strathspey Archive: Calling dances (was A Vital Issue)

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Calling dances (was A Vital Issue)

Message 16167 · Norman Dahl · 1 Mar 1999 01:16:28 · Top

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On Sun 28 Feb 1999, Priscilla Burrage wrote, quoting Sylvia Miskoe:

>> Here's an interesting side note about briefings. I do English =
Country
dance
>> on occasion. I attended the Tropical English Dance Vacation in St =
Croix.
We
>> danced 3 hours every night for a week. All the dances were briefly
walked,
>> and then they were called. I was able to dance any dance I wished, =
had a
>> great time. If the dances had not been called, I would have been an
>> embarrassment to the floor. Having the calls allowed me to focus on =
the
>> people in the set and enjoy the music, not worry about what figure =
came
next.
>> In the course of the week, we danced close to 100 dances.
>
>In most places, English dancing is not called, just as Scottish is not
>called. American contras are usually called for at least the first few
>rounds. Perhaps we should explore learn from this example.

So, why don't we call dances? It seems a very good idea, given the =
plethora
of dances that exist and the differing favourites that various groups =
may
have. In the class I attend, the teacher will generally call the first =
round
or so of a new dance once we've walked it through, and there is no doubt
that this keeps the set going when it might otherwise have fallen apart. =
The
result is that people can learn the dance in the right way, that is by =
doing
it properly in each position.

Much the same argument for calling applies to social dancing. Visitors =
may
well be unfamiliar with the local favourites and can easily go wrong, =
even
if they've studied up beforehand; and I well remember how nervous a =
beginner
gets, even within the home group. Flustered dancers generally go wrong.
Anything that keeps the dance going, so that everyone can settle down =
and
enjoy themselves, is surely worth consideration.

Or is it a Scottish characteristic to want to do things the hard way =
(like
standing up in a hammock?). Ian?
Norman Dahl
PO Box 578 Lutwyche Qld 4030

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<DIV>On Sun 28 Feb 1999, Priscilla Burrage wrote, quoting Sylvia=20
Miskoe:<BR><BR><BR>&gt;&gt; Here's an interesting side note about=20
briefings.&nbsp; I do English Country<BR>dance<BR>&gt;&gt; on =
occasion.&nbsp; I=20
attended the Tropical English Dance Vacation in St =
Croix.<BR>We<BR>&gt;&gt;=20
danced 3 hours every night for a week.&nbsp; All the dances were=20
briefly<BR>walked,<BR>&gt;&gt; and then they were called.&nbsp; I was =
able to=20
dance any dance I wished, had a<BR>&gt;&gt; great time.&nbsp; If the =
dances had=20
not been called, I would have been an<BR>&gt;&gt; embarrassment to the=20
floor.&nbsp; Having the calls allowed me to focus on the<BR>&gt;&gt; =
people in=20
the set and enjoy the music, not worry about what figure=20
came<BR>next.<BR>&gt;&gt; In the course of the week, we danced close to =
100=20
dances.<BR>&gt;<BR>&gt;In most places, English dancing is not called, =
just as=20
Scottish is not<BR>&gt;called.&nbsp; American contras are usually called =
for at=20
least the first few<BR>&gt;rounds.&nbsp; Perhaps we should explore learn =
from=20
this example.<BR><BR>So, why don't we call dances? It seems a very good =
idea,=20
given the plethora<BR>of dances that exist and the differing favourites =
that=20
various groups may<BR>have. In the class I attend, the teacher will =
generally=20
call the first round<BR>or so of a new dance once we've walked it =
through, and=20
there is no doubt<BR>that this keeps the set going when it might =
otherwise have=20
fallen apart. The<BR>result is that people can learn the dance in the =
right way,=20
that is by doing<BR>it properly in each position.<BR><BR>Much the same =
argument=20
for calling applies to social dancing. Visitors may<BR>well be =
unfamiliar with=20
the local favourites and can easily go wrong, even<BR>if they've studied =
up=20
beforehand; and I well remember how nervous a beginner<BR>gets, even =
within the=20
home group. Flustered dancers generally go wrong.<BR>Anything that keeps =
the=20
dance going, so that everyone can settle down and<BR>enjoy themselves, =
is surely=20
worth consideration.<BR><BR>Or is it a Scottish characteristic to want =
to do=20
things the hard way (like<BR>standing up in a hammock?). Ian?</DIV>
<DIV><FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2>Norman Dahl<BR>PO Box 578 Lutwyche =
Qld=20
4030</FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML>

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Calling dances (was A Vital Issue)

Message 16172 · Carfuffle · 1 Mar 1999 05:33:40 · Top

I think it just might be a Scottish characteristic to do things the hard way.
Is there another way?
Nadene Hunter
(Rochester & Buffalo NY)

Calling dances (was A Vital Issue)

Message 16184 · Richard L. Walker · 1 Mar 1999 15:24:25 · Top

The "hard" way? Or just a "different" way? ... as in different (at any
given moment) from the person you are talking to?

Richard L Walker
rlwalker@granis.net
Pensacola, FL 32504-7726 USA

-----Original Message-----
From: Carfuffle@aol.com [mailto:Carfuffle@aol.com]
Sent: Sunday, February 28, 1999 9:27 PM
To: strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de
Subject:

I think it just might be a Scottish characteristic to do things the hard
way.
Is there another way?
Nadene Hunter
(Rochester & Buffalo NY)

--
Carfuffle@aol.com

Calling dances (was A Vital Issue)

Message 16180 · Anselm Lingnau · 1 Mar 1999 13:33:01 · Top

Norman Dahl <ndahl@ozemail.com.au> writes:

> So, why don't we call dances?

Firstly, a note on terminology: I assume that you mean `calling' as in
square dancing, where the dance is being explained over the music as it
is going on, rather than `briefing' the dance before the music starts.
In our examination class, we were supposed to practice `prompting' which
I think is what you call `calling', but this was understood strictly
as an aid to teaching as opposed to something you would do during a
social occasion.

This is a very complicated issue (and, I believe, one that we have gone
over before quite some time ago). I don't think anybody will take issue
with the idea of `prompting' a class during the first one or two (or
more) turns of a dance in a lesson. I, for example, do that all the time
if it seems appropriate (for instance, I don't do it when the
intermediate or advanced dancers do a simple dance, which occasionally
happens during our beginners' hour if the beginners don't show up). And
as I said, even the RSCDS wants its candidates to be able to do it.

For social occasions, I think other considerations apply. At the first
glance, there seems to be some merit in the idea that calling dances
would make them more accessible to visitors and beginners. The problem
with this is that it does not solve the problem but merely postpones it
until the time the beginners in question come to dance with a group
where dances are not being called -- and to think we could convert all
of the SCD world to `calling' seems quite preposterous to me given the
fact that we can't even agree on how to do both-hand turns :^) If
anything, it should be an argument in favour of `weaning' beginners off
briefings and prompting as soon as possible so they can `fly solo'
rather than having to rely on a safety net. (This of course leaves out
the people who cannot for the life of them remember a reasonably simple
dance over a period of five or ten minutes, even if the dance in
question has been briefed and they are fourth couple in a three-couple
dance and so on. I don't have a patent recipe on what to do with those
and would be interested in hearing it if one exists.)

As far as `encouragement for visitors' is concerned, I think there is
much more to feeling welcomed as a visitor than being able to do the
dances. In my opinion it is vastly preferable socially (as well as more
helpful) if members of the local group or advanced dancers make a point
of asking visitors and beginners to dance and helping them through the
difficult bits using intra-set cues (non-verbal if possible, verbal if
necessary), than if somebody were to call the dances all the way
through, with the advanced dancers all near the top of the hall and the
beginners and visitors muddling about in their own sets near the bottom.
This is of course much more difficult to implement!

There are also the technical arguments:

- Some dances are so complicated as to be nearly impossible to `call'
in real time, due to `meanwhile' figures or complicated tracks. Look
at Muirland Willie, The Reel of the Royal Scots or The Bees of
Maggieknockater, to cite some dances from the list of favourites.

- The dance instructions detract from the music (unless, as in square
dancing, you have a caller who can also sing and tell a story with
the dance stuff skilfully interwoven -- but if that were made the
norm I think most of the German groups would suddenly have a bit of
a problem). I know a pianist whom it would be very easy to annoy
by shouting over his music, to the point where he would get up and
leave the room in the middle of a dance. Being a SCD musician myself,
I can understand this attitude -- you're doing your best to present
the dancers with nice and inspiring music, so you don't really want
somebody to barge in and shout things like `rights and lefts' and
`circle' out of time [*]. And since it is difficult enough to attract
good musicians, it would probably be unwise to bother them more than
necessary.

- Some people actually like the challenge of having to remember dances
on their own from a briefing via the first chord to the last.

> Anything that keeps the dance going, so that everyone can settle down
> and enjoy themselves, is surely worth consideration.

I don't think it is quite as simple as that. There is also the minor
side issue of tradition :^) (but this is another can of worms).

Anselm

[*] I should like to make clear to those of my prospective employers
who are reading this that, as a SCD class pianist, I personally
don't have anything whatever against prompting over the music as
long as it is well-executed.
--
Anselm Lingnau ......................... lingnau@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de
Bicycles are also made up of many hard and sharp components which, in
collision, can do grave damage to people and the paint finish on automobiles.
Bicycles are dangerous things.
-- P. J. O'Rourke, *A Cool and Logical Analysis of the Bicycle Menace*

Calling dances (was A Vital Issue)

Message 16186 · Priscilla M. Burrage · 1 Mar 1999 16:15:38 · Top

On Mon, 1 Mar 1999, Anselm Lingnau wrote:

> Norman Dahl <ndahl@ozemail.com.au> writes:
>
> > So, why don't we call dances?
>
> Firstly, a note on terminology: I assume that you mean `calling' as in
> square dancing, where the dance is being explained over the music as it
> is going on, rather than `briefing' the dance before the music starts.

There is a third category: The 'caller' sings the call as the dancer is
dancing the figure -- no warning ahead of time. Common practise in
western squares (US, that is).

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Priscilla Burrage Vermont US
(pburrage@zoo.uvm.edu)

Calling dances (was A Vital Issue)

Message 16188 · Anselm Lingnau · 1 Mar 1999 16:40:06 · Top

Priscilla Burrage <pburrage@zoo.uvm.edu> wrote:

> There is a third category: The 'caller' sings the call as the dancer is
> dancing the figure -- no warning ahead of time. Common practise in
> western squares (US, that is).

Yes, but we don't really have that in SCD. You could of course put
`mystery' dances on a program, but usually people will (theoretically)
always have the opportunity to check their `wee green book' or dance
instructions to figure out what is coming up.

Anselm
--
Anselm Lingnau ......................... lingnau@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de
A world where Bill Gates controls all of our choices really does scare me.
-- Will Estes

Calling dances (was A Vital Issue)

Message 16198 · Ian McHaffie · 1 Mar 1999 19:46:46 · Top

Another form of "calling":

About 35 years ago, when I was teaching a teen-age SCD group, they
occasionally asked for "dealers choice". Not exactly "calling", but
related. Each couple would choose a dance - say a 32 bar reel - and then we
would play an 8 x 32 general purpose reel. As each new first couple reached
the top of the set, they would call out their choice of dance, which the
set then did twice through. Everyone was kept on their toes and had to
think fast. Not for purists, perhaps, but great fun for experienced dancers
who wanted a cerebral challenge!

Has anyone tried it recently?

Ian McHaffie
ianmch@inforamp.net

Calling dances (was A Vital Issue)

Message 16199 · RSCDSSD · 1 Mar 1999 20:25:56 · Top

Ian McHaffie writes:

>Each couple would choose a dance -- say a 32 bar reel -- and then we
>would play an 8 x 32 general purpose reel. As each new first couple reached
>the top of the set, they would call out their choice of dance, which the
>set then did twice through. Everyone was kept on their toes and had to
>think fast. Not for purists, perhaps, but great fun for experienced dancers
>who wanted a cerebral challenge!

>Has anyone tried it recently?

I've done it a couple of times at parties and it is great fun. We've also
danced that way at informal demos at our local Highland Games with Alasdair
Fraser playing. He'd launch forth with some of his favorite reels and we'd
try to catch on in the first few bars and stay with him. Or just keep dancing
regardless of what he's playing. He's even been receptive to having us shout
out a reel and off we go. Keeps the old gray cells moving...

Marjorie McLaughlin
RSCDS SD@aol.com
San Diego, CA

Calling dances (was A Vital Issue)

Message 16204 · SMiskoe · 1 Mar 1999 23:41:18 · Top

The contra dance folks have a happy medium. The contra is called until the
dancers appear to be coping with it and the caller gradually stops calling,
occasionally giving a prompt if the set is falling apart. This works for
contra dances because they are done in long sets and one repeats the form
10-15 times.
If, gradually, calling became accepted for SCD, I would bet that the multiple
'meanwhile' head trip dances would fade.
There is a great deal of skill in calling a dance, knowing when to prompt the
figure (before the phrase), knowing how to use one's voice, knowing how much
to say, etc.
Cheers,
Sylvia Miskoe, Concord, NH USA

Calling dances (was A Vital Issue)

Message 16211 · S.M. Gent · 2 Mar 1999 13:52:53 · Top

I have just returned from the Inter-Varsity Folk Dance Festival in Exeter=
. Over
the course of the weekend there were over 1000 dancers doing a very wide =
variety
of types of dancing. Most of the learning was done in workshops which wa=
s fine
for learning, but there were also a choice of social dances each evening =
and in
the afternoons. Because there were such a variety of people there ALL da=
nces
from all traditions had to be called. We still got through a heck of a l=
ot of
dances and everyone had a great time and the briefings/callings did not u=
pset
anyone.

One area we did have a problem in was that different groups had different=
names
for the same movement. Some were fairly easy to workout (e.g. star=3Dwhe=
el) but
others were more difficult (hay =3D reel). At the end of the day though =
we were
all there to enjoy ourselves and if things went wrong then nobody cared.

One of the best parts of the weekend for me was the late night dancing on=
the
Friday. We started off doing a variety of "orgainised" dances where we w=
ere told
how to do the dances, but before very long the band were just playing a s=
et and
everyone was doing their own thing and combinig all tradtions together.

I'll apologise know if this doesn't make much sense, but the dancing was =
so good
I only got about three hours sleep all weekend.

Se=F3naid

Calling dances (was A Vital Issue)

Message 16288 · LCol. G. Logan · 8 Mar 1999 14:15:32 · Top

>
>I can't think of any square dance figures that behave anything
>like SCD meanwhile figures for 3 couples (dancing couple does one thing,
>while corners do something quite different). In square dancing, if it
>cannot be called, it isn't done.
>

Oberdan, I can give you some examples of meanwhiles in MWSD, but I don't
think it is appropriate on this net.

Calling dances (was A Vital Issue)

Message 16310 · CLubitz · 9 Mar 1999 05:52:08 · Top

reply to sylvia:

several respondents to my humorous sally said calling would kill off
complicated
figures. i disagree and in evidence i present advanced square dancing, whose
figures
are as complicated as anything in scottish. the key is to give them names,
like
the knot, or shoelace.

after all, the point of calling is NOT to teach the dance, but to help out the
large
number of dancers who have to struggle to remember WHAT comes next... NOT
how to do it. also contrary to some critics of calling, it is wonderfully
liberating
to not have to worry about WHAT comes next.

another point: in square dancing, there is often no brief, no walkthru, no
nothing.
you just line up and do what the caller says to do. that is a perfect example
of
dancers knowing the figures, but not having any concern about what comes next.
in view of the great pleasure such a dance can give, there is no ground for
believing that calling would degrade scottish.

in fact, the no-calling tradition in scottish stems from the time when the
only
scottish dancers were real scots who were brought up on it. for those of us
for whom scottish is just one of several kinds of dancing we enjoy, such a
tradition is irrelevant.

cece

Calling dances (was A Vital Issue)

Message 16316 · cnordj · 9 Mar 1999 10:01:41 · Top

>[cece:] there is no ground for believing that calling would degrade scottish.
...
for those of us for whom scottish is just one of several kinds of dancing we enjoy, such a tradition is irrelevant.>

Sorry, too broad a statement. I am one for whom scottish is just one of several kinds of dancing I enjoy, but the practice of not calling is quite relevant. And for me it would degrade it. I have even done square dancing fairly recently, and enjoy the challenge of really hearing what the caller throws at us, but the feeling of that is not what I want in scottish dance. There I want to interact with the music and the other dancers, not a voice.

Happy (Non-verbal) Dancing, Carol J, L.A.

Calling dances (was A Vital Issue)

Message 16325 · Joe Suminski · 9 Mar 1999 19:34:24 · Top

At 03:01 AM 03/09/1999 -0500, you wrote:
>>[cece:] there is no ground for believing that calling would degrade
scottish.
>...
>for those of us for whom scottish is just one of several kinds of dancing
we enjoy, such a tradition is irrelevant.>

One of the reasons that various dance forms continue to exist is that each
form provides unique formats, challenges and results. Eliminating these
qualities removes that which is attractive to that dance form. There are
many forms that utilize calling successfully. SCD utilizes non-calling
successfully.

An argument that is used in favor of calling is to make SCD easily
assimilated by beginners. I believe that ultimately the opposite would
occur. The uniqueness and much of the challenge is gone. The new dancer can
get the same thing down the road in any number of dance forms and they
don't have to learn pas de basque! Non-calling is a strength of SCD and
should be maintained and promoted as such to new dancers.

Think of SCD as the bock in the middle of the ambers, pilsners and light
beers!

Get Jiggity With It,

Joe S.

Calling dances (was A Vital Issue)

Message 16329 · SMiskoe · 9 Mar 1999 23:24:43 · Top

We've had a great discussion about calling vs not- calling, cueing vs none.
For everyone who feels there should not be calling, how would you treat a
situation like this: An opportunity for a vacation with a dance each night.
A large number of folks of varying abilities/experience who have come from a
wide area. The large number may be over 100. During the evening's dance do
you limit the fare to dances that can be briefed? Do you limit the dances to
the common repertoire? (Remember that the participants will have a tiny
common repertoire.) Do you provide cheat sheets at supper each night? In
other words, how would you ensure that everyone has a great time and gets to
do a lot of dances?
Cheers,
Sylvia Miskoe, Concord, NH USA

Calling dances (was A Vital Issue)

Message 16330 · Lara D. Friedman~Shedlov · 9 Mar 1999 23:50:29 · Top

You supply cheat sheets at supper, you brief all dances, and you even (oh
horrors!) walk through some of them. If these steps are taken, I think
almost anyone except a recent beginner could get through a large number of
dances without cuing/calling during the actual dance.

Personally I think I would prefer a quick walkthrough to calling or cuing
during the dance. In a setting such as the one described below, it would
also help by removing some of the ambiguities inherent in briefings (as
has been so aptly illustrated in previous posts about regional differences
and preferences in terminology) and it would help those who need to see/do
rather than just hear to remember.

--Lara Friedman~Shedlov

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Lara Friedman~Shedlov Never take life seriously --
laradf@mail.si.umich.edu nobody gets out alive anyway
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

On Tue, 9 Mar 1999 SMiskoe@aol.com wrote:

> We've had a great discussion about calling vs not- calling, cueing vs none.
> For everyone who feels there should not be calling, how would you treat a
> situation like this: An opportunity for a vacation with a dance each night.
> A large number of folks of varying abilities/experience who have come from a
> wide area. The large number may be over 100. During the evening's dance do
> you limit the fare to dances that can be briefed? Do you limit the dances to
> the common repertoire? (Remember that the participants will have a tiny
> common repertoire.) Do you provide cheat sheets at supper each night? In
> other words, how would you ensure that everyone has a great time and gets to
> do a lot of dances?
> Cheers,
> Sylvia Miskoe, Concord, NH USA
>
> --
> SMiskoe@aol.com
>
>

Calling dances (was A Vital Issue)

Message 16331 · Richard L. Walker · 10 Mar 1999 00:52:08 · Top

When I went you were expected to know the dances or not dance. I met a
great many chairs on that trip. These days I have little problem with most
dances (not that I don't goof) but that one memory has me briefing, calling,
cueing, handing out cheat sheets (whatever it takes) to see that most folks
have a nice time. I admit the majority of dances I attend have each dance
briefed and only the most difficult walked. They are rarely called or cued.

One thing that would help the beginners would be to have little walk-through
session before any dance for the more complex dances. This would probably
interfere with their (and / or the teacher's) vacation and might in fact be
impossible to do, but it would help for the dance. The alternative might be
to limit the number of complex dances on any particular program. If most of
them are fairly popular, the dancers should have a good time. You are
talking about a tour or vacation activity where you can shed the formality
of other events a bit -- but not too much.

Richard L Walker
rlwalker@granis.net
Pensacola, FL 32504-7726 USA

Calling dances (was A Vital Issue)

Message 16358 · John W. Southcombe · 10 Mar 1999 23:29:16 · Top

At 04:22 PM 3/9/99 -0500, you wrote:
>We've had a great discussion about calling vs not- calling, cueing vs none.
>For everyone who feels there should not be calling, how would you treat a
>situation like this: An opportunity for a vacation with a dance each night.
>A large number of folks of varying abilities/experience who have come from a
>wide area. The large number may be over 100. During the evening's dance do
>you limit the fare to dances that can be briefed? Do you limit the dances to
>the common repertoire? (Remember that the participants will have a tiny
>common repertoire.) Do you provide cheat sheets at supper each night? In
>other words, how would you ensure that everyone has a great time and gets to
>do a lot of dances?

My vote is to:

CALL the DANCES

Bye,
John W. Southcombe
jws@one.net

Calling dances (was A Vital Issue)

Message 16359 · Lara D. Friedman~Shedlov · 10 Mar 1999 23:56:46 · Top

I assume those who advocate calling dances are talking about having
someone standing at the top of the room and calling out the upcoming
figures as the dance is in progress.

Besides the other objections that have already been noted, another
disadvantage of this practice is that it means someone must stand up there
and call the dance and therefore miss out on actually dancing. It's
already hard enough to get good briefers. I think it would be even harder
to get folks to agree to do it if it meant that they had to miss all the
dances they were in charge of briefing/calling.

95% of the time we're only talking about 32 bars (Ian Powrie's FTA is
obviously an exception). I think most folks can remember 32 bars with a
(well-done) briefing and and in some cases a quick walk-through.

--Lara

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Lara Friedman~Shedlov Never take life seriously --
laradf@mail.si.umich.edu nobody gets out alive anyway
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Calling dances (was A Vital Issue)

Message 16365 · CLubitz · 11 Mar 1999 06:01:09 · Top

dear carol j.

did i really say that? there have been so many entries in this thread that i
have lost
track.

what is very clear is that opinions differ on this topic and no solution will
please
everyone. if there were lots and lots of dancers we could stratify by tastes,
but alas
in our group we are all in it together.

and a parting thought. whether calling "degrades" scottish or "improves" it,
is a
totally subjective matter. if you had been brought up with called or cued
scottish,
you would think it was the norm and it wouldn't bother you. and please, that
is NOT
meant as a criticism, just an observation. :) :) :) :)

cece

Calling dances (was A Vital Issue)

Message 16376 · Ian Price · 11 Mar 1999 18:00:51 · Top

Message text written by INTERNET:strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.d=
e
>if you had been brought up with called or cued
scottish,
you would think it was the norm and it wouldn't bother you.<

But it ISN'T !!!

It is a traditional cultural art form - DON'T mess with it. please?

It pains me to see well-intentioned North Americans applying their
marketing norms to the activity (i.e., 'expand to survive'), by encouragi=
ng
a relaxation of standards and expectations in order to involve more peopl=
e.
It is a fundamentally flawed approach, in that the very same criteria wil=
l
serve to turn people OFF who got into this precisely because of the high
standards and expectations demanded. =

I (and many others) do NOT do this because it is 'popular', but because i=
t
is a slightly 'eccentric' pastime. If it is not kept that way, I shall lo=
se
interest.

And whilst I'm at it, I find the stereotyping of SCD as 'just another sty=
le
of ethnic dance' to be added to a dance freak's repertoire like a notch o=
n
their gun (or bedpost), somewhat insulting.

Harrumph!

-2chter

Calling dances (was A Vital Issue)

Message 16395 · Bryan McAlister · 12 Mar 1999 01:35:22 · Top

In article <199903111059_MC2-6DA0-EA56@compuserve.com>, Ian Price
<IanPrice@compuserve.com> writes
>Message text written by INTERNET:strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de
>>if you had been brought up with called or cued
>scottish,
>you would think it was the norm and it wouldn't bother you.<
>
>But it ISN'T !!!
>
>It is a traditional cultural art form - DON'T mess with it. please?
>
Traditional - RSGDS dancing - well I never
>

--
Bryan McAlister

Calling dances (was A Vital Issue)

Message 16415 · James R. Ferguson · 12 Mar 1999 21:15:56 · Top

Amen, Jim

Ian Price wrote:

> Message text written by INTERNET:strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de
> >if you had been brought up with called or cued
> scottish,
> you would think it was the norm and it wouldn't bother you.<
>
> But it ISN'T !!!
>
> It is a traditional cultural art form - DON'T mess with it. please?
>
> It pains me to see well-intentioned North Americans applying their
> marketing norms to the activity (i.e., 'expand to survive'), by encouraging
> a relaxation of standards and expectations in order to involve more people.
> It is a fundamentally flawed approach, in that the very same criteria will
> serve to turn people OFF who got into this precisely because of the high
> standards and expectations demanded.
>
> I (and many others) do NOT do this because it is 'popular', but because it
> is a slightly 'eccentric' pastime. If it is not kept that way, I shall lose
> interest.
>
> And whilst I'm at it, I find the stereotyping of SCD as 'just another style
> of ethnic dance' to be added to a dance freak's repertoire like a notch on
> their gun (or bedpost), somewhat insulting.
>
> Harrumph!
>
> -2chter
>
> --
> Ian Price <IanPrice@compuserve.com>

Calling dances (was A Vital Issue)

Message 16384 · Bryan McAlister · 11 Mar 1999 20:35:15 · Top

In article <Pine.SOL.3.95.990310165127.10421L-100000@bart.si.umich.edu>,
Lara D. Friedman~Shedlov <laradf@si.umich.edu> writes
>I assume those who advocate calling dances are talking about having
>someone standing at the top of the room and calling out the upcoming
>figures as the dance is in progress.
>
>Besides the other objections that have already been noted, another
>disadvantage of this practice is that it means someone must stand up there
>and call the dance and therefore miss out on actually dancing. It's
>already hard enough to get good briefers.

Ask the band to provide a caller and pay them.

--
Bryan McAlister

Calling dances (was A Vital Issue)

Message 16393 · Robert MacIsaac/Anne Gillis · 12 Mar 1999 00:32:45 · Top

Ian Price wrote:

> >if you had been brought up with called or cued
> scottish,
> you would think it was the norm and it wouldn't bother you.<
>
> But it ISN'T !!!
>
> It is a traditional cultural art form - DON'T mess with it. please?
> And whilst I'm at it, I find the stereotyping of SCD as 'just another style
> of ethnic dance' to be added to a dance freak's repertoire like a notch on
> their gun (or bedpost), somewhat insulting.
>
> Harrumph!
>
> -2chter

Very well said, Ian

Calling dances (was A Vital Issue)

Message 16193 · Ian Price · 1 Mar 1999 18:00:26 · Top

Message text written by INTERNET:strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.d=
e
>Or is it a Scottish characteristic to want to do things the hard way (li=
ke
>standing up in a hammock?). Ian?<

Nice try Norman, but as you know 'I already gave at the Office'. Is it ti=
me
for this topic again already??

-2chter

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