strathspey Archive: cues

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cues

Message 19124 · Melbourne Briscoe · 29 Oct 1999 00:48:58 · Top

Sometimes when dancing I forget what is next; I ask my partner, "what's
next?" I hope for a verbal cue, soon! Sometimes, as first couple, in the
middle of my bow to my partner, I realize I haven't a clue how the dance
starts or goes, so I say to my partner, "Talk to me!" When the dance
finally clicks in (assuming it does), I say, "OK, got it, thanks," and keep
on dancing. In all cases, verbal cues are asked for and given. And I've
given permission for someone to talk to me.

Sometimes I forget to set, or go the wrong way, etc, and I find it very
helpful for someone to say (e.g.), "Mel, reel." Without my name, I wouldn't
know they mean me.

So I distinguish two cases: firstly, I know I need help; secondly, I need
it but don't know it. I suggest the desirable cues are different in these
two cases. In the first case, it can be pretty subtle, because I'm looking
for it, but *need not be so subtle* because I've asked for it. In the
latter case, it can't be *too* subtle or it will be missed, but it must be
subtle so it is not embarassing.

The last word above is important. All cues must be given so they are
non-judgemental and non-embarassing to the recipient. Thus, a verbal cue
is just fine so long as it is given in a helpful, smiling, one-on-one way,
and given so no one else can hear.

Finally, one should make the judgement as to whether an error about to
occur, or in progress, or which just happened, makes much difference. If
someone turns by the left and casts instead of turning by the right, does
it destroy the dance? If not, maybe it's best to just let it go. I've
often watched a couple go through the dance once, realize they ended on
wrong sides, looked coufused, and asked "What went wrong?" If a simple
answer will suffice (like, cross at the top at the end of the reel) then
give it, because their enjoyment will be enhanced. If they don't ask for
help, let them finish on the wrong side! Better that than shouting and
pushing.

Bottom line:
Be subtle, be non-judgemental, and maybe just be quiet.

- Mel
Virginia, USA

Corrective cueing as a threat to society

Message 19131 · Peter Hastings · 29 Oct 1999 11:56:30 · Top

> All cues must be given so they are non-judgemental

All cues are judgemental - someone judges that you need help and
offers you it. You may either accept it gracefully or not. If the
help was not required or (as sometimes happens incorrect) you can
ignore it, perhaps pausing to consider why it _appeared_ to be
necessary.

> ...and non-embarassing to the recipient.

So help may only be offered by someone who knows you well enough
to know if you'll be embarassed, irrespective of whether or not
you are about to louse up the dance they are taking part in ?

I have _never_ encountered cueing in which help was offered with
the intention of embarassing the recipient. Teasing between good
friends is another matter...

Whether the recipient is embarassed or not is their problem, no
one elses's.

> Thus, a verbal cue is just fine so long as it is given in a helpful,
> smiling, one-on-one way,

Of course.

> and given so no one else can hear.

So that those whose hearing is not 100% may not be helped - except
in a non-verbal manner which, as seems to have been agreed, is not
always appropriate.

SUMMARY

Sometimes all of us need help.

It may be offered in ways that the _helper_ thinks is most
appropriate.

If it does not suit, tough.

Help may be offered when it is not needed.

Unless and until etiquette and control is seriously tightened up
in this activity, unwanted help may be offered.

Of course, rigorous briefing immediately before each dance will
remove all need for help and this problem disappears. Right...

It's only dancing, for crying out loud.

Peter Hastings
Royal Observatory
Edinburgh
(:

Corrective cueing as a threat to society

Message 19157 · SallenNic · 30 Oct 1999 02:07:50 · Top

A very balanced summary - congratulations, Peter Hastings.
Nicolas B., Lanark.

cues

Message 19133 · Ian Brown · 29 Oct 1999 13:04:12 · Top

Hi come on Mel!
Did you really mean to say that you give someone permission to talk to
you?
I am having a bit of a struggle relating this conversation to what I see
happening and what I enjoy. I except demonstration dancing, which I don't
think I am good at and don't particularly enjoy doing. The dancing I do,
I do for fun. Sometimes this is in a club of, typically, three sets of
mixed experience and ability, sometimes in informal dances and sometimes
in formal balls.
I both give and receive help. Sometimes this is verbal and sometimes not.
Sometimes it is accurate and helpful, sometimes not. Often more
knowledgeable dancers have withheld advice (perhaps choked back) that
they wisely judged I would not benefit from at the time and I take your
point that some errors can easily be lived with - right or left hand, I'd
rather get it correct but I'd rather not be corrected by a yell in the
middle of a Highland Ball from another set. That for me has always seemed
the essence - the help needs to be appropriate to the circumstances.
When I've given help people, particularly beginners, have often thanked
me. Particularly, I notice, when the help is accurate! Maybe others have
resented my help and, if so, I'm sorry and will try to refrain if they
let me know.
Maybe others have wanted to talk to me and are waiting for my permission.
If so I gladly give it (and apologise for teasing, Mel).
On a different note, our club has recently been joined by two new dancers
- young language teachers from France and Germany. Complete beginners,
their presence must have halved the average age of our dancers and we
would like to maintain their interest. Can anyone enlighten me on the
extent of Scottish country dancing in France and Germany, particularly
amongst the young? I know that we have some enthusiastic participants in
Strathspey. Has anyone a picture of the extent of dancing in the two
countries?
Regards
Ian Brown
Harrogate

cues

Message 19134 · Anselm Lingnau · 29 Oct 1999 13:31:04 · Top

Ian Brown <ianb@cktec.co.uk> writes:

> Can anyone enlighten me on the
> extent of Scottish country dancing in France and Germany, particularly
> amongst the young? I know that we have some enthusiastic participants in
> Strathspey. Has anyone a picture of the extent of dancing in the two
> countries?

I don't know much about the situation in France, but here in Germany SCD
is a reasonably popular pastime. Not as popular as playing soccer, choir
singing or collecting stamps, of course, but more popular than bungee
jumping (I think).

The current address list contains 56 groups all over Germany, most of
which offer weekly classes. They cover most of the western and southern
part of the country; there are obvious gaps in former East Germany (but
we're working on them). Many of these groups are fairly new, as in `less
than ten years old'. You can get an idea of the geographical
distribution by looking at `http://www.celtic-circle.de/', selecting
`Gruppen' from the menu at the top of the page and clicking on Germany
in the map which will appear shortly afterwards.

Hereabouts, the average age of dancers is, on the whole, considerably
lower than, e.g., in Scotland. Many of the German groups are affiliated
with universities or recruit most of their dancers in universities
(OTOH, childrens' groups are comparatively few and far between),
although most of these are also open to more `mature' dancers. The
audience is mostly German, with a certain number of expatriate Scots as
well as people from other countries. The general level of activitiy is
such that it starts to become difficult to find otherwise unoccupied
week-ends for functions or workshops, at least in the main season from
October to May/June.

It is hard to say just what entices German students to take up Scottish
dancing. We haven't figured it out, either, but we like it!

Anselm
--
Anselm Lingnau ......................... lingnau@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de
Being defeated is often a temporary condition. Giving up is what makes it
permanent. -- Marilyn vos Savant

cues

Message 19135 · Norman Dahl · 29 Oct 1999 14:08:58 · Top

I have to share Ian's alarm at some of the things that have been said in
this thread.

I would class myself (using criteria from a previous thread) as a Beginner
with 8 years experience (meaning: I don't look at my feet, but I worry the
rest of the set). I am, therefore, more often hinted at than hinting.

In either event, though, it's a question of courtesy. People hint at me
because they think (for whatever reason, usually several) that I need it. If
they're right, I'm grateful; if they're wrong, I'm graceful.

By the same token, if I think my partner needs help from me, I will hint by
whatever means I hope will be effective. If it works, fine; if it doesn't,
she's still my partner.

As Peter Hastings said "It's only dancing, for crying out loud."

-norman-

---
Norman Dahl
PO Box 578 Lutwyche
QLD 4030, Australia
---
----- Original Message -----
From: Ian Brown <ianb@cktec.co.uk>
To: <strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de>
Sent: Saturday, 30 October 1999 2:59
Subject: RE: cues (was: unidentified subject)

>
> Hi come on Mel!
> Did you really mean to say that you give someone permission to talk to
> you?
> I am having a bit of a struggle relating this conversation to what I see
> happening and what I enjoy. I except demonstration dancing, which I don't
> think I am good at and don't particularly enjoy doing. The dancing I do,
> I do for fun. Sometimes this is in a club of, typically, three sets of
> mixed experience and ability, sometimes in informal dances and sometimes
> in formal balls.
> I both give and receive help. Sometimes this is verbal and sometimes not.
> Sometimes it is accurate and helpful, sometimes not. Often more
> knowledgeable dancers have withheld advice (perhaps choked back) that
> they wisely judged I would not benefit from at the time and I take your
> point that some errors can easily be lived with - right or left hand, I'd
> rather get it correct but I'd rather not be corrected by a yell in the
> middle of a Highland Ball from another set. That for me has always seemed
> the essence - the help needs to be appropriate to the circumstances.
> When I've given help people, particularly beginners, have often thanked
> me. Particularly, I notice, when the help is accurate! Maybe others have
> resented my help and, if so, I'm sorry and will try to refrain if they
> let me know.
> Maybe others have wanted to talk to me and are waiting for my permission.
> If so I gladly give it (and apologise for teasing, Mel).
> On a different note, our club has recently been joined by two new dancers
> - young language teachers from France and Germany. Complete beginners,
> their presence must have halved the average age of our dancers and we
> would like to maintain their interest. Can anyone enlighten me on the
> extent of Scottish country dancing in France and Germany, particularly
> amongst the young? I know that we have some enthusiastic participants in
> Strathspey. Has anyone a picture of the extent of dancing in the two
> countries?
> Regards
> Ian Brown
> Harrogate
>
>
> --
> Ian Brown <ianb@cktec.co.uk>
>
>

cues

Message 19142 · Priscilla M. Burrage · 29 Oct 1999 18:22:58 · Top

On Fri, 29 Oct 1999, Norman Dahl wrote:

> I have to share Ian's alarm at some of the things that have been said in
> this thread.

Come on now! The original request was from Bruce ans it was to give how
you reacted, how you responded, what you would like in the way of helpful
cues re what the next movement was -- or the whole dance. He didn't
restrict his request in theat fashion.

He did, however, ask that we give illustrations that actually happened to
us. All these comments like "You couldn't possibly have reacted like
that" are not helpful. Obviously, the person was being honest -- don't
tell them that's not how they should react or tell the world that it's
just too bad if they react that way.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Priscilla Burrage Vermont US
(pburrage@zoo.uvm.edu)

cues

Message 19163 · Martin.Sheffield · 30 Oct 1999 12:46:40 · Top

>
>As Peter Hastings said "It's only dancing, for crying out loud."

What do you mean "only" ?

Logically, anyone who is stupid enough to take part in SCD when likely to
make a mistake, deserves to be shouted at, pushed and shoved into the
appropriate place, to receive frowns, scowls, slaps, and be challenged to
duels. To the death.

We should have no hesitation about sacrificing the feelings of this
less-than-perfect interloper to the superior needs of the seven other
RSCDS-trained dancers in the set.

How squeamish some of you are about helping!

Martin, the ogre of Grenoble.

cues

Message 19166 · Pia Walker · 30 Oct 1999 14:41:45 · Top

Oy! you forgot the cattle pronge - or is cattle a dirty word in your part of
the world now? - (sorry)

There is also another kind of torture: They will have to do it again or
watch it on video!!!!! - now there's a good one - let's all get videoed and
then have it shown at summer-school or the AGM or something - with comments.
We could start a focus group: How to comment on mistakes. - We could also
assess mistakes - have a prelim - and fully certificated fools class - where
it wouldn't be passing the test but failing it which would be the most
important, and the exam would have to be in public.

love the comments Martin

bye for now

Pia

>>As Peter Hastings said "It's only dancing, for crying out loud."
>
>What do you mean "only" ?
>
>Logically, anyone who is stupid enough to take part in SCD when likely to
>make a mistake, deserves to be shouted at, pushed and shoved into the
>appropriate place, to receive frowns, scowls, slaps, and be challenged to
>duels. To the death.
>
>We should have no hesitation about sacrificing the feelings of this
>less-than-perfect interloper to the superior needs of the seven other
>RSCDS-trained dancers in the set.
>
>How squeamish some of you are about helping!
>
>Martin, the ogre of Grenoble.
>
>--
>M Sheffield <martin.sheffield@wanadoo.fr>
>
>

cues

Message 19169 · mlbrown · 30 Oct 1999 22:23:20 · Top

Greetings;

One of the things that can be really irritating is getting a less experienced
person up, knowing that all they need is a little calm guidance, and just as you
enter the critical part of the dance the M.C. appears just outside your set and
starts telling your partner what to do. The only cue so far found to work in
this situation is to say the M.C.s name in a loud, astonished, if not aggresive,
way!
This definitely ranks ahead of getting up for a dance you rarely do, having a
momentary blank spot, which is then followed by some kind person telling you
what to do every 8 bars for the rest of the dance! That is not to say that it
isn't annoying!

Helen

This was written by Malcolm and then shown to me!

(Well you should have heard her moan at the time)

cues

Message 19174 · ron.mackey · 31 Oct 1999 02:40:06 · Top

> From: Ian Brown <ianb@cktec.co.uk>

>
> Hi come on Mel!
> Did you really mean to say that you give someone permission to talk to
> you?
> I am having a bit of a struggle relating this conversation to what I see
> happening and what I enjoy. I except demonstration dancing, which I don't
> think I am good at and don't particularly enjoy doing. The dancing I do,
> I do for fun. Sometimes this is in a club of, typically, three sets of
> mixed experience and ability, sometimes in informal dances and sometimes
> in formal balls.

Hi, Ian
Why do you think you are not good at demonstration dancing? Is it
because your image of the Dem. is great technique and poise that one
sees at St A. or do you not like standing up in public and showing
viewers what you enjoy doing?
I am interested in what dancers feel is necessary to be a Dem.
dancer. Many of the local Dem. teams one can describe as competent
without being unkind or causing offence. They just enjoy dancing so
much they want others to see what fun they have. I have seen very
few with high technique or superb footwork and most do not aspire to
such but they will demonstrate to the Seniors in the local Hospice
with great good will and humour any time they are asked.
So, friends, the question is:-
_ Why do you Demonstrate - or not?_


Cheers, Ron :)

< 0 Ron Mackey,(Purveyor of Pat's Party Pieces)
'O> Mottingham,
/#\ London. UK.
l>
Ron.Mackey@btinternet.com

cues

Message 19176 · James R. Ferguson · 31 Oct 1999 03:12:08 · Top

I've been reading this discussion with interest, and I think the one statement
which really caught my eye was the one below. Sound thinking, and a way to keep
things on a peaceful keel in the set.
Donna

Norman Dahl wrote:

> In either event, though, it's a question of courtesy. People hint at me
> because they think................ that I need it. If
> they're right, I'm grateful; if they're wrong, I'm graceful.
>

cues

Message 19177 · Dianna Shipman · 31 Oct 1999 09:01:02 · Top

or not -
the dem teams in the past (as far as I know there isn't one at present) -
the person(s) in charge likes to pick extremely complicated dances - with
few practices - and have made it clear they want no input from dancers in
selecting dances or anything else (it's not a democracy) and they will make
all decisions - including what the dancers will wear - I've attended some of
these as an audience member and often the dancers have pained expressions as
they're struggling to remember how the dance goes - too much stress for me -
and I then wonder who the organizer is trying to impress - the audience?
(they don't seem to like this type of demo) - the dancers obviously aren't
having a good time - or maybe just other teachers? I've never understood it.

I have occasionally participated in (or even helped organize) informal demos
where the purpose is either (1) to attract new members or (2) as a public
service - we pick easy dances and/or ones everyone already knows - and see
how much fun we can have with it.

Dianna

Dianna L. Shipman
diannashipman@worldnet.att.net
Dianna L. Shipman, P.C., Attorney at Law
PMB 134, 1436 W. Gray
Houston, TX 77019-4946
web page: http://home.att.net/~diannashipman
phone: 713-522-1212
----- Original Message -----
From: <ron.mackey@post.btinternet.com>
To: <strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de>
Sent: Saturday, October 30, 1999 5:40 PM
Subject: RE: cues (was: unidentified subject)

> > From: Ian Brown <ianb@cktec.co.uk>
>
>
> >
> > Hi come on Mel!
> > Did you really mean to say that you give someone permission to talk to
> > you?
> > I am having a bit of a struggle relating this conversation to what I see
> > happening and what I enjoy. I except demonstration dancing, which I
don't
> > think I am good at and don't particularly enjoy doing. The dancing I do,
> > I do for fun. Sometimes this is in a club of, typically, three sets of
> > mixed experience and ability, sometimes in informal dances and sometimes
> > in formal balls.
>
> Hi, Ian
> Why do you think you are not good at demonstration dancing? Is it
> because your image of the Dem. is great technique and poise that one
> sees at St A. or do you not like standing up in public and showing
> viewers what you enjoy doing?
> I am interested in what dancers feel is necessary to be a Dem.
> dancer. Many of the local Dem. teams one can describe as competent
> without being unkind or causing offence. They just enjoy dancing so
> much they want others to see what fun they have. I have seen very
> few with high technique or superb footwork and most do not aspire to
> such but they will demonstrate to the Seniors in the local Hospice
> with great good will and humour any time they are asked.
> So, friends, the question is:-
> _ Why do you Demonstrate - or not?_
>
>
> Cheers, Ron :)
>
> < 0 Ron Mackey,(Purveyor of Pat's Party Pieces)
> 'O> Mottingham,
> /#\ London. UK.
> l>
> Ron.Mackey@btinternet.com
>

cues

Message 19216 · Steve Wyrick · 2 Nov 1999 08:52:57 · Top

ron.mackey@post.btinternet.com wrote:

> I am interested in what dancers feel is necessary to be a Dem.
> dancer. Many of the local Dem. teams one can describe as competent
> without being unkind or causing offence. They just enjoy dancing so
> much they want others to see what fun they have. I have seen very
> few with high technique or superb footwork and most do not aspire to
> such but they will demonstrate to the Seniors in the local Hospice
> with great good will and humour any time they are asked.
> So, friends, the question is:-
> _ Why do you Demonstrate - or not?_

I ask myself that question before every performance! I'm not much of a
performer; I'm pretty shy and get stage fright easily. I'm not a great
dancer but I do an adequate job. I originally agreed to join our demo group
when asked because I wanted to improve my dancing technique and thought this
would be a good way to get a lot of extra instruction from my teacher (which
it was!). I keep performing, even though I'm still not happy with my
ability, because even though it's scary getting up in front of an audience,
it can also be a lot of fun. I enjoy the cameraderie of the group, and get a
lot of satisfaction from doing a dance well and/or entertaining people
(sometimes the audiences have been entertained by my mistakes). I also hope
that I'm helping to increase awareness of SCD, and hopefully getting more
people involved in folk dancing. -Steve
--
Steve Wyrick <sjwyrick@earthlink.net> -- Concord, CA

cues

Message 19219 · Pia Walker · 2 Nov 1999 10:21:10 · Top

I keep performing, even though I'm still not happy with my
>ability, because even though it's scary getting up in front of an audience,
>it can also be a lot of fun. I enjoy the cameraderie of the group, and get
a
>lot of satisfaction from doing a dance well and/or entertaining people
>(sometimes the audiences have been entertained by my mistakes).

I also hope
>that I'm helping to increase awareness of SCD, and hopefully getting more
>people involved in folk dancing. -Steve

Steve
I think there is an exhibitionist lurking underneath - all "performers" get
"scared" - its chemistry - the adrenaline starting - I for one cannot
remember what I am supposed to be doing - I have to walk and walk the dances
through a million times - (sometimes I cannot remember what I am supposed
to be doing when I'm doing it - yes it is highly entertaining) - and you
seem to have the right kind of spirit.

Keep up the good work

Pia

>--
>Steve Wyrick <sjwyrick@earthlink.net> -- Concord, CA
>
>
>

cues

Message 19347 · Ian Brockbank · 12 Nov 1999 15:59:44 · Top

Hi Ron,

> _ Why do you Demonstrate - or not?_

A chance to show off. A chance to share our wonderful art form with
people who might never otherwise come in contact with it. An
incentive to keep my technique up to scratch. A way to raise money
for the Society or club on whose behalf I am demonstrating.

Any or all of the above, depending on the occasion.

Cheers,

Ian
--
Ian Brockbank, Indigo Active Vision Systems, The Edinburgh Technopole,
Bush Loan, Edinburgh EH26 0PJ Tel: 0131-475-7234 Fax: 0131-475-7201
work: ian@indigo-avs.com personal: Ian.Brockbank@bigfoot.com
web: ScottishDance@bigfoot.com http://www.scottishdance.net/
Feed the World http://www.hungersite.com/

RE:demos

Message 19344 · Martin.Sheffield · 12 Nov 1999 12:31:40 · Top

> So, friends, the question is:-
> _ Why do you Demonstrate - or not?_

A bit late in answering, perhaps, but a few days away from home, and
there's a lot of catching up to do.

Today, I'll say, we do not put on shows.
We used to, because we were asked to by the town council that lent the hall
for our weekly meetings, because an old people's home wanted some
entertainment, because we thought we'd get some new recruits -- all the
usual reasons.

Why the change? Why have we stopped?

Because of the split demos can cause in an otherwise friendly cohesive
group of people.
You have those that can and are willing, those that can but don't want to,
those that can't and won't, and the problem group that can't but will take
part anyway.

Deciding who should dance and who should not is the first obvious cause of
ill feeling (so we let everyone take part that wanted to).
Then there may be the resentment of those that won't be demonstrating and
have to sit out, while the "chosen few" are practising. Or find themselves
practising demo dances that they have no wish to learn.

I now tend to find excuses (the date doesn't suit us, not enough dancers
available, etc) and conceal my real reasons (the dancers aren't good enough
(!), it's a waste of time and energy).

In the 20 years I have been leading dance groups in France, I know of
exactly two people that have come to join one of the groups after seeing us
dance in public.
That's a pretty poor return for the investment. Members of the audience
will tell us how interesting, what fun, how graceful etc,
"Then come and join us," -- "Oh no, much too difficult for me!" or some
other excuse.

What amazes me most is the keenness of so many people to show off in
public, however poor their standard of dancing and their memory. And the
way that even competent dancers suddenly lose their memory for even
well-practised dances when subject to public scrutiny.

I also think that an SCD demo can only be appreciated by SCdancers. The
general public has no appreciation of grace of footwork, precision of
timing, geometrical harmony of figures. The one thing they do appreciate,
fortunately, is our obvious enjoyment while dancing together.
Martin,
in Grenoble, France.
---
http://perso.wanadoo.fr/scots.in.france/
(dancing, dances, cycling ...)

RE:demos

Message 19398 · Priscilla M. Burrage · 16 Nov 1999 18:44:42 · Top

On Fri, 12 Nov 1999, M Sheffield wrote:

> > So, friends, the question is:-
> > _ Why do you Demonstrate - or not?_

> In the 20 years I have been leading dance groups in France, I know of
> exactly two people that have come to join one of the groups after seeing us
> dance in public.

I regret that I stayed away from trying Scottish dancing for two years
because I watched a demonstration. They looked so terrified dancing that
I decided it couldn't be fun.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Priscilla Burrage Vermont US
(pburrage@zoo.uvm.edu)

RE:demos

Message 19426 · Martin.Sheffield · 17 Nov 1999 17:12:51 · Top

I wrote:
>> I know of
>> exactly two people that have come to join one of the groups after seeing us
>> dance in public.

Priscilla replied:
> I stayed away from trying Scottish dancing for two years
>because I watched a demonstration. They looked so terrified dancing that
>I decided it couldn't be fun.

I think I can confidently say this was not the reason our audiences were
discouraged -- the one comment we always earned was "You certainly seem to
be enjoying yourselves."
The other was usually: " but it would be far too difficult for me."
I sometimes wondered if the unspoken comment was: "You won't get me
capering around in a skirt !"
Martin,
in Grenoble, France.
---
http://perso.wanadoo.fr/scots.in.france/
(dancing, dances, cycling ...)

RE:demos

Message 19446 · John P. McClure · 18 Nov 1999 01:07:26 · Top

I haven't been following all of this thread, so may be repeating others.
Anyhow, I do want to say that my wife and I took up SCD _because_ of dems
we had seen. That was quite a while ago, and I have no very specific
memory of the dems; however, apparently, they looked like something we
wanted to do - or, at least, something Lynn wanted to do (she was the main
mover). It was more than 10 years after those dems that we saw an article
in the local paper about the local branch; we had the leisure time available
then, the memory of the dems kicked in, and ...

Happy dancing (as they say),

Peter McClure
Winnipeg, MB

cues

Message 19151 · Trans Vector Technologies, Inc · 30 Oct 1999 00:45:06 · Top

>[Mel:] Bottom line:
>Be subtle, be non-judgemental, and maybe just be quiet.

corrolary: too little is probably better than too much.

Cheers, Oberdan.

Trans Vector Technologies, Inc, 184 Estaban Drive, Camarillo, CA 93010-1611
Phone: (805)484-2775, FAX: (805)484-2718, EMail: ootto@tvt.com

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