strathspey Archive: Scottish Waltz/Come Dancing

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Scottish Waltz/Come Dancing

Message 14834 · Rhona Watson · 3 Dec 1998 11:36:46 · Top

Last month Come Dancing filmed its 50th anniversary show in the Albert
Hall. It is to be shown on British television sometime in the new year.
It is well worth watching even though they don't have a scottish dancers as
one of their formation teams this time.

Also, the modern waltz and scottish waltz are different. I think the
scottish waltz is the same as the old time waltz- i.e. the steps you dance
at the end of a St. Bernard's, whereas modern ballroom waltzing is done to
a different timing and has different footwork.

Rhona

----------
From: Ian Price <IanPrice@compuserve.com>
To: INTERNET:strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de
Subject: Scottish Waltz
Date: 02 December 1998 18:15

Message text written by INTERNET:strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de
>But is "Scottish Waltz" a choregraphed dance?
>or just a waltz with Scottish tunes?<

Oh, completely different!

For a start it is played at 33 bars per minute instead of the regular 32

Then the step is much closer to a slow-mo PDB than you would find on 'Come
Dancing' (is that show still going on UK TV??)

Finally the figure pattern is an allegory for the pattern of sheep at a
sheepdog trial in Melrose, as observed and written down by Lady Jane
Robinson (Sir Walter Scott's housekeeper) in 1834. The manuscript lay
undisturbed in a deed box in the vault of a WS's office in Edinburgh until
1972 when it was released 100 years after her death along with other
salacious revelations. Serialised on an inside page of The Scotsman, it was
picked up along with budgerigar droppings from the bottom of a birdcage in
Coates Crescent, and subsequently placed before the RSCDS Publications
Committee. The rest is history.

-Another piece of ridiculously trivival disinformation from the 2chter. :-)

--
Ian Price <IanPrice@compuserve.com>

----------

Scottish Waltz/Come Dancing

Message 14835 · Richard L. Walker · 3 Dec 1998 16:40:40 · Top

When we did the Scottish Waltz at Thistle School, everything was
about the same except the footwork which was opposite. If a
regular waltz had the guy leading with his left foot, the Scottish
Waltz had the guy leading with his right foot. Right or wrong, it
was a lot of fun. Almost drove you batty.

-----Original Message-----
From: Rhona Watson <rkw10@cus.cam.ac.uk>

...Also, the modern waltz and scottish waltz are different. I
think the
scottish waltz is the same as the old time waltz- i.e. the steps
you dance
at the end of a St. Bernard's, whereas modern ballroom waltzing is
done to
a different timing and has different footwork...

Scottish Waltz/Come Dancing

Message 14846 · Bryan McAlister · 4 Dec 1998 00:34:08 · Top

In article <002601be1eca$aac029e0$8ddcfea9@rlwalker>, Richard L. Walker
<rlwalker@granis.net> writes
>When we did the Scottish Waltz at Thistle School, everything was
>about the same except the footwork which was opposite. If a
>regular waltz had the guy leading with his left foot, the Scottish
>Waltz had the guy leading with his right foot.

The other way about
>Right or wrong, it
>was a lot of fun. Almost drove you batty.
>
>-----Original Message-----
>From: Rhona Watson <rkw10@cus.cam.ac.uk>
>
>...Also, the modern waltz and scottish waltz are different. I
>think the
>scottish waltz is the same as the old time waltz- i.e. the steps
>you dance
>at the end of a St. Bernard's, whereas modern ballroom waltzing is
>done to
>a different timing and has different footwork...
>
>
>
>--
>"Richard L. Walker" <rlwalker@granis.net>
>

--
Bryan McAlister

Scottish Waltz/Come Dancing

Message 14860 · Vanessa Otto · 4 Dec 1998 10:12:49 · Top

>When we did the Scottish Waltz at Thistle School, everything was
>about the same except the footwork which was opposite. If a
>regular waltz had the guy leading with his left foot, the Scottish
>Waltz had the guy leading with his right foot. Right or wrong, it
>was a lot of fun. Almost drove you batty.

Sort of... ...Actually, waltz is waltz. What really distinguishes Waltzes
and the kinds of steps you can do is the speed. So-called "Modern" Waltz is
a slow waltz. There is a great variety of steps available for the slow
waltz in both International and American Smooth (Natural Turn, Reverse
Turn, Curving Three, Feather, Curving Feather, Spin Turn, Impetus Turn,
Pivots, various Weaves, various Locks and Turning Locks, Open & Closed
Tellemark, various Hovers and Twinkles, Rolls, Grapevines, Diamond Turns,
Double Reverse, Double Natural, various Rondees, various picture figures,
and on and on...). At the fast end of the speed spectrum is the Viennese
Waltz. It is so fast that there aren't many different steps you can do
except waltz turning right or left (with the Viennese lock) or spinning
(running?) on the spot. In between these is where most Scottish Waltzes
fall. They usually tend to be fairly fast, but not usually as fast as
Viennese.

The basic Waltz step is a Step Forward, Side, Close or a Step Back, Side,
Close. If you step forward with the right foot or back with the left, the
step easily turns to the right ("Natural Turn"). If you step forward with
the left foot or back with the right foot, the step easily turns to the
left ("Reverse Turn").

Probably more than you wanted to know...

Cheers, Oberdan.

Scottish Waltz/Come Dancing

Message 14917 · Alastair Murdoch · 5 Dec 1998 21:13:41 · Top

Thanks for straightening this out, Oberdan. And no, it was not more
than I wanted to know.
Alastair

> >When we did the Scottish Waltz at Thistle School, everything was
> >about the same except the footwork which was opposite. If a
> >regular waltz had the guy leading with his left foot, the Scottish
> >Waltz had the guy leading with his right foot. Right or wrong, it
> >was a lot of fun. Almost drove you batty.
>
> Sort of... ...Actually, waltz is waltz. What really distinguishes Waltzes
> and the kinds of steps you can do is the speed. So-called "Modern" Waltz is
> a slow waltz. There is a great variety of steps available for the slow
> waltz in both International and American Smooth (Natural Turn, Reverse
> Turn, Curving Three, Feather, Curving Feather, Spin Turn, Impetus Turn,
> Pivots, various Weaves, various Locks and Turning Locks, Open & Closed
> Tellemark, various Hovers and Twinkles, Rolls, Grapevines, Diamond Turns,
> Double Reverse, Double Natural, various Rondees, various picture figures,
> and on and on...). At the fast end of the speed spectrum is the Viennese
> Waltz. It is so fast that there aren't many different steps you can do
> except waltz turning right or left (with the Viennese lock) or spinning
> (running?) on the spot. In between these is where most Scottish Waltzes
> fall. They usually tend to be fairly fast, but not usually as fast as
> Viennese.
>
> The basic Waltz step is a Step Forward, Side, Close or a Step Back, Side,
> Close. If you step forward with the right foot or back with the left, the
> step easily turns to the right ("Natural Turn"). If you step forward with
> the left foot or back with the right foot, the step easily turns to the
> left ("Reverse Turn").
>
> Probably more than you wanted to know...
>
> Cheers, Oberdan.
>
>
>
> --
> Vanessa Otto <votto@tvt.com>
>
>
Alastair Murdoch
Faculty of Management
University of Manitoba
Winnipeg, Canada R3T 5V4
E-mail: alastair_murdoch@UManitoba.ca
WWW site: http://www.umanitoba.ca/9.305/
Phone: 204 474 8439 Fax: 204 474 7545

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