strathspey Archive: Ladies and gentlemen

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Ladies and gentlemen

Message 14128 · Mike Briggs · 2 Nov 1998 19:50:23 · Top

Would some kind soul please define what differentiates "ladies" from
"women" and "gentlemen" from "men" in these latter days of the 20th
century?

Mike
--
*************************************************
Norma and Mike Briggs 1.608.2571600 (voice)
Briggs Law Office 1.608.2571611 (fax)
1914 Monroe St
Madison WI 53711-2057 USA brigglaw@execpc.com
-------------------------------------------------
A NEIGHBORHOOD LAW OFFICE
*************************************************

Ladies and gentlemen

Message 14130 · McBride, Ann · 2 Nov 1998 20:05:26 · Top

For what its worth, I was always taught that "Ladies & Gentlemen" was
used in publicly addressing an assembly (vocally or in writing); "men
and women" were used in a "statistical" content. Titles Man & Lady
should never be used together, or Gentleman & woman. But there is also
an old saying, a lady would never object to be called a woman, and a
woman should always be treated like a lady!

> ----------
> From: Mike Briggs[SMTP:brigglaw@execpc.com]
> Reply To: strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de
> Sent: Monday, November 02, 1998 9:50 AM
> To: Strathspey server
> Subject: Ladies and gentlemen
>
> Would some kind soul please define what differentiates "ladies" from
> "women" and "gentlemen" from "men" in these latter days of the 20th
> century?
>
> Mike
> --
> *************************************************
> Norma and Mike Briggs 1.608.2571600 (voice)
> Briggs Law Office 1.608.2571611 (fax)
> 1914 Monroe St
> Madison WI 53711-2057 USA brigglaw@execpc.com
> -------------------------------------------------
> A NEIGHBORHOOD LAW OFFICE
> *************************************************
>

Ladies and gentlemen

Message 14132 · Richard L. Walker · 2 Nov 1998 20:39:07 · Top

Imagine two of said similar objects side by side, and they each
rob a bank.
Assume further that one gets caught.
The one who gets caught is a man or woman; the one who doesn't is
a gentleman or lady.
(At least I hope that was a tongue in cheek question - ha ha)

-----Original Message-----
From: Mike Briggs <brigglaw@execpc.com>

Would some kind soul please define what differentiates "ladies"
from
"women" and "gentlemen" from "men" in these latter days of the
20th
century?

Ladies and gentlemen

Message 14134 · Mike Briggs · 2 Nov 1998 20:53:52 · Top

Actually, no: it wasn't a "tongue-in-cheek" question. I was raised in
the UK and have lived in the Southern US, and in those cultures had the
usual amount of exposure to what (IMHO) are the outdated classist
implications of these hardly synonymous word pairs. I was just curious
to hear whether others on the list believe, as I do, that the usefulness
of "ladies" and "gentlemen" is dead or at least dying, and why some
might think it preferable to use "ladies" rather than "women" in a dance
description.

Mike
--
*************************************************
Norma and Mike Briggs 1.608.2571600 (voice)
Briggs Law Office 1.608.2571611 (fax)
1914 Monroe St
Madison WI 53711-2057 USA brigglaw@execpc.com
-------------------------------------------------
A NEIGHBORHOOD LAW OFFICE
*************************************************

Ladies and gentlemen

Message 14148 · Chris Collin · 3 Nov 1998 00:46:37 · Top

Mike Briggs wrote:
>
> Would some kind soul please define what differentiates "ladies" from
> "women" and "gentlemen" from "men" in these latter days of the 20th
> century?
>
> Mike

If you have to ask, you are a man. :)

Ladies and gentlemen

Message 14150 · Ron.Mackey · 3 Nov 1998 01:38:38 · Top

> For what its worth, I was always taught that "Ladies & Gentlemen" was
> used in publicly addressing an assembly (vocally or in writing); "men
> and women" were used in a "statistical" content. Titles Man & Lady
> should never be used together, or Gentleman & woman. But there is also
> an old saying, a lady would never object to be called a woman, and a
> woman should always be treated like a lady!
>

Hi,
How about always using an honorific 'Ladies and Gentlemen'. Then
because the full version is cumbersome, shortening the latter to
'Men'. What is in the mind counts most.
Cheers, Ron :)

< 0 Ron Mackey,
'O> Mottingham,
/#\ London. UK.
l>
Ron.Mackey@btinternet.com

Ladies and gentlemen

Message 14155 · Norah Link · 3 Nov 1998 04:37:21 · Top

>>> <strathspey-request@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de> 02/11/98 01:50 pm >>>
I was just curious
to hear whether others on the list believe, as I do, that the usefulness
of "ladies" and "gentlemen" is dead or at least dying, and why some
might think it preferable to use "ladies" rather than "women" in a dance
description.
<<<

I suppose I break all of Mike's rules. I don't think I ever refer to "1st lady"
as opposed to "1st woman", but I do use "women" and "ladies" interchangeably in
briefings, depending on what contributes to the flow of words, and what I think
will be easily enunciated by me and easily understood by the dancers without
sounding artificial. As you said, Mike, any reason we shouldn't think of
ourselves as ladies? ;^)

Norah

Ladies and gentlemen

Message 14157 · Ian Price · 3 Nov 1998 05:31:40 · Top

Message text written by INTERNET:strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.d=
e
>Would some kind soul please define what differentiates "ladies" from
"women" and "gentlemen" from "men" in these latter days of the 20th
century?<

Didncha just KNOW I'd bite on this one ?

I always could tell whether I was in England or Scotland by the signs on
the Public Conveniences. =

In Gretna the cludgies were labelled "Ladies" and "Gentlemen"
=

In Carlisle the bogs were signposted "Men" and "Women"

Could someone from the old country confirm if this is still true?

-2chter

Ladies and gentlemen

Message 14203 · Bryan McAlister · 3 Nov 1998 22:09:57 · Top

In article <199811022231_MC2-5EEA-912C@compuserve.com>, Ian Price
<IanPrice@compuserve.com> writes
>Message text written by INTERNET:strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de
>>Would some kind soul please define what differentiates "ladies" from
>"women" and "gentlemen" from "men" in these latter days of the 20th
>century?<
>
>Didncha just KNOW I'd bite on this one ?
>
>I always could tell whether I was in England or Scotland by the signs on
>the Public Conveniences.
>
> In Gretna the cludgies were labelled "Ladies" and "Gentlemen"
>
> In Carlisle the bogs were signposted "Men" and "Women"

This reminds me of an old bit of scurrilous toilet graffiti...something
along these lines
In England we wash our hands after using the toilet - In Scotland we
dont pxxx on our hands.

--
Bryan McAlister

Ladies and gentlemen

Message 14209 · Richard L. Walker · 3 Nov 1998 23:22:08 · Top

Good idea. I still remember swapping sides and having to do a
promenade in one dance and an allemande in another. If you have
only danced these formations as a guy (heh heh), it feels
completely different as a gal (ducking).

-----Original Message-----
From: Bryan McAlister <Bryan@bryanmac.demon.co.uk>

...In practice I would encourage swapping roles occasionally to
enable male
dancers to experience what its like on the other side.

Ladies

Message 14193 · Rita Hamilton · 3 Nov 1998 19:47:13 · Top

I was always told that:
Women perspire and Ladies glow.

Rita
May neither your strings nor your spirit ever break,
May your harp and your soul always be in tune.

Ladies

Message 14199 · McBride, Ann · 3 Nov 1998 21:38:51 · Top

My teaching was that: Horses sweat, gentlemen perspire, and ladies
glow!

> ----------
> From: Rita Hamilton[SMTP:harpist@infi.net]
> Reply To: strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de
> Sent: Tuesday, November 03, 1998 9:47 AM
> To: strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de
> Subject: Re: Ladies
>
> I was always told that:
> Women perspire and Ladies glow.
>
> Rita
> May neither your strings nor your spirit ever break,
> May your harp and your soul always be in tune.
>
> --
> Rita Hamilton <harpist@infi.net>
>

Ladies

Message 14205 · Ian Price · 3 Nov 1998 22:55:28 · Top

Message text written by INTERNET:strathspey@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.d=
e
>I was always told that:
Women perspire and Ladies glow.<

I'd forgotten that! Didn't it begin "Horses sweat ..."

-2chter

Ladies and gentlemen

Message 14202 · Bryan McAlister · 3 Nov 1998 22:09:40 · Top

In article <s63e2373.061@wpgate.cae.ca>, Norah Link <norah@cae.ca>
writes
>
>
>>>> <strathspey-request@tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de> 02/11/98 01:50 pm >>>
>I was just curious
>to hear whether others on the list believe, as I do, that the usefulness
>of "ladies" and "gentlemen" is dead or at least dying, and why some
>might think it preferable to use "ladies" rather than "women" in a dance
>description.
Every time I call I make the effort to say men and women but it dont
come naturally.

Additionally, as with other thing size does matter..
Its easier to allemand if your partner is wee-er than you. Maybe the
bigger of the two dancers should become de facto the man for that dance,
and vice versa.
Where flying baskets are involved wee-er people do less damage.

In practice I would encourage swapping roles occasionally to enable male
dancers to experience what its like on the other side.
--
Bryan McAlister

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