strathspey Archive: "Trip to Bavaria"

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"Trip to Bavaria"

Message 14232 · B. G. Charlton · 4 Nov 1998 05:57:47 · Top

I think that Andrew Gillies told us that he was a member of the team that=

went to Germany. Could someone ask him?

He may also be able to shed some light on how the tune was selected.

Brian Charlton,
Sydney, Australia

"Trip to Bavaria"

Message 14271 · Ron.Mackey · 5 Nov 1998 02:40:56 · Top

> I think that Andrew Gillies told us that he was a member of the team that
> went to Germany. Could someone ask him?
>
> He may also be able to shed some light on how the tune was selected.
>
> Brian Charlton,
> Sydney, Australia
>
Hi,
I'm not too sure that he is in the country at the moment but I'll
try and get through tomorrow. It's 00.05 am, & I don't think a
call would be appreciated. I believe he goes to bed earlier these
days !! :)

Cheers, Ron :)

< 0 Ron Mackey,
'O> Mottingham,
/#\ London. UK.
l>
Ron.Mackey@btinternet.com

"Trip to Bavaria"

Message 14493 · Ron.Mackey · 12 Nov 1998 01:24:20 · Top

> I think that Andrew Gillies told us that he was a member of the team that
> went to Germany. Could someone ask him?
>
> He may also be able to shed some light on how the tune was selected.
>
> Brian Charlton,
> Sydney, Australia
>

Hi, Brian
Andrew has just come back from out of the country as I suspected.
He has returned from Scotland :)
He says that he did not go on that trip. He rather thinks it was a
reference to Duncan MacLeod who made the trip??
He comments that it is a commentary on the popularity of the dance
that it was so well known and yet never in print until Peter Knight
included it in the Collins book.
Someone has borrowed(!) my copy I cannot look it up.
The tune is, or was, a version of a hiking song from Germany, or
thereabouts, which was rather popular in this country at the time
so it appears that the song preceeded the dance.
. The words go:-

I love to go awandering
Along a mountain track
And as I go, I love to sing
'My knapsack on my back'
Falderee falderaa
'My knapsack on my back'

Those with a memory and good lungs would dance and sing
( I originally typed 'sin' !! ) all the way through !!

Hope that fills in some holes?

Cheers, Ron :)

< 0 Ron Mackey,
'O> Mottingham,
/#\ London. UK.
l>
Ron.Mackey@btinternet.com

"Trip to Bavaria"

Message 14494 · Richard L. Walker · 12 Nov 1998 01:49:26 · Top

Talk about popular. We marched to that tune in (Navy) boot camp
back in the early 60s. ewww that was a long time ago.

-----Original Message-----
From: Ron.Mackey@post.btinternet.com
<Ron.Mackey@post.btinternet.com>

...
I love to go awandering
Along a mountain track
And as I go, I love to sing
'My knapsack on my back'
Falderee falderaa
'My knapsack on my back'
...

"Trip to Bavaria"

Message 14498 · Ian Price · 12 Nov 1998 02:59:24 · Top

Message text written by INTERNET:strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.d=
e
>I love to go awandering =

Along a mountain track
And as I go, I love to sing
'My knapsack on my back'
Falderee falderaa
'My knapsack on my back'<

That's "The Happy Wanderer" (which is a "Quickstep"). Never ever saw the
dance done to that tune, although it's just about possible (with a
stretch).

-2chter

"Trip to Bavaria"

Message 14506 · Anselm Lingnau · 12 Nov 1998 10:17:45 · Top

Ian Price <IanPrice@compuserve.com> writes:

> That's "The Happy Wanderer" (which is a "Quickstep"). Never ever saw th=
e
> dance done to that tune, although it's just about possible (with a
> stretch).

I'm not really an authority as far as German folk songs in English
translation are concerned, but speaking from the point of view of a
native, I also think you would be more likely to encounter that tune in
a set for the Irish Rover!

About the Trip to Bavaria tune: This is well-known in these parts as a
song under the title of `Die Fischerin vom Bodensee' (The Bodensee
fisher-woman). I would have to research the actual words but as far as I
can remember they are something like

Die Fischerin vom Bodensee
Ist eine sch=F6ne Maid, juchhe!

There was a movie by the same title back when they still used to make
such movies, which was before my time, so somebody else would have to
comment on whether this has anything to do with the music.

As a geographical aside, it must be mentioned that the Bodensee is, in
point of fact, nowhere near Bavaria -- it is also traditionally called
the `Suebian Sea' (Schw=E4bisches Meer) because of its comparative size
and the part of Germany it borders on.

Anselm
-- =

Anselm Lingnau ......................... lingnau@tm.informatik.uni-frankf=
urt.de
The major difference between a thing that might go wrong and a thing that=

cannot possibly go wrong is that when a thing that cannot possibly go wro=
ng
goes wrong it usually turns out to be impossible to get at or repair.
-- Douglas Adams, *Mostly Har=
mless*

"Trip to Bavaria"

Message 14532 · Ron.Mackey · 12 Nov 1998 22:55:25 · Top

> Ian Price <IanPrice@compuserve.com> writes:
>
> > That's "The Happy Wanderer" (which is a "Quickstep"). Never ever saw the
> > dance done to that tune, although it's just about possible (with a
> > stretch).
>
> I'm not really an authority as far as German folk songs in English
> translation are concerned, but speaking from the point of view of a
> native, I also think you would be more likely to encounter that tune in
> a set for the Irish Rover!
>
> About the Trip to Bavaria tune: This is well-known in these parts as a
> song under the title of `Die Fischerin vom Bodensee' (The Bodensee
> fisher-woman).> --
> Anselm Lingnau
>
Looks like I got that wrong or else I am remembering a certain band
that did this sort of thing.

>
>
Cheers, Ron :)

< 0 Ron Mackey,
'O> Mottingham,
/#\ London. UK.
l>
Ron.Mackey@btinternet.com

"Trip to Bavaria"

Message 14526 · Ian Price · 12 Nov 1998 19:12:53 · Top

Message text written by INTERNET:strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.d=
e
>About the Trip to Bavaria tune: This is well-known in these parts as a
song under the title of `Die Fischerin vom Bodensee' (The Bodensee
fisher-woman). <

Does this refer to "The Happy Wanderer" or Hamish's Tune"?

-2chter

"Trip to Bavaria"

Message 14527 · Anselm Lingnau · 12 Nov 1998 19:30:23 · Top

Ian Price <IanPrice@compuserve.com> writes:

> Does this refer to "The Happy Wanderer" or Hamish's Tune"?

Hamish's Tune (aka The Remerts of Hertford).

The Happy Wanderer, I think, is called `Mein Vater War Ein Wandersmann'.
The German words go something like

Mein Vater war ein Wandersmann My father was a wanderer
Und mir liegt's auch im Blut; And I have it in my blood, too;
Drum wandre ich, so oft ich kann So I wander as often as I can,
Und schwenke meinen Hut. Waving my hat in the process.
Falleri, fallera etc.
Und schwenke meinen Hut.

(Sorry that the literal translation doesn't scan.) I'd venture to guess
that it is still a popular song in the appropriate circles.

Anselm
-- =

Anselm Lingnau ......................... lingnau@tm.informatik.uni-frankf=
urt.de
Those who deny freedom to others deserve it not for themselves.
-- Abraham L=
incoln

"Trip to Bavaria"

Message 14530 · B. G. Charlton · 12 Nov 1998 22:34:18 · Top

Message text written by INTERNET:strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.d=
e
>>About the Trip to Bavaria tune: This is well-known in these parts as a
song under the title of `Die Fischerin vom Bodensee' (The Bodensee
fisher-woman). <

Does this refer to "The Happy Wanderer" or Hamish's Tune"?
<

"Hamish's Tune", Ian. My minimal knowledge of German is enough to know th=
at
the words fit better than "The Happy Wanderer".

Nobody has commented about my information that the tune was one of the
(many) traditional tunes arranged by Beethoven and I have heard it played=

on a Classical Music station. This may be the link between Scotland and
Bavaria, where the tune was used for the "Fisherwoman of Bodensee" (I sai=
d
my German was minimal!). I have had for some time wanted to search out th=
e
Beethoven recording to find out the information given with it, but I
haven't found it yet.

Brian Charlton,
Sydney, Australia

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