strathspey Archive: Vicky Bestock: Dancing to the beat (long but worth it)

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Vicky Bestock: Dancing to the beat (long but worth it)

Message 17508 · Smith, Kent · 4 Jun 1999 19:27:17 · Top

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There has been a recent thread on the English Country Dance list about
stepping up and down more precisely, moving with the music, phrasing, etc.
that is reminiscent of many such discussions among SCDers. Indeed, the
thread was begun with an observation that SCD teachers are much more "fussy"
about stepping up and down than are ECD callers.

That thread led to the following submission by Vicky Bestock, whom I believe
lives in the Seattle, Washington, USA, area. IMHO, it has a great deal of
value and insight for SCD teachers, and I'm passing it along with Vicky's
permission. (For those unfamiliar with ECD, forward a double and back a
double is 4 steps forward, usually done step-step-step-close, and 4 steps
back.)

Kent (Connecticut, USA)

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

From: paul/victoria bestock [bestockp@oz.net]
Sent: Thursday, June 03, 1999 2:46 PM
To: ECD@SSRL04.SLAC.STANFORD.EDU
Subject: dancing to the beat

There has been some discussion on dancing to the beat, with several people
suggesting that some people don't "feel" the beat, and some hear it
"differently."

When I started teaching folk dance full time, I did believe that some
people just didn't have a sense of rhythm. I thought that those who didn't
hear the beat couldn't learn, and those who heard it, but didn't move to
it, could improve, so I started testing students to see which problem they
had. In order to eliminate coordination, momentum and balance problems from
the mix, I had students clap to the beat and if they couldn't do that,
speak or make a vocal noise on the beat. Every single person, including
one kid with cerebral palsy, passed. They all heard the beat.

So experience taught me that there are several problems getting in their
way, but HEARING the beat is not one of them. Everyone hears the beat if
they listen for it (some dancers think of music as glorified background
noise-- they could hear the beat if they tried but they don't-- this is a
different issue).

1) Dancers need to understand that what we mean by dancing on the beat is
FINISHING a movement on the beat. Some dancers hear the beat, then move in
response. They think they are dancing on the beat because they are
listening for it and responding to it, but their footfalls are inevitably
after the beat.
They need to change their thinking about what we mean by dancing on the
beat, planning ahead to have the foot touch on the beat, instead of
starting the movement then. This is more common than you think. Knowing
what is expected (ending the movement on the beat) plus practice can fix
this.

2) Walking requires leaning forward so you are slightly off balance, moving
one leg forward, and catching yourself from falling just on the beat. This
takes timing and coordination, and is a learned skill. Most of us have a
lot of experience getting the feel of how much lean to do so that we don't
step too soon or too late, and those of us who started being exposed to
music and dance very young don't realize that it isn't innate because we
learned it so young. But some adult beginners are trying this for the
first time. They aren't successful initially, but will learn to do it with
practice.

3) Some dancers have poor posture and poor body mechanics. They don't have
their weight centered, so they can't change direction easily. They are
often falling in the wrong direction, having to take extra steps to keep
from falling forward, or they are starting backwards too late because they
haven't adjusted their posture to account for momentum. To change
direction, one actually leans (from the ankles, not bending the body)
slightly in the opposite direction from the way one is moving, reducing the
momentum in the old direction, timing this so that the body comes to a
point of balance exactly at the phrase end, and starts falling in the new
direction at the beginning of the next phrase. Beginners don't do this.
They lean into the direction they are going, and it takes some extra time
to change direction-- they are late because they are shifting their body
weight and overcoming momentum. They go forward a double and it takes 5
1/2 steps before they can start moving backwards. As they gain better
posture and more experience, they can work all this out, and they dance in
time. For direction changes (e.g. up a double and back) I used to help
students speed up the process by telling them to "hang themselves up by
the hair" leaving their body more or less where it was, and moving their
feet underneath. This image reduced the upper body lurching in each
direction and enabled them to change direction more efficiently.

4) Some dancers have sluggish coordination. IT takes a LONG time for the
signal from the brain to move the feet, so they think about doing the
motion and the beat passes them by before they actually do it. They are
likely to take 13 steps on a 16 beat phrase-- they can't move fast enough.
For a long time I thought this problem was fatal to dancing in time-- that
it was the one thing that couldn't be overcome. Then Maggie signed up for
beginning folk dance. And intermediate. And advanced. She took my class
for two full years, dancing 45 minutes a day, 4 days a week.

Maggie was a painfully shy 11 year old with very slow coordination and
some learning disabilities. She didn't seem to get anything out of the
demonstration and instruction, moving in the correct direction, but not
distinguishing what kinds of steps were being used, or seeing which foot to
start on. She learned the sequences with many mistakes that had to be
slowly unlearned. She was also very slow in coordination, and never danced
in time to music. After a year, Maggie could learn dances by watching and
listening without help, but her reaction time was still slow and she was
usually behind the beat, and she took too few steps per phrase. I gave her
the clue of watching the other dancers, and mirroring them to try to stay
in time, and this really helped. She started getting the feel of how far
ahead she had to plan in order to match her classmates by using her eyes
instead of her ears.

In the middle of the second year she and her best friend, who was a very
fine dancer, both fell in love with Irish dancing, ("Vicky we found our
village! And its in Ireland!") and I taught the good dancer a solo jig to
perform at Folklife while the rest of the class changed costumes between
dances. She was afraid to perform it solo, though, and asked if Maggie
could do it with her. Oi! I had grave doubts about Maggie's ability to
move her feet fast enough for Irish jigs, but I said yes, as long as you
can look like twins when you do it. They ran off hand in hand. They must
have cut classes and lunch and homework and sleep to put in enough practice
time, but at the end of the week, two days before Folklife, they were both
perfect, and identical. That noontime the good dancer sprained her ankle,
and Maggie, who two years earlier had looked as though she was rhythmically
hopeless, danced a solo Irish jig with rapid-fire footwork for 400 people,
in perfect time! IT was a personal as well as a dance victory for this
shy, uncoordinated kid. I've never been more proud of a student.

So I learned from Maggie that a "poor" beginner can turn into a good dancer
given enough time and motivation and a secure environment where she won't
get discouraged. I had just never seen someone initially so poor at
dancing stay with it for long enough to get good, so I'd always thought it
wasn't possible.

I no longer believe there are people who don't hear the beat. I think
there are people who don't listen to it. I think there are people who
haven't encountered callers who explain what they need to do to improve. I
think there are people who aren't motivated to improve. I think there are
people who think moving to the beat means "now I hear it, then I move." I
think there are beginners who need some experience to work on their posture
and balance. I think there are people with slow coordination who have to
plan far ahead to get through all the movements necessary to take each
step, and make it land on time. And I think there are disabled people
whose bodies won't respond in a predictable manner and who will never dance
on the beat due to damage from stroke or cerebral palsy. But if you have
them recite poetry to music, they can. So now I think that everybody HEARS
the beat. And almost all of them can learn to dance to it.

Now how do we motivate them to do it?

Vicky Bestock

=<>=<>=<>=<>=<>=<>=<>=<>=<>=<>=<>=<>=<>=<>=<>=<>=<>=<>=<>=<>=<>
Kent W. Smith mailto:kent.smith@trincoll.edu
Institutional Research Telephones:
Trinity College Work: 860-297-5195
300 Summit St. FAX: 860-297-4202
Hartford, CT 06106-3100 Home: 860-313-0215
USA

It is never too late to be what you might have been.
-- George Eliot

=<>=<>=<>=<>=<>=<>=<>=<>=<>=<>=<>=<>=<>=<>=<>=<>=<>=<>=<>=<>=<>

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<P><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">There has been a recent thread =
on the English Country Dance list about stepping up and down more =
precisely, moving with the music, phrasing, etc. that is reminiscent of =
many such discussions among SCDers.&nbsp; Indeed, the thread was begun =
with an observation that SCD teachers are much more &quot;fussy&quot; =
about stepping up and down than are ECD callers.</FONT></P>

<P><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">That thread led to the following =
submission by Vicky Bestock, whom I believe lives in the Seattle, =
Washington, USA, area.&nbsp; IMHO, it has a great deal of value and =
insight for SCD teachers, and I'm passing it along with Vicky's =
permission.&nbsp; (For those unfamiliar with ECD, forward a double and =
back a double is 4 steps forward, usually done step-step-step-close, =
and 4 steps back.)</FONT></P>

<P>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <FONT SIZE=3D2 =
FACE=3D"Courier New">Kent (Connecticut, USA)</FONT>
</P>

<P><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">&nbsp;- - - - - - - - - - - - - =
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - </FONT>
</P>

<P><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">From: paul/victoria bestock =
[bestockp@oz.net]</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">Sent: Thursday, June 03, 1999 =
2:46 PM</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">To: =
ECD@SSRL04.SLAC.STANFORD.EDU</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">Subject: dancing to the =
beat</FONT>
</P>

<P><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">There has been some discussion =
on dancing to the beat, with several people</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">suggesting that some people =
don't &quot;feel&quot; the beat, and some hear it</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">&quot;differently.&quot;</FONT>
</P>

<P><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">When I started teaching folk =
dance full time, I did believe that some</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">people just didn't have a sense =
of rhythm. I thought that those who didn't</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">hear the beat couldn't learn, =
and those who heard it, but didn't move to</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">it, could improve, so I started =
testing students to see which problem they</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">had. In order to eliminate =
coordination, momentum and balance problems from</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">the mix, I had students clap to =
the beat and if they couldn't do that,</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">speak or make a vocal noise on =
the beat.&nbsp;&nbsp; Every single person, including</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">one kid with cerebral palsy, =
passed.&nbsp; They all heard the beat.&nbsp; </FONT>
</P>

<P><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">So experience taught me that =
there are several problems getting in their</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">way, but HEARING the beat is =
not one of them.&nbsp; Everyone hears the beat if</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">they listen for it (some =
dancers think of music as glorified background</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">noise-- they could hear the =
beat if they tried but they don't-- this is a</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">different issue).</FONT>
</P>

<P><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">1)&nbsp; Dancers need to =
understand that what we mean by dancing on the beat is</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">FINISHING a movement on the =
beat.&nbsp; Some dancers hear the beat, then move in</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">response. They think they are =
dancing on the beat because they are</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">listening for it and responding =
to it, but their footfalls are inevitably</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">after the beat.&nbsp; </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">They need to change their =
thinking about what we mean by dancing on the</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">beat, planning ahead to have =
the foot touch on the beat, instead of</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">starting the movement then. =
This is more common than you think. Knowing</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">what is expected (ending the =
movement on the beat) plus practice can fix this.</FONT>
</P>

<P><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">2) Walking requires leaning =
forward so you are slightly off balance, moving</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">one leg forward, and catching =
yourself from falling just on the beat.&nbsp; This</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">takes timing and coordination, =
and is a learned skill.&nbsp; Most of us have a</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">lot of experience getting the =
feel of how much lean to do so that we don't</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">step too soon or too late, and =
those of us who started being exposed to</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">music and dance very young =
don't realize that it isn't innate because we</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">learned it so young.&nbsp; But =
some adult beginners are trying this for the</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">first time.&nbsp; They aren't =
successful initially, but will learn to do it with</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">practice.&nbsp; </FONT>
</P>

<P><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">3) Some dancers have poor =
posture and poor body mechanics.&nbsp; They don't have</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">their weight centered, so they =
can't change direction easily. They are</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">often falling in the wrong =
direction, having to take extra steps to keep</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">from falling forward, or they =
are starting backwards too late because they</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">haven't adjusted their posture =
to account for momentum.&nbsp; To change</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">direction, one actually leans =
(from the ankles, not bending the body)</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">slightly in the opposite =
direction from the way one is moving, reducing the</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">momentum in the old direction, =
timing this so that the body comes to a</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">point of balance exactly at the =
phrase end, and starts falling in the new</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">direction at the beginning of =
the next phrase.&nbsp; Beginners don't do this.</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">They lean into the direction =
they are going, and it takes some extra time</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">to change direction-- they are =
late because they are shifting their body</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">weight and overcoming =
momentum.&nbsp; They go forward a double and it takes 5</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">1/2 steps before they can start =
moving backwards. As they gain better</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">posture and more experience, =
they can work all this out, and they dance in</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">time.&nbsp; For direction =
changes (e.g. up a double and back) I used to help</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">students speed up the process =
by telling them&nbsp; to &quot;hang themselves up by</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">the hair&quot;&nbsp; leaving =
their body more or less where it was, and moving their</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">feet underneath.&nbsp; This =
image reduced the upper body lurching in each</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">direction and enabled them to =
change direction more efficiently.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </FONT>
</P>

<P><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">4)&nbsp; Some dancers have =
sluggish coordination.&nbsp; IT takes a LONG time for the</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">signal from the brain to move =
the feet, so they think about doing the</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">motion and the beat passes them =
by before they actually do it.&nbsp; They are</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">likely to take 13 steps on a 16 =
beat phrase-- they can't move fast enough.</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">For a long time I thought this =
problem was fatal to dancing in time-- that</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">it was the one thing that =
couldn't be overcome.&nbsp; Then Maggie signed up for</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">beginning folk dance. And =
intermediate.&nbsp; And advanced.&nbsp; She took my class</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">for two full years, dancing 45 =
minutes a day, 4 days a week.&nbsp; </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">&nbsp;</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">Maggie was a painfully shy 11 =
year old&nbsp; with very slow coordination and</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">some learning disabilities. She =
didn't seem to get anything out of the</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">demonstration and instruction, =
moving in the correct direction, but not</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">distinguishing what kinds of =
steps were being used, or seeing which foot to</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">start on.&nbsp; She learned the =
sequences with many mistakes that had to be</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">slowly unlearned.&nbsp; She was =
also very slow in coordination, and never danced</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">in time to music. After a year, =
Maggie could learn dances by watching and</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">listening without help, but her =
reaction time was still slow and she was</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">usually behind the beat, and =
she took too few steps per phrase.&nbsp; I gave her</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">the clue of watching the other =
dancers, and mirroring them to try to stay</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">in time, and this really =
helped. She started getting the feel of how far</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">ahead she had to plan in order =
to match her classmates by using her eyes</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">instead of her ears.&nbsp; =
</FONT>
</P>

<P><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">In the middle of the second year =
she and her best friend, who was a very</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">fine dancer, both fell in love =
with Irish dancing, (&quot;Vicky we found our</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">village!&nbsp; And its in =
Ireland!&quot;) and I taught the good dancer a solo jig to</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">perform at Folklife while the =
rest of the class changed costumes between</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">dances.&nbsp; She was afraid to =
perform it solo, though, and asked if Maggie</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">could do it with her. Oi!&nbsp; =
I had grave doubts about Maggie's ability to</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">move her feet fast enough for =
Irish jigs, but I said yes, as long as you</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">can look like twins when you do =
it.&nbsp; They ran off hand in hand.&nbsp; They must</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">have cut classes and lunch and =
homework and sleep to put in enough practice</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">time, but at the end of the =
week, two days before Folklife, they were both</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">perfect, and identical.&nbsp; =
That noontime the good dancer sprained her ankle,</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">and Maggie, who two years =
earlier had looked as though she was rhythmically</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">hopeless, danced a solo Irish =
jig with rapid-fire footwork for 400 people,</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">in perfect time!&nbsp;&nbsp; IT =
was a personal as well as a dance victory for this</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">shy, uncoordinated kid.&nbsp; =
I've never been more proud of a student.&nbsp; </FONT>
</P>

<P><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">So I learned from Maggie that a =
&quot;poor&quot; beginner can turn into a good dancer</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">given enough time and =
motivation and a secure environment where she won't</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">get discouraged.&nbsp;&nbsp; I =
had just never seen someone initially so poor at</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">dancing stay with it for long =
enough to get good, so I'd always thought it</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">wasn't =
possible.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">&nbsp;&nbsp; </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">I no longer believe there are =
people who don't hear the beat.&nbsp; I think</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">there are people who don't =
listen to it.&nbsp; I think there are people who</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">haven't encountered callers who =
explain what they need to do to improve. I</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">think there are people who =
aren't motivated to improve.&nbsp; I think there are</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">people who think moving to the =
beat means &quot;now I hear it, then I move.&quot;&nbsp; I</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">think there are beginners who =
need some experience to work on their posture</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">and balance.&nbsp; I think =
there are people with slow coordination who have to</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">plan far ahead to get through =
all the movements necessary to take each</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">step, and make it land on =
time.&nbsp; And I think there are disabled people</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">whose bodies won't respond in a =
predictable manner and who will never dance</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">on the beat due to damage from =
stroke or cerebral palsy. But if you have</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">them recite poetry to music, =
they can.&nbsp; So now I think that everybody HEARS</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">the beat. And almost all of =
them can learn to dance to it. </FONT>
</P>

<P><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">Now how do we motivate them to =
do it? </FONT>
</P>

<P><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Courier New">Vicky =
Bestock&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; =
</FONT>
</P>

<P><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Arial"></FONT>&nbsp;<FONT =
COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 =
FACE=3D"Arial">=3D&lt;&gt;=3D&lt;&gt;=3D&lt;&gt;=3D&lt;&gt;=3D&lt;&gt;=3D=
&lt;&gt;=3D&lt;&gt;=3D&lt;&gt;=3D&lt;&gt;=3D&lt;&gt;=3D&lt;&gt;=3D&lt;&g=
t;=3D&lt;&gt;=3D&lt;&gt;=3D&lt;&gt;=3D&lt;&gt;=3D&lt;&gt;=3D&lt;&gt;=3D&=
lt;&gt;=3D&lt;&gt;=3D&lt;&gt;</FONT>
<BR><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Times New =
Roman">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Kent W. =
Smith&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</FONT><U> <FONT =
COLOR=3D"#0000FF" SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Times New Roman"><A =
HREF=3D"mailto:kent.smith@trincoll.edu">mailto:kent.smith@trincoll.edu</=
A></FONT></U>
<BR><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Times New =
Roman">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Institutional =
Research&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Telephones:</FONT>
<BR><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Times New =
Roman">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Trinity College&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; =
&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; =
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Work:&nbsp;&nbsp; =
860-297-5195</FONT></P>

<P><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Times New =
Roman">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 300 Summit St.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; =
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; =
FAX:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 860-297-4202</FONT>
<BR><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Times New =
Roman">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Hartford, CT =
06106-3100&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp; Home:&nbsp; 860-313-0215</FONT>
<BR><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Times New =
Roman">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; USA</FONT>
<BR><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Times New =
Roman">&nbsp;</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Times New =
Roman">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; It is never too late to be what =
you might have been. </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Times New =
Roman">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp=
;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp=
;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; -- George Eliot =
</FONT>
</P>

<P><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 =
FACE=3D"Arial">=3D&lt;&gt;=3D&lt;&gt;=3D&lt;&gt;=3D&lt;&gt;=3D&lt;&gt;=3D=
&lt;&gt;=3D&lt;&gt;=3D&lt;&gt;=3D&lt;&gt;=3D&lt;&gt;=3D&lt;&gt;=3D&lt;&g=
t;=3D&lt;&gt;=3D&lt;&gt;=3D&lt;&gt;=3D&lt;&gt;=3D&lt;&gt;=3D&lt;&gt;=3D&=
lt;&gt;=3D&lt;&gt;=3D&lt;&gt;</FONT>
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