strathspey Archive: The Wood Duck

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The Wood Duck

Message 17569 · Dianna Shipman · 8 Jun 1999 06:21:32 · Top

Is anyone familiar with a dance called "The Wood Duck" and if so would you
privately email me a description?
Thank you,
Dianna
Dianna L. Shipman
diannashipman@worldnet.att.net
Dianna L. Shipman, P.C., Attorney at Law
1436 W.Gray, #134
Houston, TX 77019-4946
web page: http://home.att.net/~diannashipman
phone: 713-522-1212

The Wood Duck

Message 17570 · Richard L. Walker · 8 Jun 1999 06:28:06 · Top

I found "The Leg of a Duck" and "The Rubber Duck's Jig." Both are jigs.

Richard L Walker
Pensacola, FL 32504-7726 USA
rlwalker@granis.net

-----Original Message-----
From: Dianna Shipman [mailto:diannashipman@worldnet.att.net]
Is anyone familiar with a dance called "The Wood Duck" and if so would you
privately email me a description?

The Wood Duck

Message 17572 · Mike Mudrey · 8 Jun 1999 08:16:44 · Top

It is by Fried deMetz Herman

waltz time, 32 bars

Circle, men on inside, women on outside

1- 4 Right shoulder gypsy partner
5-8 Turn left hand neighbor by left
9-12 Left shoulder gypsy partner
13-16 turn right hand neighbor by right
17-20 Take two hand with partner, shashay two steps counter clockwise,
turn, retain woman's right hand in man's left hand, burn woman under to
man's left side forming aback ring all facing out
21-24 All balance out, all balance in, men turn woman on right hand forward
adn around into ballroom hold
25-32 Waltz around the circle counter clockwise with new partner.

Choice of music:

Bare Necessities, Take a Dance Flying Fish Nunmber 70564, Track 5,
available from CDSS

At 09:20 PM 6/7/1999 -0500, you wrote:
>Is anyone familiar with a dance called "The Wood Duck" and if so would you
>privately email me a description?
>Thank you,
>Dianna
>Dianna L. Shipman
>diannashipman@worldnet.att.net
>Dianna L. Shipman, P.C., Attorney at Law
>1436 W.Gray, #134
>Houston, TX 77019-4946
>web page: http://home.att.net/~diannashipman
>phone: 713-522-1212
>
Mike Mudrey
P.O. Box 22
New Glarus, Wisconsin 53574-0022

mgmudrey@madison.tds.net

The Wood Duck

Message 17573 · Norman Dahl · 8 Jun 1999 13:02:15 · Top

Someone's trying to decoy you, Diana

-norman-

---
Norman Dahl
PO Box 578 Lutwyche Qld 4030

----- Original Message -----
From: Dianna Shipman <diannashipman@worldnet.att.net>
To: Strathspey Articles <strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de>
Sent: Tuesday, 8 June 1999 12:20
Subject: The Wood Duck

> Is anyone familiar with a dance called "The Wood Duck" and if so would you
> privately email me a description?
> Thank you,
> Dianna
> Dianna L. Shipman
> diannashipman@worldnet.att.net
> Dianna L. Shipman, P.C., Attorney at Law
> 1436 W.Gray, #134
> Houston, TX 77019-4946
> web page: http://home.att.net/~diannashipman
> phone: 713-522-1212
>
>
>

The Wood Duck

Message 17574 · SMiskoe · 8 Jun 1999 15:20:29 · Top

The Wood Duck tune is also found in Peter Barnes' English Country Dance book.
It is in 3/4 meter but is not played as a waltz. If it were, the dance
would not work.
Cheers,
Sylvia Miskoe, Concord, NH USA

The Wood Duck

Message 17579 · SallenNic · 9 Jun 1999 02:36:14 · Top

In a message dated 8/6/1999 12:21:28 pm, you wrote:

<<The Wood Duck tune is also found in Peter Barnes' English Country Dance
book.
It is in 3/4 meter but is not played as a waltz. If it were, the dance
would not work.
Cheers,
Sylvia Miskoe, Concord, NH USA>>

I am a loss to understand why Sylvia says the dance would not work if the
tune were played as a waltz, particularly as Fried's instructions are to
"waltz on" at the end of the B music. The dance is very definitely a waltz,
and is played as such.
Mike Mudrey suggested the Bare Necessities recording of the tune. It
is a lovely recording and beautiful for listening, but, like so many of Bare
Necessities' tracks, the tune gets lost several times among the other
invention, and is at one point played in canon with itself, which makes it
very difficult to dance to for all but really experienced dancers.
There is another recording by 'Hold the Mustard', called "It's easy
... when you know where you are going", and this is a much easier recording
to dance to. I cannot put my hand on my copy of the recording to quote its
catalogue number, but Fried de Metz Herman in Larchmont or the CDSS in
Northampton, Mass. would be able to supply, I am sure.

Nicolas B., Lanark, Scotland.

The Wood Duck

Message 17580 · Mike Mudrey · 9 Jun 1999 05:50:33 · Top

Concur with Nicolas. Bare Necessities can get lost...but that is one of
the things that I like. And yes, the Hold the Mustard version can be a
little clearer.

Putting in another plug. Any of Nicolas B and the Assembly Player's CD are
wonderful! My current favorite is Playford from the New World .

First time we blindly played "Early One Morning" to dance Winter Solstice,
I forgot to notice the ABB and not AABB! Made for a very interesting
dance! Especially when many of us were dancing to the phrases and not
counting!

> There is another recording by 'Hold the Mustard', called "It's easy
>... when you know where you are going", and this is a much easier recording
>to dance to. I cannot put my hand on my copy of the recording to quote its
>catalogue number, but Fried de Metz Herman in Larchmont or the CDSS in
>Northampton, Mass. would be able to supply, I am sure.
>
> Nicolas B., Lanark, Scotland.

Mike Mudrey
P.O. Box 22
New Glarus, Wisconsin 53574-0022

mgmudrey@madison.tds.net

The Wood Duck

Message 17581 · SMiskoe · 9 Jun 1999 06:43:04 · Top

I guess I am so accustomed to the Bare Necessities version of Wood Duck that
I don't consider it a oom-pah-pah waltz. That is what I meant about not
playing it as a waltz.
Since Bare Necessities members are all from New England, they dominate the
English Dance scene in this area.
Cheers,
Sylvia Miskoe, Concord, NH USA

The Wood Duck

Message 17582 · Dianna Shipman · 9 Jun 1999 07:14:49 · Top

In searching for this dance, instead I got an internet page for duck hunters
informing me that the Wood Duck is hard to decoy!
Dianna
Dianna L. Shipman
diannashipman@worldnet.att.net
Dianna L. Shipman, P.C., Attorney at Law
1436 W.Gray, #134
Houston, TX 77019-4946
web page: http://home.att.net/~diannashipman
phone: 713-522-1212
----- Original Message -----
From: Norman Dahl <norman@dahlfamily.org>
To: <strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de>
Sent: Tuesday, June 08, 1999 3:44 AM
Subject: Re: The Wood Duck

> Someone's trying to decoy you, Diana
>
> -norman-
>
> ---
> Norman Dahl
> PO Box 578 Lutwyche Qld 4030
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: Dianna Shipman <diannashipman@worldnet.att.net>
> To: Strathspey Articles <strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de>
> Sent: Tuesday, 8 June 1999 12:20
> Subject: The Wood Duck
>
>
> > Is anyone familiar with a dance called "The Wood Duck" and if so would
you
> > privately email me a description?
> > Thank you,
> > Dianna
> > Dianna L. Shipman
> > diannashipman@worldnet.att.net
> > Dianna L. Shipman, P.C., Attorney at Law
> > 1436 W.Gray, #134
> > Houston, TX 77019-4946
> > web page: http://home.att.net/~diannashipman
> > phone: 713-522-1212
> >
> >
> >
>
>
> --
> "Norman Dahl" <norman@dahlfamily.org>
>
>

The Wood Duck

Message 17592 · Mike Mudrey · 10 Jun 1999 02:53:37 · Top

For those of us who waltz Scandinavian and Austrian style, a waltz is not
oom-pah-pah.
We waltz, long, long, short (step-step-close)
I find oom-pah-pah waltzes very hard to follow, and usually end up doing a
flat footed waltz or a landeler.

mm

At 10:38 PM 6/8/1999 -0400, you wrote:
>I guess I am so accustomed to the Bare Necessities version of Wood Duck that
>I don't consider it a oom-pah-pah waltz. That is what I meant about not
>playing it as a waltz.
>Since Bare Necessities members are all from New England, they dominate the
>English Dance scene in this area.
>Cheers,
>Sylvia Miskoe, Concord, NH USA
>
>--
>SMiskoe@aol.com
>
Mike Mudrey
P.O. Box 22
New Glarus, Wisconsin 53574-0022

mgmudrey@madison.tds.net

The Wood Duck

Message 17583 · Bryan McAlister · 9 Jun 1999 12:45:55 · Top

In article <199906080416.XAA17501@mail.tds.net>, Mike Mudrey
<mgmudrey@madison.tds.net> writes
>It is by Fried deMetz Herman
>
>waltz time, 32 bars
>
>Circle, men on inside, women on outside
>
>1- 4 Right shoulder gypsy partner
>5-8 Turn left hand neighbor by left
>9-12 Left shoulder gypsy partner
Gypsy? Is this an advance to meet side by side?
Grateful if you would advise me.
Bryan McAlister B Arch RIBA ARIAS
Web page www.bryanmac.demon.co.uk
Mobile phone 07801 793849

The Wood Duck

Message 17584 · Anselm Lingnau · 9 Jun 1999 13:17:44 · Top

Bryan McAlister <Bryan@bryanmac.demon.co.uk> writes:

> Gypsy? Is this an advance to meet side by side?

There are a few modern Scottish country dances which feature `gypsy
turns', which are turns without giving hands. I don't know enough about
English country dancing to be able to tell whether this is meant here.

If I remember correctly, there should be some earlier discussion of this
in the archive -- try entering `gypsy' (or `gipsy'?) in the search form.

Anselm
--
Anselm Lingnau ......................... lingnau@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de
What the world really needs is more love and less paperwork. -- Pearl Bailey

The Wood Duck

Message 17588 · Priscilla M. Burrage · 9 Jun 1999 17:07:13 · Top

On Wed, 9 Jun 1999, Anselm Lingnau wrote:

> Bryan McAlister <Bryan@bryanmac.demon.co.uk> writes:
>
> > Gypsy? Is this an advance to meet side by side?
>
> There are a few modern Scottish country dances which feature `gypsy
> turns', which are turns without giving hands. I don't know enough about
> English country dancing to be able to tell whether this is meant here.

To gypsy or 'gyp' is to face your partner more or less nose to nose,
shoulders parallel (not easy) and then bothof you dance clockwise around
each other for a complete circular movement. The beginning and the
finishing are, as are all ECD figures, modified heavily by the figure
preceding and following.

A gypsy is similar to turning with both hands in that the pivot point is
between the dancers, the body angles relative to each other are the same,
and the turning is most ocmmonly clockwise; however, in many 20th century
dances, the turn goes counterclockwise, just as the reel of four (hey for
four) in some modern dances is done with left shoulders on the outside and
right shoulders to pass.

It is important to gaze into each other's eyes while executing a gypsy,
but the lustful looks are optional. By the way, as with all toher
figures in Scottish and English dancing, it is also very important to
be aware of all the other dancers in the set (and on the floor) while
executing the gypsy.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Priscilla Burrage Vermont US
(pburrage@zoo.uvm.edu)

The Wood Duck

Message 17590 · SallenNic · 9 Jun 1999 17:17:54 · Top

In a message dated 9/6/1999 2:08:18 pm, you wrote:

<<To gypsy or 'gyp' is to face your partner more or less nose to nose,
shoulders parallel (not easy) and then bothof you dance clockwise around
each other for a complete circular movement. The beginning and the
finishing are, as are all ECD figures, modified heavily by the figure
preceding and following. >>

The "more or less nose to nose" Gypsy is an almost entirely American creation
- British country dancers are not keen on getting too close to their
partners, and many of them find intense eye-to-eye contact difficult to cope
with!

Nicolas B.

The Wood Duck

Message 17607 · Bryan McAlister · 10 Jun 1999 23:26:59 · Top

In article <Pine.A41.3.96.990609085735.86574D-100000@elk.uvm.edu>,
Priscilla M. Burrage <pburrage@zoo.uvm.edu> writes
>On Wed, 9 Jun 1999, Anselm Lingnau wrote:
>
>> Bryan McAlister <Bryan@bryanmac.demon.co.uk> writes:
>>
>
>It is important to gaze into each other's eyes while executing a gypsy,
>but the lustful looks are optional. By the way, as with all toher
>figures in Scottish and English dancing, it is also very important to
>be aware of all the other dancers in the set (and on the floor) while
>executing the gypsy.
>
>~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>Priscilla Burrage Vermont US
>(pburrage@zoo.uvm.edu)

Great I can do lustful looks. I think...
Bryan McAlister B Arch RIBA ARIAS
Web page www.bryanmac.demon.co.uk
Mobile phone 07801 793849

The Wood Duck

Message 17608 · Keith Grant · 10 Jun 1999 23:57:37 · Top

Bryan McAlister wrote:
>
> Great I can do lustful looks. I think...

However, to avoid injury, you should always warmup first with merely
flirtatious looks. It may also be a good idea to condition yourself,
increasing the lustfulness of your looks by no more than 10% per week.

...Keith

--

+-----------------------------+-------------------------------------------+
I Keith Eric Grant I Common sense and a sense of humor are the I
I I same thing, moving at different speeds. I
I Atmospheric Science Div I A sense of humor is just common sense, I
I P.O. Box 808, L-103 I dancing. ... Clive James I
I Lawrence Livrmr Natn'l Lab I I
I EMail: keg@llnl.gov I (or perhaps dancing is just common sense) I
I FAX: (925) 422-5844 I I
+-----------------------------+-------------------------------------------+

The Wood Duck

Message 17609 · Melanie Pratt · 10 Jun 1999 23:57:43 · Top

Lustful looks are wonderful when executing the Gypsy, especially
in Strathcare. However, make sure that the wife of the man you
are currently 'gypsying with' isn't in the same set!
Slainte,
Melanie the Seanachie

> -----Original Message-----
> From: Bryan McAlister [SMTP:Bryan@bryanmac.demon.co.uk]
> Sent: Thursday, June 10, 1999 3:27 PM
> To: strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de
> Subject: Re: The Wood Duck
<snip> >
> >It is important to gaze into each other's eyes while executing a
> gypsy,
> >but the lustful looks are optional. By the way, as with all toher
> >figures in Scottish and English dancing, it is also very important to
> >be aware of all the other dancers in the set (and on the floor) while
> >executing the gypsy.
> >
> >~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> >Priscilla Burrage Vermont US
> >(pburrage@zoo.uvm.edu)
>
> Great I can do lustful looks. I think...
> Bryan McAlister B Arch RIBA ARIAS
> Web page www.bryanmac.demon.co.uk
> Mobile phone 07801 793849

The Wood Duck

Message 17612 · Norah Link · 11 Jun 1999 01:35:36 · Top

Oh, I thought you meant injury from a 3rd party (the lustee or a jealous spouse).

Norah

>>> <strathspey-request@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de> 10/06/99 03:56 pm >>>
Bryan McAlister wrote:
>
> Great I can do lustful looks. I think...

However, to avoid injury, you should always warmup first with merely
flirtatious looks. It may also be a good idea to condition yourself,
increasing the lustfulness of your looks by no more than 10% per week.

...Keith

--

+-----------------------------+-------------------------------------------+
I Keith Eric Grant I Common sense and a sense of humor are the I
I I same thing, moving at different speeds. I
I Atmospheric Science Div I A sense of humor is just common sense, I
I P.O. Box 808, L-103 I dancing. ... Clive James I
I Lawrence Livrmr Natn'l Lab I I
I EMail: keg@llnl.gov I (or perhaps dancing is just common sense) I
I FAX: (925) 422-5844 I I
+-----------------------------+-------------------------------------------+

The Wood Duck

Message 17613 · Keith Grant · 11 Jun 1999 02:48:30 · Top

Norah Link wrote:
>
> Oh, I thought you meant injury from a 3rd party (the lustee or a jealous spouse).
>
> Norah
>

I was thinking more, borrowing a metaphor from Tai Chi, of the hazards of
overextending one's Chi without adequate practice and preparation. The
result of such recklessness can leave one depleted of energy and in a
malaise.

Fully realizing how deep a hole one can dig themselves into by generalizing
in these areas, I'll generalize anyway in responding to Norah's thoughts.
Since I'm off to Mendocino for Scandinavian dance camp tomorrow, any overly
hot mail will be cold ashes by my return.

Injury from the lustee would seem to imply that the lustful looks were being
done as a recitation (a preen so to speak) rather than a dance -- a dance
almost by definition having a contribution of energy from both parties.
There needs to be some early nonverbal negotiation as to mood, tempo, and
interest.

Danger from a jealous arousal might also be considered to stem from another
violation of dance protocol -- not maintaining awareness and connection with
your entire set. The lack of such awareness might tempt one to carry a
lustful look on past its eternal moment but, as Norah implies, such
impudence is not without its risks.

To carry off a passable lustful look is not unduly difficult, but to carry
one off with true finesse, as with other SCD techniques, requires a
commitment to practice regularly and with feeling. Not for the faint of
heart.

...Keith

--

+-----------------------------+-------------------------------------------+
I Keith Eric Grant I Common sense and a sense of humor are the I
I I same thing, moving at different speeds. I
I Atmospheric Science Div I A sense of humor is just common sense, I
I P.O. Box 808, L-103 I dancing. ... Clive James I
I Lawrence Livrmr Natn'l Lab I I
I EMail: keg@llnl.gov I (or perhaps dancing is just common sense) I
I FAX: (925) 422-5844 I I
+-----------------------------+-------------------------------------------+

The Wood Duck

Message 17627 · Bryan McAlister · 11 Jun 1999 22:00:09 · Top

In article <2BD14575E16CD111BFCA00600896EA4B704DB1@ohiohistory.org>,
Melanie Pratt <mpratt@ohiohistory.org> writes
>Lustful looks are wonderful when executing the Gypsy, especially
>in Strathcare. However, make sure that the wife of the man you
>are currently 'gypsying with' isn't in the same set!
I knew there would be problem. I thought I would get to do it with
girls.
Bryan McAlister B Arch RIBA ARIAS
Web page www.bryanmac.demon.co.uk
Mobile phone 07801 793849

Scottish Dance with Gypsey (re Wood Duck)

Message 17593 · Mike Mudrey · 10 Jun 1999 02:54:18 · Top

Modern Scottish Dance using gypsy by Charles Snowdon
Other dances found at the Madison Wisconsin February 1999 Party
http://sprott.physics.wisc.edu/mscd/feb99prog.html

Ann Lindsey's Strathspey 32S-3C
C. T. Snowdon
1-8 1C & 2C The Lindsey Progression
1-2 1C & 2C SET advancing
3-6 1C & 2C DANCE IN CIRCLE round partner 1.5 times spiralling out
to partner's place.
7-8 1C & 2C FOUR HANDS ROUND halfway (couples have changed
places)
9-16 1C & 3C REPEAT The Lindsey
17-20 1C LEAD UP between 3C and CAST behind 2C to top, 2C & 3C
STEP DOWN on bars 19-20.
21-24 1C TURN partner with BH
25-32 1C & 2C THE KNOT.

At 11:17 AM 6/9/1999 +0200, you wrote:

>There are a few modern Scottish country dances which feature `gypsy
>turns', which are turns without giving hands.
>Anselm
>--
>Anselm Lingnau .........................
lingnau@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de
>What the world really needs is more love and less paperwork. -- Pearl
Bailey
>
Mike Mudrey
P.O. Box 22
New Glarus, Wisconsin 53574-0022

mgmudrey@madison.tds.net

The Wood Duck

Message 17585 · SallenNic · 9 Jun 1999 13:21:41 · Top

WONDERFUL!!!!
Nicolas B.

The Wood Duck

Message 17587 · SMiskoe · 9 Jun 1999 15:25:41 · Top

A gypsy, as I was taught it, is a turn around your partner without giving
hands, which is why you can do either right or left shoulder. It is a
flirtation figure with lots of eye contact and a certain amount of
calculation in how much space one makes between one and one's partner. Also,
do you decide to act as the pivot point and make your partner walk around you
or do you trace equal paths. A lot of variation for 4 bars.
Cheers,
sylvia Miskoe, concord, NH USA

The Wood Duck

Message 17589 · SallenNic · 9 Jun 1999 17:07:37 · Top

Sylvia's description of a Gypsy is substantially correct. The movement
involves two dancers circling all the way round each other, remaining facing
each other the while. It is, however, much less ambiguous to refer to it as a
"clockwise Gypsy" or "anticlockwise (counterclockwise) Gypsy", rather than
using the terms "left shoulder Gypsy" and "right shoulder Gypsy".
The movement involving moving forward to stand side by side with
partner is known, quite simply, as "siding"! Playford uses the instruction
"Sides all".
Oh, and yes, the movement required in the Wood Duck is the Gypsy
described above and by Sylvia.

Nicolas B., LANARK, Scotland.

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