strathspey Archive: Buzz Spins in 1783?

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Buzz Spins in 1783?

Message 17808 · John Wood · 29 Jun 1999 16:24:22 · Top

Hi, Folks:

Please forgive my intrusion with a question that does not apply to SCD.
I have been
trying [so far without success] to ascertain from many sources when
"buzz spins" were first danced.

It is just possible that one of you know the answer to this piece of
trivia and your
comment would be welcome.

This relates to whether or not this figure could have been the way spins
were done
in 1776 to 1790 -- if they were done at all in this period.

Hoping for a definitive answer

Regards, John
Bedford, Nova Scotia

Buzz Spins in 1783?

Message 17811 · Priscilla M. Burrage · 29 Jun 1999 17:15:50 · Top

On Tue, 29 Jun 1999, John Wood wrote:

> Please forgive my intrusion with a question that does not apply to SCD.
> I have been
> trying [so far without success] to ascertain from many sources when
> "buzz spins" were first danced.
>
> This relates to whether or not this figure could have been the way spins
> were done
> in 1776 to 1790 -- if they were done at all in this period.

They weren't even done in American squares and contras until after WWII.
The swings were what we would call a 'walk around' movement.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Priscilla Burrage Vermont US
(pburrage@zoo.uvm.edu)

Buzz Spins in 1783?

Message 17813 · Benjamin Stein · 29 Jun 1999 19:07:25 · Top

Sorry-this is one time where I disagree with Priscilla. I started "countr=
y
style" square dancing in the winter of 1938-39 in upstate New York (thoug=
h
not the part of upstate New York that Priscilla came from) and I started
with Buzz step swinging, as was the case with the swinging in the dances
held by Ralph Page in Boston around 1940. It was, however, done to much
slower music than that used today and where the fast music was used the
swings were "walking step" swings with the step on every alternate beat. =
It
somewhat depended on where you came from. The southern mountain dances th=
at
I learned in the early 1940's from Margo Mayo, who was brought up in the
Kentucky mountains, always used a walk swing.

Ben Stein
Burlington Vt USA
dancers@compuserve.com

Buzz Spins in 1783?

Message 17815 · Miriam L. Mueller · 29 Jun 1999 19:47:42 · Top

Regular swing not until after WWII? I was taught the "classic" swing when
I was a child in the late "30's and early '40's, by adults who did it
that way.
In 1945 I remember attending a village square dance (western Mass.,
Berkshires) where the buzz swing was done by everyone. Since you're in
that neighborhood and report the walk-around swing, we're probably honing
in on the start of buzz-swing popularity. I learned my square dancing in
NYC, so it might have started near there - as a "twiddle?"
Miriam (SF)

Buzz Spins in 1783?

Message 17817 · Norah Link · 29 Jun 1999 20:08:32 · Top

Okay, I think it's time for one of the non-SCDers to please explain the difference
between (a) a Buzz Swing (b) a walked swing and (c) a Tulloch turn (other than
handing). Without my Flett & Flett handy, I can't quote the date the Reel of
Tulloch came into being, but late 18thC/ early 19thC sticks in my mind. Whether
the pivot turn was a unique movement at the time is out of my realm.

regards,

Norah Link (Montreal)

Buzz Spins in 1783?

Message 17819 · Priscilla M. Burrage · 29 Jun 1999 20:36:34 · Top

On Tue, 29 Jun 1999, Miriam L. Mueller wrote:

> Regular swing not until after WWII? I was taught the "classic" swing when
> I was a child in the late "30's and early '40's, by adults who did it
> that way.

I surrender. I learned square dancing from people who came out of the
hollows to dance once a week. We did not take our partners in ballroom
position and propel ourselves round each other with nearer (right)
feetside by side and outer feet (left) making a paddling motion to move us
round each other. Instead we used the same hold, but we picked up each
foot in turn and "walked" in a little circle round each other.

> In 1945 I remember attending a village square dance (western Mass.,
> Berkshires) where the buzz swing was done by everyone. Since you're in
> that neighborhood and report the walk-around swing, we're probably honing
> in on the start of buzz-swing popularity.

I grew up on the western side of the Catskills, the northmost section of
what we call Appalachia (= been poor since the eighteenth century).
That's one mountain range and wide river from your western Mass.

> I learned my square dancing in
> NYC, so it might have started near there - as a "twiddle?"

A wild guess on my part: it came about because some square dancers went
to a folk festival and saw another ethnic culture doing the footwork.
That certainly is how the hand-on-wrist hands across (star) started.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Priscilla Burrage Vermont US
(pburrage@zoo.uvm.edu)

Buzz Spins in 1783?

Message 17821 · SMiskoe · 30 Jun 1999 01:03:15 · Top

Richard Neville's book says that Henry Ford utilized Victorian era dances for
his revival of squar dancing and has an illustration of The Swing, where the
couple is definitely using a buzz step. Unfortunately the folks with the
most accurate answers aren't available just now.
Cheers,
Sylvia Miskoe, concord, NH USA

Buzz Spins in 1783?

Message 17878 · Dianna Shipman · 3 Jul 1999 20:36:18 · Top

Are "buzz spins" the same as the "buzz step" used in International Folk
dancing (where one foot is stationery and the other is used sort of like a
paddle to push yourself around?).

Also, I just got back from a trip to Philadelphia and picked up an
interesting book there that collects "country dances" during the
revolutionery war period and also bought two CD's - several dance
descriptions/music are the same or similar to some of our Scottish Country
dances.

Dianna
Dianna L. Shipman
diannashipman@worldnet.att.net
Dianna L. Shipman, P.C., Attorney at Law
1436 W.Gray, #134
Houston, TX 77019-4946
web page: http://home.att.net/~diannashipman
phone: 713-522-1212
----- Original Message -----
From: John Wood <johnwood@accesscable.net>
To: strathspey <strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de>
Sent: Tuesday, June 29, 1999 7:23 AM
Subject: Buzz Spins in 1783?

> Hi, Folks:
>
> Please forgive my intrusion with a question that does not apply to SCD.
> I have been
> trying [so far without success] to ascertain from many sources when
> "buzz spins" were first danced.
>
> It is just possible that one of you know the answer to this piece of
> trivia and your
> comment would be welcome.
>
> This relates to whether or not this figure could have been the way spins
> were done
> in 1776 to 1790 -- if they were done at all in this period.
>
> Hoping for a definitive answer
>
> Regards, John
> Bedford, Nova Scotia
>
>
>
>
> --
> John Wood <johnwood@accesscable.net>
>
>

Buzz Spins in 1783?

Message 17879 · SMiskoe · 4 Jul 1999 02:31:31 · Top

A buzz spin is the same asa buzz step, which is used in the swing for New
England contra and square dancing.
There are a modest number of dances still done today that have their roots in
SCD. quick examples are: Petronella, Hulls' Victory (Scottish Reform) and
Money Musk.
Cheers,
Sylvia Miskoe, Concord, NH USA

SCD Celebrating Alexandria VA's 250th Anniversary

Message 17822 · John K. Andrews · 30 Jun 1999 02:08:17 · Top

The Northern Virginia Branch/RSCDS and the City of Alexandria, Virginia
invite you to a Scottish Country Dance celebrating the 250th anniversary of
the founding of Alexandria (1749-1999). The dance will be held at the
Durant Recreation Center, 1605 Cameron St., Alexandria, VA at 8:00 pm on
Friday, July 23, 1999 (the evening before the Virginia Scottish Games).
Music will be provided by Tersichore (Elke Baker - fiddle and Liz Donaldson
- piano). Admission for dancers is $12.00, spectators - free.

The 18th Century:
Espie McNabb 32J3 MMMI
Jimmy's Fancy 32S3 Bk 14
West's Hornpipe 32R4 5 Trad.
Birks on Invermay 32S3 Bk 16
Over the Water to Charlie 32J3 Bk 34
(new way)
Glasgow Lasses 32S2 Bk 34
General Stuart's Reel 32R3 Bk 10

The 20th Century:
A Reel for Everyone 32R4
Postie's Jig 32J4 Ormskirk
The Gentleman 32S3 Bk 35
Duke and Duchess of 40R3 Bk 39
Edinburgh
Argyll Strathspey 32S3 Bk 35
Ellie's Jig 32J3 Slip Knot
Reel of the 51st Division 32R3 Bk 13

For additional information call 703-461-7383 or 703-379-5779

Contributions to the refreshment table would be most appreciated!

Jay Andrews
Alexandria, VA, USA

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