be the first full moon to occur on the winter solstice,
>Dec. 22, commonly called the first day of winter, since a full moon on
>the winter solstice occurred in conjunction with a lunar perigee (point
>in the moon's orbit that is closest to Earth). . . .
>
>If the weather is clear and there is a snow cover where you live, it is
>believed that even car headlights will be superfluous.
>
>On December 21st, 1866, the Lakota Sioux took advantage of this
>combination of occurrences and staged a devastating retaliatory ambush
>on soldiers in the Wyoming Territory.
>
>(In laymen's terms it will be a super bright full moon, much more than
>the usual AND it hasn't happened this way for 133 years! Our ancestors
>133 years ago saw this. Our descendants 100 or so years from now will
>see this again.)
>
>Remember this will happen December 22, 1999"
>
>
>Dianna L. Shipman
>diannashipman@worldnet.att.net
>Dianna L. Shipman, P.C., Attorney at Law
>PMB 134, 1436 W. Gray
>Houston, TX 77019-4946
>web page: http://home.att.net/~diannashipman
>phone: 713-522-1212
>
>
>

Winter Solstice

Message 19776 · Keith Grant · 16 Dec 1999 16:18:23 · Top

Melbourne Briscoe wrote:
>
> I'd say any dance in which you paint yourself blue and dance naked is
> probably appropriate.
>
> What's the time and location of the dance? :-)
>
> - Mel
>

Reminds me of songs from Oak, Ash, and Thorn -- a local acapella group that
grew out of the Renaissance Faire and a love of ale. One of their numbers is
a tribute to woad.

"Ancient Britons never hit on anything as good as woad to fit on
neck or knees or where you sit on, tailors be you blowed!

...Keith

--

+--------------------------------------+-----------------------------------+
I Keith Eric Grant I We must remember that everything I
I <keg@strathspey.llnl.gov> I is ordinary and extraordinary. It I
I--------------------------------------I is our minds that either open or I
I Over the hills, but not too far away I close. Details are not good or I
I from the San Francisco East Bay I bad. They are details. -- Natalie I
I I Goldberg, Writing Down the Bones I
+--------------------------------------+-----------------------------------+

Woad

Message 19777 · Peter Hastings · 16 Dec 1999 16:35:02 · Top

For those whose interest has been piqued...

http://merryrose.atlantia.sca.org/archive/1998-01jan/msg00227.html

Peter Hastings
Royal Observatory
Edinburgh
:)

> Reminds me of songs from Oak, Ash, and Thorn -- a local a capella group
> that grew out of the Renaissance Faire and a love of ale. One of their
> numbers is a tribute to woad.
>
> "Ancient Britons never hit on anything as good as woad to fit on neck or
> knees or where you sit on, tailors be you blowed!

Woad

Message 19796 · Keith Grant · 17 Dec 1999 04:13:55 · Top

Peter Hastings wrote:
>
> For those whose interest has been piqued...
>
> http://merryrose.atlantia.sca.org/archive/1998-01jan/msg00227.html
>
> Peter Hastings
> Royal Observatory
> Edinburgh
> :)

Thanks Peter,

I'd posted that this morning with about 5 minutes free time before I had to
go catch A BART train into San Francisco for the annual pre-Christmas
American Geophysical Union Conference. No time for me to give more links and
details, so I'm glad to see that you did.

...Keith

--

+--------------------------------------+-----------------------------------+
I Keith Eric Grant I We must remember that everything I
I <keg@strathspey.llnl.gov> I is ordinary and extraordinary. It I
I--------------------------------------I is our minds that either open or I
I Over the hills, but not too far away I close. Details are not good or I
I from the San Francisco East Bay I bad. They are details. -- Natalie I
I I Goldberg, Writing Down the Bones I
+--------------------------------------+-----------------------------------+

Woad

Message 19799 · Keith Grant · 17 Dec 1999 06:33:46 · Top

Peter Hastings wrote:
>
> For those whose interest has been piqued...
>
> http://merryrose.atlantia.sca.org/archive/1998-01jan/msg00227.html
>

On close inspection I notice the last line on the words at the link above is
given as "Woad for us today!"

Having learned the song in the context of other drinking songs, like "God
Bless the Human Elbow" and [Here's to the] "Barley Mow", the terminating
line that I have been accustomed to is the pun-nishing "Bottoms up for
Woad!"

Those who have led me along this astray path via live song and song-book,
now have a webpage at http://www.oakashthorn.com/

...Keith

--

+--------------------------------------+-----------------------------------+
I Keith Eric Grant I We must remember that everything I
I <keg@strathspey.llnl.gov> I is ordinary and extraordinary. It I
I--------------------------------------I is our minds that either open or I
I Over the hills, but not too far away I close. Details are not good or I
I from the San Francisco East Bay I bad. They are details. -- Natalie I
I I Goldberg, Writing Down the Bones I
+--------------------------------------+-----------------------------------+

Woad

Message 19883 · mlbrown · 21 Dec 1999 22:59:06 · Top

While wondering which film with Bing Crosby and Bob Hope was the ultimate
"Woad" movie, I started to sing quietly to myself -

"On the Woad to Manderlay ........."

I know this is woadfully inadequate, but many thanks to all those writers
who have kept me entertained, and provoked my thoughts this year !

Malcolm

Woad

Message 19884 · hways · 21 Dec 1999 23:45:39 · Top

mlbrown wrote:
I started to sing quietly to myself ->
> "On the Woad to Manderlay ........."

And then he danced "The Winding Woad".

Woad be gone!

Harry

Woad

Message 19888 · StrumMA · 22 Dec 1999 04:49:49 · Top

Then there's the Woad to Lisdoonvarna, Abbey Woad, and Hey! we could all
paint ourselves blue and be Woad Warriors!

Sandy Lafleur
NH

Woad

Message 19890 · Colleen Putt · 22 Dec 1999 06:12:31 · Top

Okay, now I'm flashing back to Pinewoods the year they celebrated the
umpty-hundredth anniversary of Hadrian's Wall. A "wall" of blankets was
strung up with Picts and Scots (suitably woaded, of course) on the one side,
and hoity-toity Romans in togas on the other ("Where's the gin?" "Dextra,
darling!"). A sing-song ensued with each side trying to outdo the other:
"Show me the way to go Rome", "Country Woad, take me home", "Rome, Rome, on
the range", "My Blue Heaven", and back and forth in similar vein. The
highlight was the poor man who drove a milk truck in to make a delivery. He
must have thought he'd wandered into a camp for the mentally challenged,
especially when some woaded individuals "blued" him with glad cries and some
face paint. All of the above, of course, was inspired by the inimitable
Sally Dee's rendition of "Woad" at the ceilidh! Happy days!
Cheers,
Colleen
> mlbrown wrote:
> I started to sing quietly to myself ->
> > "On the Woad to Manderlay ........."
>
> And then he danced "The Winding Woad".
>
> Woad be gone!
>
> Harry
>
>
> --
> hways@ix.netcom.com

Woad

Message 19891 · Carfuffle · 22 Dec 1999 06:18:42 · Top

Looks like we already have a few Woad Scholars.

Nadene Hunter
Dansville, NY, USA

Woad

Message 19906 · hways · 23 Dec 1999 02:48:57 · Top

StrumMA@aol.com wrote:
>
> Then there's the Woad to Lisdoonvarna, Abbey Woad, and Hey! we could all> paint ourselves blue and be Woad Warriors!>
> Sandy Lafleur
> NH
> --
> StrumMA@aol.com

Better put an end to this before we become victims of Woad Rage!

Harry

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