strathspey Archive: Gates of Edinburgh Reels

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Gates of Edinburgh Reels

Message 17658 · The_Healys · 14 Jun 1999 02:22:25 · Top

Jim must stop going away. Every time I take a long weekend off,
Strathspey goes berserker.

One comment on this thread - there is an important difference
between the reels as danced in Gates of Edinburgh and what are
generally referred to as Gates of Edinburgh Reels by which is
usually meant Maxwell's Rant Reels - yes, Healy is an Irish name.

The difference was best expressed by Linda Gaul's father, Donald,
who was standing next to me in a set ready to dance GofE years ago
before we had recaps. I asked "how does this go, Donald?" meaning
the last 16 bars and he replied unforgettably, "Reels on the
opposite side, reels on your own side and a great loup!".. i.e. in
Maxwell's Rant, 1st couple finish back in place but in GofE they
finish 1st woman between the 2nd couple facing down and 1st man
between the 3rd couple facing up. I've never forgotten the
difference nor ever referred to 'ordinary' cross-over reels (a la
Maxwell) as Gates of Edinburgh Reels since then.

Jim Healy
Perth, Scotland

Gates of Edinburgh Reels

Message 17664 · Anselm Lingnau · 14 Jun 1999 10:30:57 · Top

Jim Healy <The_Healys@compuserve.com> writes:

> One comment on this thread - there is an important difference
> between the reels as danced in Gates of Edinburgh and what are
> generally referred to as Gates of Edinburgh Reels by which is
> usually meant Maxwell's Rant Reels [...]

True enough, come to think of it. At the risk of beating a dead horse,
this is what the Pilling book does to you -- the reels look perfectly
normal (as these things go) in the crib but then the first couple
suddenly teleports (or something) to the three-and-three-up-and-down-
the-dance formation. So the notion of those reels being the same in all
the dances that sport the little diagrams is (involuntarily) reinforced.

> I've never forgotten the
> difference nor ever referred to 'ordinary' cross-over reels (a la
> Maxwell) as Gates of Edinburgh Reels since then.

I don't know where the term `Gates of Edinburgh reels' came from in the
first place but to me this seems to be something worth being wary of. =

Good hint!

Anselm
-- =

Anselm Lingnau ......................... lingnau@tm.informatik.uni-frankf=
urt.de
The proper office of a friend is to side with you when you are in the wro=
ng.
Nearly anybody will side with you when you are in the right. -- Mark=
Twain

Gates of Edinburgh Reels

Message 17675 · ferguson · 15 Jun 1999 03:01:14 · Top

Now I have become confused.

According to this thread, Miss Milligan has both made statements against
touching hands in this specific dance, and in favour of touching hands in
suitable occasions (for dances in general).

Our beloved Blue Manual says: <quote> The derivation of the name has been
the subject of much discussion over the years. Although one school of
thought believes that the "gates" is used in the sense of the streets or
the thoroughfares, the generally accepted derivation is of the gates of the
walled city of Edinburgh being opened and closed at the beginning and end
of each day. AS A RESULT [my emphasis, ETF], it is accepted that in the
reels during bars 1-8 and 9-16, each couple should give nearer hands to
partners to signify such opening and closing of the gates. <unquote>

However, this thread now seems to tend towards accepting the etymology of
'gates' = swedish 'gata' = norwegian 'gate' = danish 'gade', all meaning
street. This in turn undermines the 'handing' conclusion of the Blue
Manual.

Now if I am dancing for enjoyment or in a demo, I will gladly follow
whatever the local group / teacher prefers, but if nothing is said, what
is one expected to do? My tendency is to follow the manual ("Right or
wrong, our Manual"), for lack of higher authority.

I hope that the Publications committee is listing in on this _Strathspey_
_List_. There have been many discussions like this on "what is the
correct way for .... ". I hope that these topics will find their way onto
the committee's agenda, and that we will shortly have their considered
opinion posted on this List.

Happy dancing,

Eric

|dr. E.T. Ferguson, Consultant for Energy and Development (MacFergus BV)|
|van Dormaalstraat 15, 5624 KH EINDHOVEN, Netherlands. |
|e-mail: e.ferguson@antenna.nl. phone:+31-40-2432878; fax:+31-40-2467036|

Gates of Edinburgh Reels

Message 17678 · cnordj · 15 Jun 1999 09:53:42 · Top

I share Eric's confusion, but for different reasons. I have at least one teacher that
indicates that taking hands in mirror reels is the sociable thing to do, and I have at
least one teacher who wrinkles her nose at the very idea. So I try to remember which
teacher wants what. But what each partner wants tends to override teacher, even.
That's in social dance, but not in demos. Complicated.

In the one dance GofE though, I think it is clear that hands should be taken a la the
Manual (amateur Scandiavian linguists' enjoyment of comparing languages
notwithstanding).
Happy Dancing,
Carol Johnson, LA

On Mon, 14 Jun 1999, "Eric T. Ferguson" <ferguson@antenna.nl> wrote:
>Now I have become confused.
>
>According to this thread, Miss Milligan has both made statements against
>touching hands in this specific dance, and in favour of touching hands in
>suitable occasions (for dances in general).
>
>Our beloved Blue Manual says: <quote> The derivation of the name has been
>the subject of much discussion over the years. Although one school of
>thought believes that the "gates" is used in the sense of the streets or
>the thoroughfares, the generally accepted derivation is of the gates of the
>walled city of Edinburgh being opened and closed at the beginning and end
>of each day. AS A RESULT [my emphasis, ETF], it is accepted that in the
>reels during bars 1-8 and 9-16, each couple should give nearer hands to
>partners to signify such opening and closing of the gates. <unquote>
>
>However, this thread now seems to tend towards accepting the etymology of
>'gates' = swedish 'gata' = norwegian 'gate' = danish 'gade', all meaning
>street. This in turn undermines the 'handing' conclusion of the Blue
>Manual.
>
>Now if I am dancing for enjoyment or in a demo, I will gladly follow
>whatever the local group / teacher prefers, but if nothing is said, what
>is one expected to do? My tendency is to follow the manual ("Right or
>wrong, our Manual"), for lack of higher authority.
>
>I hope that the Publications committee is listing in on this _Strathspey_
>_List_. There have been many discussions like this on "what is the
>correct way for .... ". I hope that these topics will find their way onto
>the committee's agenda, and that we will shortly have their considered
>opinion posted on this List.
>
>Happy dancing,
>
>Eric
>
>|dr. E.T. Ferguson, Consultant for Energy and Development (MacFergus BV)|
>|van Dormaalstraat 15, 5624 KH EINDHOVEN, Netherlands. |
>|e-mail: e.ferguson@antenna.nl. phone:+31-40-2432878; fax:+31-40-2467036|
>
>
>
>

Gates of Edinburgh Reels

Message 17679 · Pia · 15 Jun 1999 12:42:00 · Top

Can the other Scandinavian linguist also point out that she (in Denmark)
was told that the gates was in fact gates which opened and that you touched
hands. !!!!

The same scandinavian was also told many years ago (in Scotland) that even
in Scotland there was two approaches to holding hands whether in sets,
across sets or anywhere else - namely the Edinburgh way and the Glasgow
way - (the plot thickens). I will leave out the politics on who does what
:>)

I personally think that touching etc depends on the occasion - if it is
appropriate then by all means touch - if it is not - then don't. As a
teacher - if the class is stiff, unfriendly, shy and has no interaction,
perhaps you would want to encourage them to be a little more sociable by
asking them to take hands a certain times. On the other hands if you have
a class which cannot keep their hands, eyes etc. away from each other,
perhaps you would want to tone them down a bit in order to avoid accidents
because of exuberance. Perhaps this is why some are taught differently by
the same person.??

Who knows - as long as we have fun

Pia
(You can hold my hand anytime) :>)
----------
> From: cnordj@sprynet.com
> To: strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de
> Subject: Re: Gates of Edinburgh Reels
> Date: 15 June 1999 06:53
>
>
> In the one dance GofE though, I think it is clear that hands should be
taken a la the
> Manual (amateur Scandiavian linguists' enjoyment of comparing languages
> notwithstanding).
> Happy Dancing,
> Carol Johnson, LA
>
> On Mon, 14 Jun 1999, "Eric T. Ferguson" <ferguson@antenna.nl> wrote:
> >Now I have become confused.
> >
> >According to this thread, Miss Milligan has both made statements against

> >touching hands in this specific dance, and in favour of touching hands
in
> >suitable occasions (for dances in general).
> >

Gates of Edinburgh Reels

Message 17685 · Trans Vector Technologies, Inc · 16 Jun 1999 09:07:14 · Top

>[Carol:]
>I share Eric's confusion, but for different reasons. I have at least one
>teacher that indicates that taking hands in mirror reels is the sociable
>thing to do, and I have at least one teacher who wrinkles her nose at the
>very idea. So I try to remember which teacher wants what. But what each
>partner wants tends to override teacher, even. That's in social dance,
>but not in demos. Complicated.

I guess we each have our own crosses to bear. But when I am social dancing
(not demo), my first obligation is to my partner, and second to my set.
Nobody else figures in. Simple.

Cheers, Oberdan.

Trans Vector Technologies, Inc, 184 Estaban Drive, Camarillo, CA 93010-1611
Phone: (805)484-2775, FAX: (805)484-2718, EMail: ootto@tvt.com

Gates of Edinburgh Reels

Message 17666 · S.M.D.Phillips · 14 Jun 1999 13:56:32 · Top

-----Original Message-----
From: The_Healys <The_Healys@compuserve.com>
To: Strathspey <strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de>
Date: 13 June 1999 23:24
Subject: Gates of Edinburgh Reels

>>The difference was best expressed by Linda Gaul's father, Donald,
>who was standing next to me in a set ready to dance GofE years ago
>before we had recaps. I asked "how does this go, Donald?" meaning
>the last 16 bars and he replied unforgettably, "Reels on the
>opposite side, reels on your own side and a great loup>
>

A great loup describes it beautifully! Someone else said that dancers tend
to finish these reels early, but my only experience of trying to teach this
dance to a group of dancers, who while relatively experienced dancers, were
not very expert, was that they could not get anywhere near the right place
in time.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+ Stella Phillips
+ sphillips@sol.co.uk
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Gates of Edinburgh Reels

Message 17672 · Malcolm and Helen Brown · 14 Jun 1999 22:12:16 · Top

Greetings;

> >>The difference was best expressed by Linda Gaul's father, Donald,
> >who was standing next to me in a set ready to dance GofE years ago
> >before we had recaps. I asked "how does this go, Donald?" meaning
> >the last 16 bars and he replied unforgettably, "Reels on the
> >opposite side, reels on your own side and a great loup>
> >
>
> A great loup describes it beautifully! --

The "great loup" only applies to the dancing man! - One of the few
occasions when it is harder for the man than the woman?

Out of interest, how many people dance forwards out of the two-handed
turns, and how many retire backwards? (or do you dance differently
when you are the dancing couple cf supporting couple?)

Malcolm


_ _
|_|_ |_| Malcolm & Helen Brown - York (UK) - m.brown@netcomuk.co.uk (Tir-Nan-Og)
_ |_|_
|_| _|_| Connecting via NETCOM Internet Ltd
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Gates of Edinburgh Reels

Message 17673 · cnordj · 14 Jun 1999 23:08:01 · Top

Hello,
We dance forwards, whatever couple we are. For example, to turn 2 hands twice in 4
bars: Bars 1-2: full turn! Bar 3: half turn more and release hands. Bar 4: curve to
place (I visualize a quarter-circle arc). It looks very nice and it feels very nice.
Cheers, Carol J, Los Angeles Branch

[Malcolm Brown]
>Out of interest, how many people dance forwards out of the two-handed
>turns, and how many retire backwards? (or do you dance differently
>when you are the dancing couple cf supporting couple?)

Gates of Edinburgh Reels

Message 17674 · ron.mackey · 15 Jun 1999 02:17:14 · Top


> Out of interest, how many people dance forwards out of the two-handed
> turns, and how many retire backwards? (or do you dance differently
> when you are the dancing couple cf supporting couple?)
>
> Malcolm
>
Hi, Malcolm
This is one of the edicts of the early days which I have never found
difficult to follow. Never back out of a turn of any kind, unless
otherwise directed. e.g. poussette, allemande etc.
The only possible exception is when the hall is so elbow to
elbow crowded that you lose your partner if you take your eyes off
her.
Cheers, Ron :)

< 0 Ron Mackey,(Purveyor of Pat's Party Pieces)
'O> Mottingham,
/#\ London. UK.
l>
Ron.Mackey@btinternet.com

Backing out of turns (was Gates of Edinburgh Reels)

Message 17687 · Trans Vector Technologies, Inc · 16 Jun 1999 09:07:17 · Top

>[Malcolm:}
>Out of interest, how many people dance forwards out of the two-handed
>turns, and how many retire backwards? (or do you dance differently
>when you are the dancing couple cf supporting couple?)

I believe it is the practice in most of California to dance forward into
the sidelines from two-hand turns in Strathspey and in quick time for skip
change turns. That is what I teach. Also, I find it does need teaching,
along with the phrasing of the turn.

I don't recall a dance with 2H PdB turns other than at the end of
Poussette, for which we retire. In this case, however, I think of the
retiring as a movement distinct from the half turn. In the Allemande,
bringing the lady into the center is not a turn in the normal sense, and
the retiring to sidelines can also be thought of as distinct from any
turning action. Same for the end of the Strathspey Poussette.

So, after this bit of rambling, I don't think we have any exceptions--we
end all of our 2H turns by dancing forward into the sidelines. It seems to
me that doing a 2H turn and then retiring into the sidelines, is not a 2H
turn to sidelines at all, but a 2H turn followed by a retire--two distinct
movements.

I was wondering why Malcolm would ask this question. So I looked in The
Manual. Nothing. NOTHING? Astonishingly, yes. There are descriptions for
Casting and for Crossing but not for Turning of any kind, except as part of
other formation (e.g. Turn Corners and Partner). Am I missing some addenda?
My copy of the Manual is dated 1992 and has one undated addendum of three,
two-sided pages. Is this a major omission of a fundamental movement or
what? I guess this means that any ideas we have about "standards" for
turning are no more than folklore. I guess that in the face of such
standards, I may as well continue to teach turns as I have been.

Cheers, Oberdan.

P.S. Re 2H PdB turns. After writing the above, I recalled that The Argyll's
Farewell to Stirling as done in some parts of the world has a 2H PdB turn
(1/2 turn in 2 bars) to sidelines. Since we don't dance it that way around
here, I haven't actually tried it. It would seem to be a somewhat awkward
movement.

Trans Vector Technologies, Inc, 184 Estaban Drive, Camarillo, CA 93010-1611
Phone: (805)484-2775, FAX: (805)484-2718, EMail: ootto@tvt.com

Backing out of turns (was Gates of Edinburgh Reels)

Message 17692 · Smith, Kent · 16 Jun 1999 16:49:17 · Top

This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not understand
this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.

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Oberdan's analysis seems logical, but Malcolm's question is based on
experience. Even in my relatively few encounters with GoE (it's not done a
great deal in this part of the U.S.), I have certainly many times seen the
corners in GoE opening up to face the center with inside hands joined at the
end of bar three and then retiring diagonally to places leaving room for the
first couple to dance into place between them. (The movement is smoother
than that breakdown by bar suggests and can be quite elegant and sociable.)

And I've been in sets with RSCDS examiners who have made that movement, with
experienced tutors looking aghast. There's more flexibility out on the
social dance floor than the Manual and WYJD suggest.

Kent (Connecticut)

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<TITLE>RE: Backing out of turns (was Gates of Edinburgh Reels)</TITLE>
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<P><FONT SIZE=3D2>Oberdan's analysis seems logical, but Malcolm's =
question is based on experience.&nbsp; Even in my relatively few =
encounters with GoE (it's not done a great deal in this part of the =
U.S.), I have certainly many times seen the corners in GoE opening up =
to face the center with inside hands joined at the end of bar three and =
then retiring diagonally to places leaving room for the first couple to =
dance into place between them.&nbsp; (The movement is smoother than =
that breakdown by bar suggests and can be quite elegant and =
sociable.)</FONT></P>

<P><FONT SIZE=3D2>And I've been in sets with RSCDS examiners who have =
made that movement, with experienced tutors looking aghast.&nbsp; =
There's more flexibility out on the social dance floor than the Manual =
and WYJD suggest.</FONT></P>

<P>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; =
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <FONT SIZE=3D2>Kent (Connecticut)</FONT>
</P>

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Backing out of turns (was Gates of Edinburgh Reels)

Message 17698 · Malcolm and Helen Brown · 16 Jun 1999 23:49:34 · Top

Greetings;

> [Oberdan:}
>
> I don't recall a dance with 2H PdB turns other than at the end of
> Poussette, for which we retire.

Speed the Plough
Perth Medley
Culloden's Fancy
Rothesay Country Dance
Hamilton House
Miss Bennett's Jig

? Fight about the Fireside?

? Cadgers? (Not according to the Manual, but the way it was danced
by some people pre-manual)

The reason I asked is that when we were taught 2 handed (and therefore
pas de basque) turns - (exceptions Knit the Pocky and D & D of Edinburgh)
we always used one step to dance backwards into the sidelines.
So Muirland Willie had a 4 bar sequence, all pas de basque, of
1 Set
2 Advance
3 1/2 Turn partner
4 Retire

And therefore in Gates of Edinburgh dancing couple set twice, then advance,
turn, turn, retire and at the same time the supporting couples set twice,
advance, turn, turn, and retire - this produces a magical "explosion",
to use a phrase employed by one of our teachers. (It was a full
certificate dance all those years ago, so I think there must have been
a lot of us dancing it the same way then. I know it is still a full
certificate dance, but no-one seems to bother about such details now!)

Malcolm

--
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Backing out of turns (was Gates of Edinburgh Reels)

Message 17707 · Martin Mulligan · 17 Jun 1999 17:00:20 · Top

>> [Oberdan:}
>>
>> I don't recall a dance with 2H PdB turns other than at the end of
>> Poussette, for which we retire.

I remember dancing with a visiting teacher a number of years ago.
I think it was with Claire Goodman at Pinewoods but it might have
been with Lesley Martin at TAC. We were dancing one of the dances
from the early book - might have been "Fight About the Fireside"

To my consternation, my partner suggested that we turn with both
hands and pas-de-basque rather than with right hands and skip
change. As she said at that time - one has a choice in such a
situation. And, I recall noticing recently that such a choice is
explicitly mentioned for at least one dance in my copy of one of
the early pocket books.

[Apologies for being vague about the particular dance, I had
intended to look this up at home last night but forgot]

At any rate, I don't think that it was possible then to avoid
backing out to place when using the two-handed pas-de-basque
option. There were/are 4 bars to turn halfway.

Martin

=========================================================================
Martin E. Mulligan
St. John's (Newfoundland)
mulligan@morgan.ucs.mun.ca
=========================================================================

Backing out of turns (was Gates of Edinburgh Reels)

Message 17708 · Norah Link · 17 Jun 1999 17:27:25 · Top

>>> Martin E. Mulligan <mulligan@morgan.ucs.mun.ca> 17/06/99 10:03 am >>>
I recall noticing recently that such a choice is
explicitly mentioned for at least one dance in my copy of one of
the early pocket books.
<<<

As I recall, The Fairy Dance (book 3) has a 4-bar turn back to own sides for 1st
couple. This is specified as either a turn one-and-a-half with right hands or a
half turn with 2 hands using pdb. (Mind you, I haven't looked at it recently, so
I can't recall if it's specified as a choice in the dance instructions, or if the
instructions don't say anything more than "turn to own sides" and the Manual
provides the choice under notes for dances.)

This raises another question for the history buffs: were such "choices" common in
the early dances? Anyone know how this choice came to be (was it a case of people
weren't sure, so they made it a choice, or was it a common individual variation?),
and why we no longer seem to follow this practice?

Norah Link (Montreal)

Backing out of turns (was Gates of Edinburgh Reels)

Message 17709 · Nicola Howarth · 17 Jun 1999 17:40:53 · Top

I've only just come into this stream, so apologies if this has already
been said.

Martin, lots of people have this problem. I was taught as follows:
Ignoring the hands for the moment, dance from your own place in a circle
almost through your partners place. There is obviously no need to back
into your own place when you are dancing in a circle.

Then following the same route, start the circle on bar 1, join hands
with partner and turn, still following your own circle on bars 2-3, let
go and continue the circle back home on bar 4.

Some flexibility is required, but this does work, and it can look most
elegant, especially with two or three couples covering each other. But
you have to remember to let go hands in plenty of time, otherwise you
will be forced to dance backwards.

Nicola Howarth
Cambridge, UK

Martin E. Mulligan wrote:
>
>
> At any rate, I don't think that it was possible then to avoid
> backing out to place when using the two-handed pas-de-basque
> option. There were/are 4 bars to turn halfway.
>

Backing out of turns (was Gates of Edinburgh Reels)

Message 17713 · ron.mackey · 18 Jun 1999 01:38:19 · Top

> I remember dancing with a visiting teacher a number of years ago.
> I think it was with Claire Goodman at Pinewoods but it might have
> been with Lesley Martin at TAC. We were dancing one of the dances
> from the early book - might have been "Fight About the Fireside"
>
> To my consternation, my partner suggested that we turn with both
> hands and pas-de-basque rather than with right hands and skip
> change. As she said at that time - one has a choice in such a
> situation.
> Martin

Hi,
Has anyone got a pre 1945 copy of book 9, please. I have one
somewhere but it was put away as a memento when I got the new
version.
The reason is that I am interested in bars 37-40 of Cadgers.
Is the instruction for the turn to be left-handed been inserted ?
Or did it just say ' turn 1 1/2 times to own side'?
I am curious because I can remember attending The Chatham (Kent) day
school 40 or so years ago where an instructor called Tiki West had us
dancing a two handed one and a half PdeB turn in four bars to get
back to our own side. As we worked on it for 20/30 mins. you will
understand why I remember her and the incident after all this time !!
It is just possible and if you wish to try remember to keep the set
2 1/2 paces across ! ( As though you would cheat on a thing
like that !) :)
Of course it may not have been Cadgers. But it was a pleasant
spring morning, she wore a red dress, she had dark hair, was 5'10"ish
weighed about 8 1/2 stone, and was a P.T. Instructor. Other than
that I've just about forgotten all about it ! :)

Cheers, Ron :)

< 0 Ron Mackey,(Purveyor of Pat's Party Pieces)
'O> Mottingham,
/#\ London. UK.
l>
Ron.Mackey@btinternet.com

Backing out of turns (was Gates of Edinburgh Reels)

Message 17714 · Malcolm and Helen Brown · 18 Jun 1999 03:16:14 · Top

[Ron]
> Hi,
> Has anyone got a pre 1945 copy of book 9, please. I have one
> somewhere but it was put away as a memento when I got the new
> version.
> The reason is that I am interested in bars 37-40 of Cadgers.
> Is the instruction for the turn to be left-handed been inserted ?
> Or did it just say ' turn 1 1/2 times to own side'?

I don't know about pre-1945, but my 1951 edition just says "turn
one-and-a-half times"

This of course gave one the choice of turning RH, giving an easy
entry into the R&L.

The 2 handed pas-de-basque version has also been mentioned to me
by Duncan Macleod and more recently Bill Ireland - I certainly
find it more of a challenge than the one handed turns

Malcolm
--
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Backing out of turns (was Gates of Edinburgh Reels)

Message 17715 · Martin.Sheffield · 18 Jun 1999 19:35:42 · Top

someone wrote:
> I think it was with Claire Goodman at Pinewoods but it might have
> been with Lesley Martin

YHow could you possibly confuse two people so very different?

Martin,
in Grenoble, France.
---
http://perso.wanadoo.fr/scots.in.france/
(dancing, dances, cycling ...)

Backing out of turns (was Gates of Edinburgh Reels)

Message 17717 · Martin Mulligan · 18 Jun 1999 21:32:26 · Top

Martin, in Grenoble, France, wrote:

>someone wrote:
>> I think it was with Claire Goodman at Pinewoods but it might have
>> been with Lesley Martin
>
>How could you possibly confuse two people so very different?

Oh, I would not confuse them for a minute, Martin. The incident
in question, however, was nowhere near as traumatic as that
decribed so memorably by Ron Mackey so that even though it is not
even 20 years since it took place, I do not have a clear visual
impression of who my partner was, I could not tell you what she
was wearing, nor can I tell you where it took place.

Martin in St. John's (Newfoundland)

=========================================================================
Martin E. Mulligan
St. John's (Newfoundland)
mulligan@morgan.ucs.mun.ca
=========================================================================

Gates of Edinburgh Reels

Message 17686 · Trans Vector Technologies, Inc · 16 Jun 1999 09:07:15 · Top

>[Stella:]
>A great loup describes it beautifully! Someone else said that dancers tend
>to finish these reels early, but my only experience of trying to teach this
>dance to a group of dancers, who while relatively experienced dancers, were
>not very expert, was that they could not get anywhere near the right place
>in time.

Interesting...My experience is that finishing these reels is no problem for
anyone but first man, and only then if he fails to plan ahead. The main
difference between doing these reels and the ones in The Express is extra
acceleration on the last 2 bars for 1st and 2nd couples.

Cheers, Oberdan.

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Gates of Edinburgh Reels

Message 17677 · Angus Henry · 15 Jun 1999 07:22:00 · Top

>The difference was best expressed by Linda Gaul's father, Donald,
>who was standing next to me in a set ready to dance GofE years ago
>before we had recaps. I asked "how does this go, Donald?" meaning
>the last 16 bars and he replied unforgettably, "Reels on the
>opposite side, reels on your own side and a great loup!".. i.e. in
>Maxwell's Rant, 1st couple finish back in place but in GofE they
>finish 1st woman between the 2nd couple facing down and 1st man
>between the 3rd couple facing up. I've never forgotten the
>difference nor ever referred to 'ordinary' cross-over reels (a la
>Maxwell) as Gates of Edinburgh Reels since then.
>
>Jim Healy

Interesting. A couple of years ago at St Andrews, Linda, when teaching a
dance to the teachers class, asked them to begin by walking through "Gates
of Edinburgh Reels" for the 1st 16 bars. She then looked at me and asked
why I was standing in the middle of the set between 3rd couple, and I
explained that I had just walked through "Gates of Edinburgh Reels" as
instructed (without any great loup at all!). Linda used the occasion to
open to debate the question of using such a description, and the great
majority of the class agreed that it was better to avoid describing
processes in one dance by reference to another; in this case descriptions
such as "cross over reels" with whatever qualifying details as needed being
the preferred option.

Angus

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Gates of Edinburgh Reels

Message 17680 · Ian Brown · 15 Jun 1999 14:11:59 · Top

"The only possible exception is when the hall is so elbow to elbow
crowded that you lose your partner if you take your eyes off her."
Another good reason for holding her hand whenever the opportunity
presents!
Regards
Ian Brown
Harrogate

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